Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEastern Europe Health
IN THE NEWS

Eastern Europe Health

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The World Health Organization is planning a new campaign to fight AIDS in Eastern European countries, which only recently began reporting cases of the deadly disease, officials said Friday. Dr. Jonathan Mann, head of the U.N. agency's AIDS program, said East Bloc countries form the "new frontiers of the global epidemic" that has claimed hundreds of thousands of victims, primarily in the Americas, Africa and West Europe.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's raging tuberculosis epidemic has spread to Scandinavia through emigration and threatens other Western countries, including the United States, officials of the World Health Organization warned Tuesday. The alarming rate of new TB cases reported in Russia and other Eastern European countries last year underscores earlier cautions that collapsing health care systems in the former Communist world have caused the disease, which already kills 3 million in the world each year, to flourish.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its broken windows, crumbling staircases and sagging perimeter fence, the National Tuberculosis Center on tree-shaded Gorodskaya Street stands as a fitting monument to the lofty and elusive goals of the Soviet medical system. Tuberculosis is epidemic in this and other former Soviet republics, but the costly and ineffectual treatment regime bequeathed by Communist-era planners is proving more hindrance than help in efforts to check the disease's spread.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With its broken windows, crumbling staircases and sagging perimeter fence, the National Tuberculosis Center on tree-shaded Gorodskaya Street stands as a fitting monument to the lofty and elusive goals of the Soviet medical system. Tuberculosis is epidemic in this and other former Soviet republics, but the costly and ineffectual treatment regime bequeathed by Communist-era planners is proving more hindrance than help in efforts to check the disease's spread.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's raging tuberculosis epidemic has spread to Scandinavia through emigration and threatens other Western countries, including the United States, officials of the World Health Organization warned Tuesday. The alarming rate of new TB cases reported in Russia and other Eastern European countries last year underscores earlier cautions that collapsing health care systems in the former Communist world have caused the disease, which already kills 3 million in the world each year, to flourish.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This day, like most days, thin, pale children crowd the corridor that serves as a waiting room at Dr. Ladislav Peychl's clinic. Some lie quietly in their parents' arms. Some wander about fretfully. All cough. Outside, a light rain falls, dampening the ever-present soot into a blackish mud. The rain is laden with acid, etching ever-deeper lines into buildings and adding a few more dead trees to the ranks of denuded trunks that line Teplice's streets each spring.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2006 | From Associated Press
Seeking to reassure people that chicken is safe to eat, companies that raise chickens said Thursday that they would test every flock for bird flu before the birds are slaughtered. Companies that account for more than 90% of the nearly 10 billion chickens produced in 2005 in the U.S. have signed up for the testing program and said more were expected to follow, according to the National Chicken Council, a trade group that represents producers.
NEWS
June 19, 1993 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the leaders of the 12 European Community countries meet in Copenhagen on Monday and Tuesday, their poor cousins from Eastern Europe will be watching with particular interest. EC leaders, who rarely miss a chance to sing the virtues of Eastern Europe's economic reforms, will be asked to reward their neighbors by agreeing to buy more of their goods.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1992 | ROBERT ROSENBLATT and JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawrence A. Kudlow, an enthusiastically conservative economist fromthe Reagan White House, was flabbergasted as he watched Paul Tsongas on television the other day and heard the unabashed, pro-business views of the Democratic candidate for president. "I know Tsongas is always saying the Reagan-Bush years were bad--but he's sounding a lot like Reagan to me," says Kudlow, who now works for the Bear Stearns & Co. brokerage firm in New York.
NEWS
February 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
The World Health Organization is planning a new campaign to fight AIDS in Eastern European countries, which only recently began reporting cases of the deadly disease, officials said Friday. Dr. Jonathan Mann, head of the U.N. agency's AIDS program, said East Bloc countries form the "new frontiers of the global epidemic" that has claimed hundreds of thousands of victims, primarily in the Americas, Africa and West Europe.
NEWS
January 22, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
This day, like most days, thin, pale children crowd the corridor that serves as a waiting room at Dr. Ladislav Peychl's clinic. Some lie quietly in their parents' arms. Some wander about fretfully. All cough. Outside, a light rain falls, dampening the ever-present soot into a blackish mud. The rain is laden with acid, etching ever-deeper lines into buildings and adding a few more dead trees to the ranks of denuded trunks that line Teplice's streets each spring.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|