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ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The newly independent republic of Croatia was desperate for international recognition. To curry favor with the German government, which was willing to advance its case before the European Community, the state-run Croatian TV network banned all movies about World Wars I and II that presented a negative portrayal of Germany. In Hungary, a legislator denounced TV weather broadcasts for continuing to forecast dry, sunny days.
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NEWS
May 17, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the former Communists won parliamentary elections here more than two years ago, a giddy Jerzy Urban appeared at party headquarters with a gigantic bottle of champagne. The ubiquitous spokesman for Poland's last authoritarian regime was feeling so self-satisfied that he even posed for photographers with his tongue sticking out.
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NEWS
March 4, 1990 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
When Czechoslovak President Vaclav Havel toured Washington recently, it was difficult to say what amazed people more: the visible evidence of another great gash in the Iron Curtain, or the spectacle of a nation turning over its highest political office to a playwright. For a sense of how alien that concept is to the American political tradition, try to imagine Arthur Miller in the White House, or David Mamet. Or Saul Bellow or Tom Wolfe in the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
December 18, 1994 | DOINA CHIACU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Before communism crumbled, immigrants from the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe flocked to the United States for freedom and democracy. Today they come for something else. "Now you have people who just want to get rich, it doesn't matter how," said Ena Ghyka of Arlington, Va., who fled Romania in 1976. "It's a different breed, completely different," said Irene Nikitin, 71, of San Francisco, a World War II refugee from Kiev.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top European policy-makers have quietly warned the Bush Administration that the economic and political integration of Europe is moving far more rapidly than had been expected, a development that could have important implications for U.S.-European relations.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government analysts and Bush Administration policy makers are increasingly worried that the huge social and economic problems of the freshly liberated East Bloc nations could push some of them away from freedom and into the grip of new authoritarian regimes. Senior Administration officials still ardently support the East Bloc reformers, but they say the process of democratization is so fragile it could fall victim to political fragmentation, aggravated by serious economic strains.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1990 | PATT MORRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a comfort to know that in an astonishing world where political tornadoes have swept from Eastern Europe to Panama in the span of half a year, some things do not change. Oliver L. North, among them.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Marking a watershed between the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, this week's U.S.-Soviet summit will have a two-part agenda: It will cover "old" business, especially arms control, and "new" business, particularly the shape of a more unified Europe. President Bush's first priority will be to focus on the old issues. "We want to get these deals finalized," he said of agreements made in the strategic arms reduction talks (START) and other arms negotiations.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the stuff of techno-fiction novels, but to some U.S. government analysts, it could become a post-Cold War nightmare--a mutiny by Soviet troops left in Germany that threatens to destroy Europe's new order. As the Persian Gulf War moves inexorably toward its conclusion, President Bush is being warned that growing instability in the Soviet Union could upset the peace in Europe.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is democracy rising like a phoenix out of the ashes and disgrace of communism? Is democracy on a relentless roll? Some optimists often paint the world that way. But it is a simplistic look at a complex notion. In his speech to the United Nations in mid-September, for example, President Bush extolled the Western Hemisphere as a vast sea of democracy. Fidel Castro, the President insisted, was "the lone holdout in an otherwise democratic hemisphere."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The newly independent republic of Croatia was desperate for international recognition. To curry favor with the German government, which was willing to advance its case before the European Community, the state-run Croatian TV network banned all movies about World Wars I and II that presented a negative portrayal of Germany. In Hungary, a legislator denounced TV weather broadcasts for continuing to forecast dry, sunny days.
NEWS
May 6, 1992 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl warned Tuesday that the potential instability of Eastern Europe and the republics of the former Soviet Union make it vital to keep American troops in Europe. In a few stark and clear sentences, the German leader offered his explanation to a puzzle troubling many Americans: What is the point of deploying American troops in Europe after the collapse of communism and the end of the Cold War?
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is democracy rising like a phoenix out of the ashes and disgrace of communism? Is democracy on a relentless roll? Some optimists often paint the world that way. But it is a simplistic look at a complex notion. In his speech to the United Nations in mid-September, for example, President Bush extolled the Western Hemisphere as a vast sea of democracy. Fidel Castro, the President insisted, was "the lone holdout in an otherwise democratic hemisphere."
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the stuff of techno-fiction novels, but to some U.S. government analysts, it could become a post-Cold War nightmare--a mutiny by Soviet troops left in Germany that threatens to destroy Europe's new order. As the Persian Gulf War moves inexorably toward its conclusion, President Bush is being warned that growing instability in the Soviet Union could upset the peace in Europe.
NEWS
November 19, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
George P. Shultz sauntered by, heading to his office where he is working on his memoirs, while Michal Wyganowski and Wojciech Iwanczyk, rising stars in the Polish foreign ministry, chatted on a shaded bench at the Hoover Institution. In an auditorium down a flight of stairs, Edwin Meese III was telling an assembled crowd why drugs should never be legalized. Wyganowski, Iwanczyk and 10 other Polish and Hungarian diplomats could catch up with the former attorney general at a dinner that evening.
NEWS
June 5, 1990 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eastern Europe is ready now to look beyond its first democratic elections and prepare to enter the community of nations its people have yearned to join for two generations. But don't look for any overnight miracles. That, at least, is the word from those who ought to know--the men and women now charged with rebuilding societies in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and East Germany.
NEWS
December 14, 1989 | THOMAS B. ROSENSTIEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Americans have stopped paying close attention to news events in Eastern Europe, saying the story is confusing, the meaning of events unclear and the news too repetitive, according to a survey to be released today. Yet it apparently would be wrong to infer that Americans consider the changes unimportant. By far, more Americans believe the situation in Eastern Europe to be the most significant news event of the year, even though they followed other stories more closely.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, speaking with a rare poignancy over the weekend, attributed the upheaval in Eastern Europe to the failure of the Communist parties there, all of them the Soviet Union's proteges and allies, to embark earlier on essential political and economic reforms.
NEWS
May 27, 1990 | ROBERT C. TOTH and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Marking a watershed between the Cold War and post-Cold War eras, this week's U.S.-Soviet summit will have a two-part agenda: It will cover "old" business, especially arms control, and "new" business, particularly the shape of a more unified Europe. President Bush's first priority will be to focus on the old issues. "We want to get these deals finalized," he said of agreements made in the strategic arms reduction talks (START) and other arms negotiations.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top European policy-makers have quietly warned the Bush Administration that the economic and political integration of Europe is moving far more rapidly than had been expected, a development that could have important implications for U.S.-European relations.
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