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Eastern Europe Elections

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NEWS
January 2, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the extraordinary drama of the past year in Eastern Europe, the nations of the region enter the new decade not so much transformed as in transition. East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and even Romania have all broken, probably irrevocably, with the Soviet model of one-party Communist rule. But they are still a long way from putting down roots in the Western, liberal democratic political tradition to which most of their 110 million citizens apparently aspire.
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NEWS
June 5, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eastern Europe is ready now to look beyond its first democratic elections and prepare to enter the community of nations its people have yearned to join for two generations. But don't look for any overnight miracles. That, at least, is the word from those who ought to know--the men and women now charged with rebuilding societies in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and East Germany.
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NEWS
June 5, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eastern Europe is ready now to look beyond its first democratic elections and prepare to enter the community of nations its people have yearned to join for two generations. But don't look for any overnight miracles. That, at least, is the word from those who ought to know--the men and women now charged with rebuilding societies in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and East Germany.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the extraordinary drama of the past year in Eastern Europe, the nations of the region enter the new decade not so much transformed as in transition. East Germany, Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and even Romania have all broken, probably irrevocably, with the Soviet model of one-party Communist rule. But they are still a long way from putting down roots in the Western, liberal democratic political tradition to which most of their 110 million citizens apparently aspire.
NEWS
June 9, 1985
Hungarian turnout was heavy in parliamentary and municipal elections under a new law requiring at least two candidates for each seat--a rare choice in Eastern Europe. Elections had been uncontested in Hungary since 1949, one year after the Communist Party consolidated power.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
President Bush, praising Poland for holding Eastern Europe's freest elections and for giving the country's beleaguered economy an injection of free enterprise, said Tuesday that he will offer the nation an economic aid package when he visits Warsaw next month. "We would like very much to help Poland," Bush said at a press conference. "I am very encouraged with what's happened in Poland." Bush said that the United States will insist that Poland adopt additional economic reforms to make certain that the money will be "well spent" but he provided few additional details.
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