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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | MEG JAMES
An unidentified man died in a fiery crash after losing control of his Jeep on the Eastern toll road about 3:50 a.m. Sunday, according to the California Highway Patrol. The man was southbound on State Route 241, south of the Windy Ridge toll station, when he veered left into the dirt center divider, a CHP dispatcher said. To correct the maneuver, the driver tried to steer back onto the paved lanes but he lost control of the Jeep, which flipped and caught fire, the dispatcher said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
Without a proposed $2.2-billion bond sale to refinance its debt, a major Orange County tollway could eventually default on its bond payments, according to a report released Wednesday. The analysis by the state treasurer's office supports plans by the Transportation Corridor Agencies to restructure the debt at lower interest on the Foothill-Eastern toll road, which is failing to live up to ridership and revenue projections. "We are pleased with the outcome of the study," said Lisa Telles, communications director for the corridor agency.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1989
An agreement to gradually transfer ownership of a 5,360-acre preserve of oak groves and canyon lands to the county will be discussed Tuesday by the Board of Supervisors. The area, known as Limestone Canyon, is currently owned by the Irvine Co. and is east of Irvine and north of the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station. The deal hinges on the completion of the eastern toll road and two Irvine Co. developments--Northwood Village in Irvine and East Orange in Orange. As certain phases of those projects are reached, the Irvine Co. will dedicate sections of the park to the county.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2003 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
Orange County's largest toll-road network plans to raise rates as much as 50 cents during morning and evening rush-hours in an attempt to improve the operation's financial outlook. Officials of the Transportation Corridor Agencies predicted that the proposed increases would boost revenue for the San Joaquin Hills toll road through southwestern Orange County, which has seen lower-than-expected earnings and downgrades of its bonds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1994
The powers that be can reconstruct Laguna Canyon Road into an expensive transition road from the eastern toll road to the San Joaquin Hills toll road, but they cannot reconstruct someone's brain. If a grown man wishes to race down the wrong side of Laguna Canyon Road at 80 m.p.h. in rush-hour traffic with his two children in the car, one without a seat belt, an expensive new road is NOT going to give him one single brain cell. JANIE COWLIN Laguna Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999
Your readers count on you to provide factual, unbiased accounts of the news, and I am no longer convinced you are doing this when it comes to the toll roads. It seems that long ago when they were in planning and construction phases, you reported on facts. Now that they are open and successfully being used by residents, businesspeople and visitors to Southern California to improve their lives, you slant every story against them and print only toll road opposition letters. Isn't it true that some 1.4 million people take the toll roads every week?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999
Re "Hayden Bill Threatens Quality of Life," May 2 Orange County Voices column by former San Clemente Mayor Steve Apodaca: Who is Apodaca to label anyone an "anti-quality-of-life extremist?" The Foothill South toll road would destroy the real quality of life in southern Orange County. Apodaca states that state Sen. Tom Hayden's bill, SB 1277, would eliminate the locally preferred route for the Foothill South. Preferred by whom? If it is really preferred by most San Clemente residents, why did the City Council feel the need to secretly vote to put on the agenda the item of opposition to SB 1277 in its April 7 meeting?
NEWS
May 5, 2002
Re "Toll Board Sees a Merger as Cure for Its Ills," April 26: Can any of our elected officials explain what is going on with Orange County's toll roads? The 91 Express Lanes are purchased in order to retire the noncompetition agreements that blocked improvements to the public freeway. Orange County Supervisor Todd Spitzer approves the purchase because the toll road "relied on congestion and a lack of mobility to get people to pay. It's bad public policy." But apparently it's OK for Orange County's other toll roads, which continue to have similar noncompete agreements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998
As the toll road authority prepares to open its latest stretch, the Eastern Toll Road, I once again will state that all of this will be a total, dismal failure, one that will fall flat on its face. We taxpayers will have to surgically repair this farce by buying out, at the best price we can get, those individuals who sponsored the bond issue. The federal government gives away our land to those who rape our beautiful forests, lakes and rivers. I still am puzzled as to who authorized the giveaway of our very beautiful countryside to these people so they could ruin our land with their toll roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
The city, which has long opposed construction of the San Joaquin Hills toll road, is now taking on the Eastern toll road, which would stretch 23 miles from the Riverside Freeway to Santiago Canyon Road and then split into two branches that would continue to the Santa Ana Freeway and the Laguna Freeway.
NEWS
May 5, 2002
Re "Toll Board Sees a Merger as Cure for Its Ills," April 26: Can any of our elected officials explain what is going on with Orange County's toll roads? The 91 Express Lanes are purchased in order to retire the noncompetition agreements that blocked improvements to the public freeway. Orange County Supervisor Todd Spitzer approves the purchase because the toll road "relied on congestion and a lack of mobility to get people to pay. It's bad public policy." But apparently it's OK for Orange County's other toll roads, which continue to have similar noncompete agreements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Toll-road officials say they have settled on a more subdued and rustic design for several mobile-telephone antennas to be built along the Eastern tollway. The development could end a two-year battle over the look of the structures. After rejecting a futuristic spire design that at least one toll official characterized as a "monstrosity," the Transportation Corridor Agencies board will meet Thursday to consider approval of an antenna design that resembles an oil derrick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2000 | MEG JAMES
An unidentified man died in a fiery crash after losing control of his Jeep on the Eastern toll road about 3:50 a.m. Sunday, according to the California Highway Patrol. The man was southbound on State Route 241, south of the Windy Ridge toll station, when he veered left into the dirt center divider, a CHP dispatcher said. To correct the maneuver, the driver tried to steer back onto the paved lanes but he lost control of the Jeep, which flipped and caught fire, the dispatcher said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1999
Your readers count on you to provide factual, unbiased accounts of the news, and I am no longer convinced you are doing this when it comes to the toll roads. It seems that long ago when they were in planning and construction phases, you reported on facts. Now that they are open and successfully being used by residents, businesspeople and visitors to Southern California to improve their lives, you slant every story against them and print only toll road opposition letters. Isn't it true that some 1.4 million people take the toll roads every week?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1999
Re "Hayden Bill Threatens Quality of Life," May 2 Orange County Voices column by former San Clemente Mayor Steve Apodaca: Who is Apodaca to label anyone an "anti-quality-of-life extremist?" The Foothill South toll road would destroy the real quality of life in southern Orange County. Apodaca states that state Sen. Tom Hayden's bill, SB 1277, would eliminate the locally preferred route for the Foothill South. Preferred by whom? If it is really preferred by most San Clemente residents, why did the City Council feel the need to secretly vote to put on the agenda the item of opposition to SB 1277 in its April 7 meeting?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Traffic on the new Eastern Toll Road dropped by 42% after its operators began charging one-way tolls of up to $3.25 this week, officials said Tuesday. Preliminary numbers released by the Transportation Corridor Agencies, which oversees privately financed highways in Orange County, show about 84,000 drivers used the 17-mile shortcut between Irvine and Riverside County on Monday. That number is down from an average of 145,000 last week, when the ride was free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A trip down the Eastern Toll Road isn't just a timesaver--it also feels like time travel, a journey back to the days when Orange County had endless stretches of open space. At Thursday's ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new 17 miles of road, hundreds of dignitaries and guests took a first spin on the road that opens to the public Sunday. And the black-and-white, Ansel Adams-like photo of the highway emblazoned on the event program does not mislead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the controversial Riverside Freeway toll lanes are seeking to refinance the private thoroughfare in an attempt to lower their debt and eventually eliminate tolls for carpools, motorcyclists and the disabled. Greg Hulsizer, general manager of the 91 Express Lanes, said if the California Private Transportation Co. can refinance, the move will help push the 6-year-old operation closer to profitability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1998
As the toll road authority prepares to open its latest stretch, the Eastern Toll Road, I once again will state that all of this will be a total, dismal failure, one that will fall flat on its face. We taxpayers will have to surgically repair this farce by buying out, at the best price we can get, those individuals who sponsored the bond issue. The federal government gives away our land to those who rape our beautiful forests, lakes and rivers. I still am puzzled as to who authorized the giveaway of our very beautiful countryside to these people so they could ruin our land with their toll roads.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A trip down the Eastern Toll Road isn't just a timesaver--it also feels like time travel, a journey back to the days when Orange County had endless stretches of open space. At Thursday's ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new 17 miles of road, hundreds of dignitaries and guests took a first spin on the road that opens to the public Sunday. And the black-and-white, Ansel Adams-like photo of the highway emblazoned on the event program does not mislead.
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