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NEWS
June 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the minister of education announced last fall that the teaching of Russian was no longer compulsory in Hungarian schools, students celebrated by shredding their Russian textbooks. "Russian was forced on us," student Krisztina Karoly, 20, told a reporter recently. "It will always be considered the language of oppression." She said that English is "suddenly very fashionable, but there is a big shortage of teachers."
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NEWS
March 23, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five Eastern European universities and four U.S. colleges, including Orange County's Chapman College, will announce a pioneering educational alliance today designed to strengthen ties between their faculties and students and provide technical resources for both education and economic change in Eastern Europe. The creation of the consortium is scheduled to be announced at a news conference at the United Nations and concludes a three-week U.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five Eastern European universities and four colleges in the United States will announce a pioneering educational alliance today designed to strengthen ties between their faculties and students and provide technical resources for both education and economic change in Eastern Europe. The creation of the consortium, whose membership includes Chapman College in Orange County, is scheduled to be announced at a news conference at the United Nations and concludes a three-week U.S.
NEWS
June 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the minister of education announced last fall that the teaching of Russian was no longer compulsory in Hungarian schools, students celebrated by shredding their Russian textbooks. "Russian was forced on us," student Krisztina Karoly, 20, told a reporter recently. "It will always be considered the language of oppression." She said that English is "suddenly very fashionable, but there is a big shortage of teachers."
BUSINESS
February 18, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. economy, it would seem at first glance, is doing just fine. Communist governments topple across Eastern Europe. The Soviet economy--once an ambitious U.S. rival--combats chaos. By contrast, most Americans' worries seem trivial: a spurt of inflation, a bout of unemployment, a drop in sales. All in all, "the U.S. is probably the richest country that ever was--by a long shot," declares John H. Makin, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When an independent Ukraine starts using its new money this year, the bills will be the handiwork of a Canadian printing concern, Canadian Bank Note Co. Canadian Bank Note will print 1.5 billion bills for Ukraine, enough paper to fill 39 jumbo jets, according to corporate secretary Shirley Arends. She said the company hopes to use the Ukrainian contract as a jumping-off point for negotiating currency-printing deals with the other new countries that were until recently Soviet republics.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five Eastern European universities and four U.S. colleges, including Orange County's Chapman College, will announce a pioneering educational alliance today designed to strengthen ties between their faculties and students and provide technical resources for both education and economic change in Eastern Europe. The creation of the consortium is scheduled to be announced at a news conference at the United Nations and concludes a three-week U.S.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Five Eastern European universities and four colleges in the United States will announce a pioneering educational alliance today designed to strengthen ties between their faculties and students and provide technical resources for both education and economic change in Eastern Europe. The creation of the consortium, whose membership includes Chapman College in Orange County, is scheduled to be announced at a news conference at the United Nations and concludes a three-week U.S.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1990 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. economy, it would seem at first glance, is doing just fine. Communist governments topple across Eastern Europe. The Soviet economy--once an ambitious U.S. rival--combats chaos. By contrast, most Americans' worries seem trivial: a spurt of inflation, a bout of unemployment, a drop in sales. All in all, "the U.S. is probably the richest country that ever was--by a long shot," declares John H. Makin, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington.
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