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Eating Habits

OPINION
July 22, 2001 | GREG CRITSER, Greg Critser's book on the modern obesity epidemic, "Supersize," will be published in 2002 by Houghton-Mifflin
Sometime over the next month or so, United Nations health and nutrition experts will convene in New York to begin discussing what many consider to be the pivotal medical issue of our day: obesity and its impact on children. For the U.N., traditionally concerned with starvation and malnutrition, it is a historic first, following up on an alarm it sounded about obese adults in 1999. 'Obesity,' the U.N.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001
In four Santa Ana schools there is a new R and emphasis in the learning process. It's the four Rs: Reading, Riting, Rithmetic--and Reducing. The approach is part of a national campaign to reduce obesity in children. It's also a valid part of the basic role of schools striving to give students knowledge that will help make their lives more productive and fulfilling. The interesting part of this anti-obesity effort is that it involves not only students but also parents.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2001 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tough times in the California fruit business have caused the world's largest fruit and vegetable producer to sell off a large piece of its farming operations in the state and focus instead on marketing imported fruit. Westlake Village-based Dole Foods Co. will stop growing table grapes, peaches, plums and nectarines on four Central Valley ranches that employ 1,200 seasonal workers. Dole hopes to sell the 5,000 acres by the end of the year and will use the proceeds to pay down debt.
NEWS
September 26, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Fattened by fast food and immobilized by TV and video games, a surprising segment of California teenagers is heading into adulthood at greater risk of chronic disease and even premature death, according to the first comprehensive statewide study of youths' eating and exercise habits. The 1998 telephone survey of more than 1,200 12- to 17-year-olds found that nearly a third of the youths were overweight or on the verge of being so.
HEALTH
March 20, 2000 | SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
With every meal, many Americans consume a hefty portion of guilt along with whatever else happens to be on their plates. We struggle to choose foods that not only satisfy hunger, but that don't cost too much and can be prepared and eaten quickly (since eating on the run is now a national pastime).
HEALTH
January 31, 2000 | JANE ALLEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Much of the latest research on childhood obesity is focused on prevention and intervention: breaking children of their bond to television, guiding them toward more physical activity and improving their eating habits. Effects of television: In landmark studies in the 1980s and '90s, Dr. William H.
HEALTH
January 31, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN
For a child, family eating patterns and parental pressures can make the difference between a healthy body and a sensible outlook on meals or a lifetime of bad eating habits. Experts recommend that parents establish good habits and pass them on to their kids. * Don't restrict eating by making certain foods off-limits; it's a sure way to make those foods more attractive.
HEALTH
January 3, 2000 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We know what they preach, but what are they practicing? Curious, we asked 10 of Southern California's high-profile doctors what they do to stay healthy. We also got them to confess to their less-than-healthy habits and to fill us in on their healthy resolutions for the new millennium. Some, you'll see, are your classic overachievers, at work as well as at play, but even so, most believe the key to mental and physical health is balance.
NEWS
April 19, 1999
We recently asked how you encourage healthy eating habits with your kids. Keeping in mind that some kids cannot tolerate certain foods, here are some approaches that have worked in these families: It finally dawned on me that if I wanted my kids to eat healthier, we all had to eat healthier. So out went all the junk foods and in came the nutritious ones. I keep plenty of fruits, carrots and yogurt around for snacks, and prepare healthy balanced meals.
HEALTH
March 29, 1999 | EDITH WOOD HARVATH
I used to be fat for the simple reason that I ate too much. As a teenager, in my 20s and well into my 30s, I ate for emotional satisfaction, out of stress and for compensation when things went wrong. Then one day--as I realized that the big 4-0 was fast approaching--I thought, enough of this type of behavior. I'm an important person, I'm a valuable person and, yes, life is tough, but I want to participate fully in it. I want to make the most of who I am.
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