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Eastern Europe Trade

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BUSINESS
June 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
East Bloc consumers recognize a wide range of Western brand names even though many of the products have not been actively marketed or may not be available in their countries, a survey says. But many U.S. brands ranked much lower on quality than on name recognition, raising disturbing questions for American exporters. The lagging quality perception could give Japanese and Western European competitors an advantage.
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NEWS
June 7, 1991 | Associated Press
Vice President Dan Quayle promised Thursday that the United States will press Western nations to open their markets to former East Bloc countries suffering from a collapse in exports to the Soviet Union. Speaking to a symposium of the Conference for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Quayle said that lowering the trade barriers will be a "top priority" during next month's economic summit in London of the Group of Seven industrialized democracies. Quayle is the highest-ranking U.S.
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NEWS
January 23, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, bowing to pressure from America's major allies, has agreed to back a gradual easing of restrictions on the sale of Western goods and technology to Eastern Europe in response to the rapid political changes there, officials said Monday. The decision, made at a meeting of the National Security Council, initially will affect only the sale of some advanced computers, machine tools and telecommunications equipment to Poland and Hungary.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, whose job it is to help capitalism take root in Eastern Europe, the timing of Monday's inaugural board meeting in London is less than auspicious. After the initial euphoria of freedom, Eastern Europe believes it is not getting the help it needs from its new friends in the West. The world's biggest companies, at one time thought likely to invest heavily in the newly opened markets of Eastern Europe, are staying away in droves.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders from the 10 member nations of Comecon, the Soviet-led trading bloc, agreed Tuesday on the need to overhaul their antiquated organization but differed sharply on the pace and extent of the reforms required. In a new spirit of freewheeling exchange in Eastern Europe, differences were aired openly during the first day of a two-day Comecon meeting here.
NEWS
December 29, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new age in East European economics dawns Tuesday, when the nations of the Soviet trading club pack away the mirrors they have used to balance their checkbooks for four decades. It will be every new democracy for itself in 1991, when the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, or Comecon, starts keeping its books in real money, instead of the synthetic "transferable ruble" that has been its common, unconvertible currency for internal wheeling and dealing.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adjusting to a year of sweeping political change, East European leaders committed themselves Wednesday to a major overhaul of the Soviet-led trading bloc, Comecon. The leaders agreed to scrap the cumbersome procedure of trying to coordinate rigid five-year plans and other elements of Communist centrally planned trade. They also decided to link trade more closely to the marketplace and to work toward a more realistic system of pricing.
NEWS
June 7, 1991 | Associated Press
Vice President Dan Quayle promised Thursday that the United States will press Western nations to open their markets to former East Bloc countries suffering from a collapse in exports to the Soviet Union. Speaking to a symposium of the Conference for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Quayle said that lowering the trade barriers will be a "top priority" during next month's economic summit in London of the Group of Seven industrialized democracies. Quayle is the highest-ranking U.S.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Member nations of the Soviet-led trading group Comecon begin a crucial two-day meeting here today that is expected to radically alter both the form and role of the organization, which has come to symbolize the economic failures of Communist central planning. New, reform-minded governments in several East European countries have demanded an end to the fossilized trading arrangements and other restrictions that have dominated Comecon and strangled growth virtually since its inception 40 years ago.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stunning political and economic changes now sweeping Eastern Europe may be about to claim their first institutional casualty: the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, the Eastern countries' common market. The 10-member council, known as Comecon, has been in trouble for several years as East European countries chafed under trading terms with the Soviet Union that too often left them the losers. Hungary and Poland long have been pressing for reforms.
NEWS
December 29, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new age in East European economics dawns Tuesday, when the nations of the Soviet trading club pack away the mirrors they have used to balance their checkbooks for four decades. It will be every new democracy for itself in 1991, when the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, or Comecon, starts keeping its books in real money, instead of the synthetic "transferable ruble" that has been its common, unconvertible currency for internal wheeling and dealing.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
East Bloc consumers recognize a wide range of Western brand names even though many of the products have not been actively marketed or may not be available in their countries, a survey says. But many U.S. brands ranked much lower on quality than on name recognition, raising disturbing questions for American exporters. The lagging quality perception could give Japanese and Western European competitors an advantage.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its major economic allies agreed in principle Friday to ease restrictions on the sale of sensitive technology to East European countries, but they remained sharply divided over how rapidly to relax the restraints. After a contentious two-day meeting, State Department officials announced that the Western governments had reached consensus on the need to liberalize current rules governing high-technology sales to the former East Bloc. The closed-door session was held in Paris.
NEWS
January 23, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration, bowing to pressure from America's major allies, has agreed to back a gradual easing of restrictions on the sale of Western goods and technology to Eastern Europe in response to the rapid political changes there, officials said Monday. The decision, made at a meeting of the National Security Council, initially will affect only the sale of some advanced computers, machine tools and telecommunications equipment to Poland and Hungary.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adjusting to a year of sweeping political change, East European leaders committed themselves Wednesday to a major overhaul of the Soviet-led trading bloc, Comecon. The leaders agreed to scrap the cumbersome procedure of trying to coordinate rigid five-year plans and other elements of Communist centrally planned trade. They also decided to link trade more closely to the marketplace and to work toward a more realistic system of pricing.
BUSINESS
January 10, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders from the 10 member nations of Comecon, the Soviet-led trading bloc, agreed Tuesday on the need to overhaul their antiquated organization but differed sharply on the pace and extent of the reforms required. In a new spirit of freewheeling exchange in Eastern Europe, differences were aired openly during the first day of a two-day Comecon meeting here.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | JOEL HAVEMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, whose job it is to help capitalism take root in Eastern Europe, the timing of Monday's inaugural board meeting in London is less than auspicious. After the initial euphoria of freedom, Eastern Europe believes it is not getting the help it needs from its new friends in the West. The world's biggest companies, at one time thought likely to invest heavily in the newly opened markets of Eastern Europe, are staying away in droves.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1990 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and its major economic allies agreed in principle Friday to ease restrictions on the sale of sensitive technology to East European countries, but they remained sharply divided over how rapidly to relax the restraints. After a contentious two-day meeting, State Department officials announced that the Western governments had reached consensus on the need to liberalize current rules governing high-technology sales to the former East Bloc. The closed-door session was held in Paris.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1990 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Member nations of the Soviet-led trading group Comecon begin a crucial two-day meeting here today that is expected to radically alter both the form and role of the organization, which has come to symbolize the economic failures of Communist central planning. New, reform-minded governments in several East European countries have demanded an end to the fossilized trading arrangements and other restrictions that have dominated Comecon and strangled growth virtually since its inception 40 years ago.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1989 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The stunning political and economic changes now sweeping Eastern Europe may be about to claim their first institutional casualty: the Council for Mutual Economic Assistance, the Eastern countries' common market. The 10-member council, known as Comecon, has been in trouble for several years as East European countries chafed under trading terms with the Soviet Union that too often left them the losers. Hungary and Poland long have been pressing for reforms.
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