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NEWS
July 31, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As East Europeans examine the social scars left by Communist population policies, abortion is emerging as more of a demographic than a moral issue. While emotional arguments rage in the United States over when life begins and who should control a woman's body, the controversy within the aspiring democracies struggling to establish themselves in this part of the world hinges more on numbers and nationalism.
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NEWS
August 26, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tadeusz Durzynski has a bad case of vacation blues, even though he is one of the lucky ones not marooned at home. Durzynski is spending two weeks with his family at this woodsy resort in central Poland, just as he has every August for the past 15 years. The problem is that none of his friends are here, and the no-frills holiday is setting him back nearly two months' pay. "This is capitalism," the bushy-browed tractor mechanic moaned during a stroll through a cluster of deserted cabins.
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NEWS
December 11, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why did events come out so differently this year in Eastern Europe than in China? Why did the movements toward democratic changes succeed in Warsaw, Prague, Budapest and East Berlin while failing in Beijing? Scholars point to several factors that help explain why the Chinese regime was willing and able to carry out a forceful crackdown while East European governments were not.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1992 | WADE DANIELS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Wade Daniels is managing editor of Prognosis, an English-language newspaper based in Prague.
Laszlo Hegedus has been in the right place at the right time for a long time. After growing up in Budapest, Hungary, in the heart of the communist era, he has become one of the most important figures in big-name rock concerts in today's Eastern Europe, doing for this part of the world what his late friend Bill Graham did for so long in the United States.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Eastern Europe may not be the boundless market for U.S. products that many manufacturers envision, a new study suggests. Consumers in the region want U.S. fast food and Japanese electronics but hope to buy most other goods from Western European producers, according to a survey of 600 people in Czechoslovakia, eastern Germany, Hungary, Poland, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | BLAINE HARDEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Sammy needs a haircut. The last time he needed a haircut--that was in January--he bit his hairdresser. Sammy has an appointment here at Kosmetika, a downtown salon where most clients do not even bark under the blow-dryer, let alone bite. Naturally, not everyone is looking forward to Sammy's arrival. Yet he is a longtime customer, and he does live with a Budapest actress. The schnauzer is due at 1 p.m.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea struck Redondo Beach Councilman Terry Ward last month like a peal from the Liberty Bell: A constituent, a Czechoslovakian immigrant, had asked if the beachside city might be interested in becoming a sister city of Prague, the capital of his homeland. "I thought, 'My God, what a terrific idea!' " Ward said, recalling his pleasure at the thought of casting a local vote of confidence in the recent democratic reforms in Eastern Europe. "It touched me deeply.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tadeusz Durzynski has a bad case of vacation blues, even though he is one of the lucky ones not marooned at home. Durzynski is spending two weeks with his family at this woodsy resort in central Poland, just as he has every August for the past 15 years. The problem is that none of his friends are here, and the no-frills holiday is setting him back nearly two months' pay. "This is capitalism," the bushy-browed tractor mechanic moaned during a stroll through a cluster of deserted cabins.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1992 | WADE DANIELS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Wade Daniels is managing editor of Prognosis, an English-language newspaper based in Prague.
Laszlo Hegedus has been in the right place at the right time for a long time. After growing up in Budapest, Hungary, in the heart of the communist era, he has become one of the most important figures in big-name rock concerts in today's Eastern Europe, doing for this part of the world what his late friend Bill Graham did for so long in the United States.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flower-festooned Maypoles have sprouted in the wake of Communist Party propaganda posters as East Europeans have traded in hollow testimonials to labor for traditional May Day celebrations of new life after the long, barren winter. It is a change heavy with symbolism for those recently rid of an ideology that never took root.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Eastern Europe may not be the boundless market for U.S. products that many manufacturers envision, a new study suggests. Consumers in the region want U.S. fast food and Japanese electronics but hope to buy most other goods from Western European producers, according to a survey of 600 people in Czechoslovakia, eastern Germany, Hungary, Poland, the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Food prices are rising. Jobs are disappearing. City-dwellers are being slowly poisoned by polluted air and toxic water. To bear up under the depressing burden of day-to-day living, Eastern Europeans are seeking solace in their cigarettes. While tobacco sales are declining in Western Europe and the United States, a reverse trend has developed in the reform belt of the Continent as increasing millions salve their stress and insecurity with a smoke.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As East Europeans examine the social scars left by Communist population policies, abortion is emerging as more of a demographic than a moral issue. While emotional arguments rage in the United States over when life begins and who should control a woman's body, the controversy within the aspiring democracies struggling to establish themselves in this part of the world hinges more on numbers and nationalism.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | BLAINE HARDEN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Sammy needs a haircut. The last time he needed a haircut--that was in January--he bit his hairdresser. Sammy has an appointment here at Kosmetika, a downtown salon where most clients do not even bark under the blow-dryer, let alone bite. Naturally, not everyone is looking forward to Sammy's arrival. Yet he is a longtime customer, and he does live with a Budapest actress. The schnauzer is due at 1 p.m.
NEWS
May 1, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flower-festooned Maypoles have sprouted in the wake of Communist Party propaganda posters as East Europeans have traded in hollow testimonials to labor for traditional May Day celebrations of new life after the long, barren winter. It is a change heavy with symbolism for those recently rid of an ideology that never took root.
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The idea struck Redondo Beach Councilman Terry Ward last month like a peal from the Liberty Bell: A constituent, a Czechoslovakian immigrant, had asked if the beachside city might be interested in becoming a sister city of Prague, the capital of his homeland. "I thought, 'My God, what a terrific idea!' " Ward said, recalling his pleasure at the thought of casting a local vote of confidence in the recent democratic reforms in Eastern Europe. "It touched me deeply.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Food prices are rising. Jobs are disappearing. City-dwellers are being slowly poisoned by polluted air and toxic water. To bear up under the depressing burden of day-to-day living, Eastern Europeans are seeking solace in their cigarettes. While tobacco sales are declining in Western Europe and the United States, a reverse trend has developed in the reform belt of the Continent as increasing millions salve their stress and insecurity with a smoke.
TRAVEL
March 3, 2002 | KARIN ESTERHAMMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A trip to England from July 11 to 23 features a day of vintage airplanes at the Duxford Flying Legends Air Show and a day at the Farnborough Air Show. World War II experts will lecture travelers on visits to Cambridge University, the American Cemetery in Maddingly (where there will be a wreath-laying ceremony), Stratford-on-Avon and Warwick Castle. Five nights are scheduled in London, where travelers will tour the War Museum and Churchill's War Cabinet Rooms, and the Battle of Britain Underground Operations Center in Uxbridge.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Why did events come out so differently this year in Eastern Europe than in China? Why did the movements toward democratic changes succeed in Warsaw, Prague, Budapest and East Berlin while failing in Beijing? Scholars point to several factors that help explain why the Chinese regime was willing and able to carry out a forceful crackdown while East European governments were not.
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