Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEasy
IN THE NEWS

Easy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
February 4, 2009
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Given the danger posed by drunk or reckless drivers, police should follow up on information - even information from an anonymous source - that a vehicle might be careening down a street or threatening other motorists and pedestrians. If they confirm that is the case, they should stop the vehicle. But that isn't what happened in a California case decided by the Supreme Court last week. The court's ruling makes it too easy for police to stop motorists on the basis of an anonymous tip. In 2008, a 911 dispatch team in Mendocino County received a report that a pickup truck had forced another vehicle off the road, giving rise to a concern that the driver might be drunk.
Advertisement
REAL ESTATE
April 19, 1987
I read with great interest Don Campbell's two-part story (March 1 and 8) on gifts of residences to educational institutions. The story was insightful, thoughtful and well-written. You were able to present a very technical and complicated concept in a way that was easy to read and easy to understand. PETER WAKEMAN Malibu Wakeman is university affairs legal counsel and director of planned giving at Pepperdine University.
OPINION
April 22, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Nearly a decade ago, when Los Angeles gave a $270-million tax break to the developer of a 1,000-room luxury hotel at L.A. Live, city leaders described the deal as essential to spur downtown redevelopment and help the struggling Convention Center. Today, however, downtown is booming and its hotels are doing brisk business, yet developers continue to line up for taxpayer handouts. Four more hotel projects have been approved for tax breaks worth half a billion dollars over the next two decades - money that otherwise would pay for police and fire services, street paving and tree trimming.
TRAVEL
January 10, 1999
It was with great pride that I read your article "A Creole Christmas" (Nov. 29) about my native New Orleans. I can confirm that the prices you quoted for the holiday season are about as good as they get for visiting the Big Easy. ARMAND ST. MARTIN Los Angeles
SPORTS
October 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Jonathan Quick was appreciative of the Kings' special-team units. Because of their success, his workload was fairly light despite 30 shots. Ryan Smyth scored the Kings' sixth power-play goal of the season and the penalty killer stopped St. Louis on five opportunities in a 2-1 victory Saturday night. Former Blues player Michal Handzus also scored for the Kings, who won their third in a row after opening the season with a home loss to the Phoenix Coyotes. The Kings, who gave up four power-play goals in a game earlier in the week, made it easy for their goalie, who stopped 29 shots on the night -- 14 in the third period.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
Re "The Sponge Won" (Aug. 3): The true "winner," sadly, is generica, i.e., lemminghood, sameness, etc. Any pursuit that requires time, dedication and effort is too difficult for these masses. The Sponge world worships at the altar of Easy. Denise Hildebrand Tustin
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Margaret Wappler
Mimi Pond is the cartoonist that time almost forgot. Her credits should've sealed her in the pantheon of coolness forever: She wrote "The Simpsons'" first episode, "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire," as well as episodes of the children's TV show-cum-surrealist theater project "Pee-wee's Playhouse. " In 1982, her cult-classic book, "The Valley Girls' Guide to Life," taught wannabe Vals how to dress in a, like, totally tubular style. She wrote and illustrated four other humorous books on fashion, including 1985's "Shoes Never Lie," which tapped the stiletto obsession long before "Sex and the City," as well as comics for many publications, including this newspaper.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2010 | By James C. Taylor
Anna Deavere Smith made her name in the 1990s with plays that looked at America when, in her words, "things were already upside down." Her latest work, "Let Me Down Easy," came after years of purposely avoiding hot-button, sociopolitical topics that had become her metier with "Fires in the Mirror" and "Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992," two seminal works from the '90s that looked at urban unrest. Sitting in a Manhattan bakery last week, the actress and author ruminated over the decade it took to write "Let Me Down Easy."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Easy" resists easy classifications. It is a lively, idiosyncratic romantic comedy, funny and sexy but with a strong serious streak. It's both a promising debut for writer-director Jane Weinstock and a breakthrough role for star Marguerite Moreau. Set in a contemporary L.A. that is recognizable both psychologically and physically (credit cinematographer Paul Ryan and production designer Aradhana Seth), "Easy" talks the local talk as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Howard Askins grew up in New York, the son of blue-collar transit authority employees who expected him to go far, and he did. His first stop was Brown University, and then he was off to Harvard, where he earned both medical and law degrees before moving on to psychiatric residency at UCLA. Nathaniel Ayers, like Askins, grew up working class - in his case, Cleveland was home. His dream was music, not medicine, and his hard work landed him at the prestigious Juilliard School for the Performing Arts in New York City, where he played for a time in the same orchestra as Yo-Yo Ma. On Monday, the two African American men sat across from each other in a former pickle factory on San Fernando Road that serves as the mental health division of Los Angeles County Superior Court.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2014 | Kate Linthicum
TEL AVIV - Tamer Nafar, a 34-year-old rapper who has been described as the Chuck D of Palestinian hip-hop, was standing on a sidewalk dressed in a skin-tight black bodysuit and wearing a silky red wig. "Can I see more duck lips?" the director prodded from behind the camera. Nafar pursed obediently. FOR THE RECORD: Tamer Nafar: A profile of Palestinian rapper Tamer Nafar in the April 13 Arts and Books section said that SodaStream, a company that manufactures beverage carbonation machines, was headquartered in an Israeli settlement in the West Bank.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - A key panel of senators investigating the security of the nation's power grid Thursday had mostly softball questions for utility executives and regulators about exposure to assaults like the one by gunmen last year that nearly knocked out electricity in Silicon Valley. Instead, the Senate Energy and Public Works Committee focused its fury on the news media. The media, declared Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), has “served to sensationalize the issue of physical grid security instead of helping protect the grid from attack.” Recent coverage of the April 2013 attack near San Jose, in which a pair of gunmen shot up several transformers at a substation and then escaped into the night, has unnerved utility officials and regulators.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON - An account of the Federal Reserve's last meeting suggests that policymakers aren't as eager to take away the punch bowl as the market thought. The minutes of the March 18-19 meeting state that Fed officials worried that their individual projections for when the central bank would start raising interest rates "could be misconstrued" as indicating a shift by the Fed committee to tighter monetary policy. The average projections released after the March meeting showed a slight move forward in the anticipated timing of a Fed rate increase, and Fed Chairwoman Janet L. Yellen herself gave the impression in a news conference that day that a rate hike could be made by mid-2015, earlier than what the market had been expecting.
TRAVEL
April 6, 2014 | By Jen Leo
Here's the latest trip-planning website that can help you craft your own guidebook. Name: http://www.BonVoyaging.com What it does: It's a Web bookmarking tool that lets you collect and store your travel itineraries, complete with maps and the ability to download and share. Cost: Free What's hot: This website has two things that will keep me coming back: its beautiful, design-friendly layout, and the ability to print out a PDF of my itinerary. I love being able to access my travel plans from my smartphone or tablet, as well as sharing with my friends on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest, but I'm still a paper girl at heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Margaret Wappler
Mimi Pond is the cartoonist that time almost forgot. Her credits should've sealed her in the pantheon of coolness forever: She wrote "The Simpsons'" first episode, "Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire," as well as episodes of the children's TV show-cum-surrealist theater project "Pee-wee's Playhouse. " In 1982, her cult-classic book, "The Valley Girls' Guide to Life," taught wannabe Vals how to dress in a, like, totally tubular style. She wrote and illustrated four other humorous books on fashion, including 1985's "Shoes Never Lie," which tapped the stiletto obsession long before "Sex and the City," as well as comics for many publications, including this newspaper.
SPORTS
February 19, 1987 | Associated Press
West German Steffi Graf, ranked No. 3 in the world, defeated Angeliki Kanellopoulou of Greece, 6-2, 6-0, in 35 minutes Wednesday night to advance to the third round of the $250,000 Virginia Slims of Florida women's tennis tournament. Seeded second to Chris Evert Lloyd, who won her second-round match Tuesday, Graf suffered just one lapse in her match. She double-faulted twice and lost service in the third game but quickly recovered to take the next 11 games, losing only 11 points.
SPORTS
June 1, 1985
Larry Holmes is not a champion. He is an old man attempting to break a great record by taking the easy way out. If he wants to be recognized as a great champion, he should try fighting a great fighter, or show some class and preserve the true champion's record. DEREK W. STARK Woodland Hills
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Susan King
Robert Altman's films were audacious. He expanded the boundaries of genres. He gave his actors freedom to improvise and over the years created a stock company of stars. Along the way, he often polarized critics and audiences - and drove studio heads crazy. Not every film he did was a masterpiece, and he had lulls in his career. But Altman was nothing if not resilient, and just when Hollywood had written him off, he would make a dazzling comeback. His experimental style, known for overlapping dialogue and loosely structured stories, has influenced contemporary directors such as Paul Thomas Anderson, who was the standby director on the then-ailing Altman's final film, 2006's "A Prairie Home Companion.
SPORTS
March 24, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
For much of our adult lives, the Lakers have been the toast of the town. That's why the anguish is so understandable now that they are merely toast. But in the midst of all the noise, have we not missed some of the more salient points? Are we so engrossed in our need for instant gratification that we cannot look beyond the most recent tweet? Even as we dissect everything about the Lakers as if they were biology-class frogs, aren't we getting off track a bit? There is no intention here of being an apologist.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|