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Eastern Boys Productions

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines." --William Shakespeare's "Hamlet" Bard watchers won't hear these famous lines in the Eastern Boys Productions' version of "Hamlet," which continues this weekend at the Santa Ana City Hall Police Annex.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Veronica's Room," a potboiler that is both overcooked and half-baked, seems to have found a secure niche in the life of Orange County's non-professional theater world. The Eastern Boys production now at the Ensemble Theatre is the third local offering of this 1973 thriller during the past two seasons alone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 1992 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Veronica's Room," a potboiler that is both overcooked and half-baked, seems to have found a secure niche in the life of Orange County's non-professional theater world. The Eastern Boys production now at the Ensemble Theatre is the third local offering of this 1973 thriller during the past two seasons alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you trippingly on the tongue; but if you mouth it, as many of your players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines." --William Shakespeare's "Hamlet" Bard watchers won't hear these famous lines in the Eastern Boys Productions' version of "Hamlet," which continues this weekend at the Santa Ana City Hall Police Annex.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1990 | M.E. WARREN
Eastern Boys Productions of Santa Ana is presenting an original play by R.A. Blankenship Jr. and Kevin Darne entitled "Irony of an Uncrowned Prince." Although the play's themes of self-determination and essential human dignity are worthy and challenging, the production is loose and unfocused, as is the script, which tends toward repetition and explanation rather than action.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
The question of alternative casting in Eastern Boys Productions' contemporary staging of "A Streetcar Named Desire" was almost irrelevant at Friday's opening night--various problems were more pressing. But let's address that issue at the start. Director Walter Brown's decision (with input from assistant director Steve Scholl) to have a black Stanley Kowalski (R.A. Blankenship Jr.) did not necessarily add to Tennessee Williams' estimable drama, but neither did it dilute the play's integrity.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1993 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eastern Boys Productions has a blueprint for becoming a theater company. The plan is smudged here and there, and some of edges have crumbled, but it's a beginning. Working out of a modest but comfortable storefront in a small shopping mall in Orange, the enterprising Blankenship brothers, who are the Eastern Boys of the company's name, are presenting "The Fourposter," that venerable comedy by Jan de Hartog.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1990 | MARK CHALON SMITH
To Walter Brown's way of thinking, Stanley Kowalski has been reincarnated too often as white trash, the ghetto ape "who drools and drags his knuckles" across the American stage. It's not that Brown is disenchanted with the brutal linchpin of Tennessee Williams' classic drama "A Streetcar Named Desire." Like everybody else, Brown feels that Kowalski, in all his overheated vulgarity as Williams originally portrayed him, is one of theater's great characters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1990
In his review ("'Streetcar' Stalls," Calendar March 14), Mark Chalon Smith seemed to regard the characterizations in (the Eastern Boys' production of) "A Streetcar Named Desire" solely in terms of racial issues, and he overlooked the artistic value of the play itself. It is very possible for a white female to be attracted to a black male and at the same time to feel resentment or prejudice toward other blacks. A survey probably would show that most interracial relationships are based on character, not color.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Eastern Boys Productions' "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" has a few things recommending it: Walter Brown's direction occasionally finds the nerves in Tennessee Williams' tale of domestic Southern discomfort, and Deidre West has her moments as the simmering, desperate Maggie. Then there's the production's charitable aspect--a dollar will be trimmed from the small admission price for anyone bringing a canned good for the homeless. But despite the good intentions, this "Cat" ultimately stumbles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 1994 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We tend to love the con man, especially the traveling kind. Take Bill Starbuck. He strolls onto the drought-plagued Curry farm, spouts off like a Pentecostal preacher and promises he can bring rain in 24 hours. Nobody really buys his yarn in "The Rainmaker," N. Richard Nash's play that opened last weekend in a wobbly production at the Ensemble Theatre, but they're willing to take a chance. For $100, they'll listen to his banter and bragging, his dreams and delights.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1994 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The imagery in the title of Peter Dee's "A Sea of White Horses"--the whitecaps on ocean waves--is pure early '70s, when the sea as element was crucial to pop philosophy, just as it had been half a century before to Eugene O'Neill. Dee's drama seems just as period specific and cliched. Director Roosevelt Blankenship Jr.'
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