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Eastern Europe Emigration

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NEWS
December 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers slung with automatic rifles and night-vision glasses stand watch over frozen vineyards. The skeletal vines, trussed into gnarled bundles, rock noiselessly in the wind of a moonlit night. A rustle in the frosty underbrush draws a beam of light, illuminating three sets of startled eyes. A flash of fear and tension grips the watchers but quickly eases into a nervous laugh. This time, the eerie stillness has been disturbed by wild hares.
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NEWS
September 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red and green pins dot the six-foot-wide map of the former Soviet Union--all spots where sizable Jewish communities remain, where economic collapse could bring political unrest and ethnic conflict but where Israel now has its own agents able to help the Jews to flee. "There must be the option for every Jew to leave and to come to Israel, and I can say now that there is," Baruch Gur, the head of the Jewish Agency's Eastern Europe department, declared with a sweep of his hand across the map.
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NEWS
September 26, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany cannot afford to take in hundreds of thousands fleeing poverty in Eastern Europe and the Third World, a top official in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government said Tuesday in a plea for help in stemming the refugee tide. As many as half of the 400,000 refugees expected in Western Europe this year are likely to settle in West Germany, aggravating social tensions already strained by the costs of German reunification, Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said.
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hands folded, the little family matriarch lifted her head slightly and began to count. There was her husband, her son, his wife and their three children. There was another son, a daughter and seven more grandchildren. "We're all going together," concluded Lydia Stahlbaum, who works in the office of the local collective farm in this town in Kazakhstan. "I think we will be in Germany by spring."
NEWS
November 9, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hands folded, the little family matriarch lifted her head slightly and began to count. There was her husband, her son, his wife and their three children. There was another son, a daughter and seven more grandchildren. "We're all going together," concluded Lydia Stahlbaum, who works in the office of the local collective farm in this town in Kazakhstan. "I think we will be in Germany by spring."
NEWS
September 20, 1992 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Red and green pins dot the six-foot-wide map of the former Soviet Union--all spots where sizable Jewish communities remain, where economic collapse could bring political unrest and ethnic conflict but where Israel now has its own agents able to help the Jews to flee. "There must be the option for every Jew to leave and to come to Israel, and I can say now that there is," Baruch Gur, the head of the Jewish Agency's Eastern Europe department, declared with a sweep of his hand across the map.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers slung with automatic rifles and night-vision glasses stand watch over frozen vineyards. The skeletal vines, trussed into gnarled bundles, rock noiselessly in the wind of a moonlit night. A rustle in the frosty underbrush draws a beam of light, illuminating three sets of startled eyes. A flash of fear and tension grips the watchers but quickly eases into a nervous laugh. This time, the eerie stillness has been disturbed by wild hares.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany cannot afford to take in hundreds of thousands fleeing poverty in Eastern Europe and the Third World, a top official in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government said Tuesday in a plea for help in stemming the refugee tide. As many as half of the 400,000 refugees expected in Western Europe this year are likely to settle in West Germany, aggravating social tensions already strained by the costs of German reunification, Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said.
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