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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1990
The column by Tad Szulc ("Old East Bloc Hostilities Surface as Threats to Infant Democracies," Opinion, Dec. 17) is the first rational commentary on the events in Eastern Europe since the media released their gush of ooze over the outbreak of freedom. It should be obligatory reading for our national policy planners. The main difference between 1939 and 1989 is the thin blanket of economic prosperity which today keeps Europe's underclass from running through the streets behind beer hall orators and bemedaled generals.
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TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Diane Haithman
BERLIN - My husband, Alan, and I were on our way from L.A. to Budapest, Hungary - our first trip to Eastern Europe. We had to change planes somewhere, and that somewhere happened to be Berlin, a frequent hub for travel to Northern and Eastern European destinations. We had heard that Berlin was an up-and-coming artists' community, often compared with L.A. Instead of sentencing ourselves to a long layover at the airport, we decided to spend a long weekend in Berlin. We expected three days of prowling contemporary art galleries mixed with sobering visits to historical sites (the Brandenburg Gate, the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, a glimpse of where the Berlin Wall once stood)
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BUSINESS
March 2, 2009 | Associated Press
German Chancellor Angela Merkel and other European Union leaders flatly rejected a new multibillion-euro bailout for Eastern Europe on Sunday, suggesting that additional aid be given to struggling nations only on a case-by-case basis. Germany and the Netherlands also shot down suggestions that Eastern European countries that have seen their currencies plummet be given a quick entry to the euro, which has remained strong against the U.S. dollar and Japanese yen.
WORLD
March 30, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - In speeches and remarks last week in Europe, President Obama made it clear that he considers Russia's annexation of Crimea a very big deal. But he also defined what it's not: an overwhelming national security threat, such as the U.S.-Soviet rivalry in the Cold War, that would trump all other foreign policy priorities. In appearances before European Union leaders, Obama called for a sustained effort to isolate Russia to discourage further encroachment on its neighbors, but emphasized that Russia is not the West's top geopolitical challenge.
OPINION
September 24, 1989
Following your excellent coverage of the events taking place in Eastern Europe, especially the escape of the hundreds or thousands of young East Germans from Hungary to the West, I am reliving the moments of joy and euphoria that I felt when I escaped from Hungary to Austria with my brother during the night of Nov. 24, 1956. It is an indescribable feeling that can only be compared to giving birth to a child. I am very proud of Hungary and would like to thank Austria for helping the refugees of Eastern Europe all these years.
NEWS
August 20, 1991
The hard-liners who seized power in the Kremlin have long lamented the Soviets' losing control of Eastern Europe. But whether a Soviet invasion is likely remains open to question. Soviet troops have withdrawn or are in process of withdrawing from Eastern European nations, which would make it difficult to launch a military operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989
I have been very pleased with your extensive coverage this year of the rapid changes occurring in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union concerning both domestic and foreign policy. Several times, however, I have been bothered by historical inaccuracies in articles discussing the so-called Brezhnev Doctrine. The idea of limited sovereignty (circumscribed by the U.S.S.R.) in Eastern Europe does not stem solely from Brezhnev's justification of the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1968.
NEWS
October 30, 1990
Working-level representatives of the world's 24 wealthiest industrial countries assemble today in the Belgian capital to decide how to apportion $272 million in aid to the emerging democracies of Eastern Europe. High on the agenda will be whether to add Romania to the list of recipient nations, which now includes Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia.
TRAVEL
October 8, 2006
I almost wish Susan Spano had not written "Budapest, So Nouveau" [Unexplored Europe, Oct. 1]. I just kind of hope too many Americans don't discover it. I've had nothing but delightful multiple trips the past several years to Croatia, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Romania and Poland. Having first seen several of these countries as a college student in 1970, it's been a delight to see them now and watch them reawaken. Where so much of Western Europe looks as it does here in the U.S., with vast freeways and mega-malls, to visit Eastern Europe is to step back in time to a slower pace, beautiful, mostly untouched countrysides, and to meet genuinely warm people.
TRAVEL
July 2, 1995
Reversing a policy that it has followed since the Berlin Wall fell, Avis Germany is now letting travelers take cars into most Eastern European countries. Auto Europe, a car rental reservation service based in Portland, Maine, is also permitting its cars to make the trip. Most major rental car companies have not allowed their vehicles to be taken from Western to Eastern Europe since 1989 because of the high rate of theft.
OPINION
March 30, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Russian troops are massing menacingly on Ukraine's eastern border. The civil war in Syria is still raging, and 33,000 American troops fight on in Afghanistan. So where is Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel headed this week? To Hawaii - for a meeting with defense ministers from Asia, the region the Obama administration still considers its top foreign policy priority. "Asia is one of the great success stories of the world," Hagel told me in an interview in his Pentagon office last week.
WORLD
March 21, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - In their response to Russia's seizure of Crimea, Western officials are working out a division of labor: Washington is taking the lead on tough sanctions, while Europe focuses on drawing Ukraine away from Moscow's political orbit. This approach has become apparent this week, say Western officials and analysts, as Western governments have huddled to figure out how to deter Russian President Vladimir Putin from grabbing the remainder of Ukraine and encroaching on other countries in Eastern Europe.
WORLD
March 19, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Sergei L. Loiko
WASHINGTON - Frustrated by the failure of Western sanctions and diplomacy to stop Russia from seizing Crimea, the Obama administration and its allies scrambled Wednesday to devise new and tougher economic penalties in hope of preventing President Vladimir Putin from moving forces into Ukraine's eastern territory. A day after Putin signed a treaty to annex Crimea, U.S. officials acknowledged that Ukraine has lost the region. Pro-Russia forces seized control of two Ukrainian naval bases in the Black Sea peninsula on Wednesday, including the naval headquarters in Sevastopol.
OPINION
March 6, 2014 | By Gary Schmitt
There are heated debates here and abroad about what exact policies should be put in place in response to Russian President Vladimir Putin's decision to violate Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity by sending Russian troops to Crimea. And although that debate is obviously important, we shouldn't ignore the lessons from the past that brought us to this point and, in turn, should help guide policies going forward. The first is that Putin paid no price for the Russian invasion of Georgia in 2008.
WORLD
March 5, 2014 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon is sending six additional fighter jets and an air refueling tanker to Lithuania, a move meant to reassure allies in Eastern Europe of U.S. military support when Russia's incursion in Ukraine has raised fears about Moscow's intentions. The deployment will mean ten U.S. F-15s are in Lithuania. Four had arrived in Lithuania in January as part of a regular rotation and are scheduled to leave at the end of April. The jets will participate in NATO's Baltic Air Policing mission, a 10-year-old alliance effort meant to deter Russian violations of air space over Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia.
OPINION
March 4, 2014 | By Edward W. Walker
The causes of the unfolding crisis in Ukraine are many, but most fundamentally its roots can be found in an enormously consequential decision made by the United States and its allies in the early 1990s. Faced with a strategic challenge of constructing a new security architecture for post-Cold War Europe, the decision was made to embark on a program of gradual NATO expansion to the east. A first round of accession took place in 1999, with membership for the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland.
WORLD
March 2, 2014 | By Paul Richter, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - When President Obama surveyed foreign priorities in his State of the Union speech, Iran topped the list, along with Mideast peace and the administration's shift of attention to East Asia. Europe got only glancing mention, with nothing about threats to its security. Suddenly, Russian troop movements in Ukraine, which U.S. officials now are calling an invasion, have shuffled the president's foreign policy priorities and set up what Nicholas Burns, a former undersecretary of state, called “the most difficult international crisis of his presidency.” “This goes directly to vital American interests,” said Burns, who has worked for presidents of both parties.
WORLD
March 1, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - President Obama has a variety of ways he can make good on his threat to make Russia pay "costs" for its military intervention in Ukraine. But it's not clear any of them will make a difference to Russian President Vladimir Putin, or whether they might simply underscore the United States' relatively weak hand in the unfolding Ukraine crisis. The U.S. and its European allies can take steps to isolate Russia diplomatically, which would undermine Putin's claim that his country is again ascendant as a world leader.
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