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Eastern Foothill Transportation Corridor

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH
A federal historic preservation agency is questioning whether Orange County toll-road builders conducted enough research before demolishing a cave that some believe was an ancient Native American observatory. The cave near Orange was demolished early last month by the Transportation Corridor Agencies, despite activists' claims that it was a significant site once used to mark the winter solstice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1995 | DEBORAH SCHOCH
A federal historic preservation agency is questioning whether Orange County toll-road builders conducted enough research before demolishing a cave that some believe was an ancient Native American observatory. The cave near Orange was demolished early last month by the Transportation Corridor Agencies, despite activists' claims that it was a significant site once used to mark the winter solstice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1988
A Tustin homeowner group filed a lawsuit Tuesday seeking to force the builders of the proposed Eastern Transportation Corridor to conduct another environmental impact study before beginning construction of the highway project. The Eastern/Foothill Transportation Corridor Agency, a consortium of 10 cities formed to build the thoroughfare, has proposed the project linking the Riverside and Santa Ana freeways as a means of relieving traffic in the north county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1988
The Eastern/Foothill Transportation Corridor Agency voted unanimously Thursday to delay a decision on eastern corridor route proposals until its staff has reviewed recommendations by the cities of Tustin, Orange and Irvine. Under the cities' recommendations, the corridor would extend south from the Riverside Freeway and split into two legs, each of which would connect with the Santa Ana Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1988 | KIRK JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Following the example of the Tustin City Council, the Orange and Irvine city councils Tuesday unanimously approved a plan drafted by mayors of those cities for the proposed Eastern Transportation Corridor. The approvals, along with Tustin's OK on Monday, clear the way for the Eastern/Foothill Transportation Corridor Agency, a consortium of 10 cities formed to build the thoroughfare, to consider the proposal at its meeting Thursday. The proposal was drafted by Orange Mayor Jess F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1988 | KIRK JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Officials from three Orange County cities failed to reach an agreement Thursday with a coalition of homeowner associations on details of proposed links between the planned Eastern Transportation Corridor and the Santa Ana Freeway. Mayors Jess F. Perez of Orange, Larry Agran of Irvine and Richard B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1998
The operators of Orange County toll roads deserve credit for accomplishing what the county seems unable to do: displaying buried treasures from the past. The Transportation Corridor Agencies has put on display in the Old Courthouse Museum in Santa Ana some of the thousands of prehistoric animal bones uncovered during construction of a toll road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988 | KIRK JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
After settling minor disputes with neighboring Orange and Irvine, the Tustin City Council on Monday unanimously approved a route for the proposed Eastern Transportation Corridor. The Tustin council's action came after last week's approval of the route by the city councils of Irvine and Orange. The plan was devised by Orange Mayor Jess F. Perez, Irvine Mayor Larry Agran and former Tustin Mayor Richard B. Edgar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1998 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A scientifically significant collection of 10,000 prehistoric animal bones uncovered during construction of an Orange County toll road is about to find a home. Under a plan the Transportation Corridor Agencies unveiled Thursday, 40 of the bones will be exhibited at the Old Courthouse Museum in Santa Ana for the first time next month, and the rest will be turned over to the county for storage and study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Moving to quiet controversy over seven-figure legal bills, officials of Orange County's tollway agencies Thursday ordered a study of the potential benefits of hiring a staff attorney. The decision came after a partner in the politically influential law firm that has charged the agency $1.2 million in the last 2 1/2 years defended the quality and cost of its work.
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