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Eavesdropping

NEWS
June 27, 1992 | Associated Press
A former assistant dean at Stanford University has been sentenced to four years probation for secretly videotaping women as they undressed in his campus apartment. A Municipal Court judge sentenced Keith Archuleta on Thursday, after Archuleta's lawyer entered a no contest plea on his behalf to misdemeanor charges of electronic eavesdropping. He also was ordered to perform 200 hours of community service.
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OPINION
January 4, 2006
Re "Bush Says Terrorism Warrants Spying in U.S.," Jan. 2 President Bush justifies secret electronic eavesdropping by the National Security Agency with the statement: "We are at war with an enemy who wants to hurt us again." Because there is no way to know if and when such a war is over or even when this enemy is disabled, then this eavesdropping must be permanent and ongoing, yes? Goodbye, land of the free! Oh, brave new world, a la Orwell. NANCY PALTER Los Angeles Re "Leak in Domestic Spy Program Investigated," Dec. 31 I find it appalling that the Justice Department has launched an investigation into who leaked classified information regarding President Bush's secret domestic spying program, instead of investigating why the program exists in the first place.
NATIONAL
January 24, 2006 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
President Bush said Monday that spying on people in the United States by the National Security Agency and soon-to-expire elements of the Patriot Act were legal means to fight terrorism as he made a public embrace of the programs aimed at turning them to political advantage.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2005 | Edwin Chen and Janet Hook, Times Staff Writers
President Bush launched a bristling counteroffensive Monday against critics of his domestic anti-terrorism policies, saying it was "inexcusable" for the Senate to delay renewal of the Patriot Act and insisting that his decision to order electronic eavesdropping without court approval was legal and proper.
OPINION
January 22, 2007
Re "U.S. ceases warrantless spy operation," Jan. 18 Isn't this what the law required all along? Why should we believe the Bush administration this time? MARK HUBERMAN Los Angeles The media and many in Congress are portraying the change in the administration's domestic spying operations as a significant concession to criticism that it was illegal because it was carried out without court approval. Not so fast. The attorney general's letter announcing the change does say that the internal eavesdropping "will now be conducted subject to the approval of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance court."
NEWS
June 9, 1991 | DONALD P. BAKER and KENT JENKINS JR., THE WASHINGTON POST
Sen. Charles S. Robb (D-Va.) confirmed Saturday that his office once had in its possession a secretly recorded telephone conversation of Gov. L. Douglas Wilder, but that it shredded the tape in recent weeks. The tape, a transcript of which was made available to the Washington Post by a source Saturday, was "received anonymously . . . in a brown envelope" in late 1988, Robb said through his press secretary, Steve Johnson.
NEWS
October 28, 1988 | From The Washington Post
The United States has presented the Soviet Union with claims for $29 million in damages for shoddy workmanship and construction delays in building the new U.S. Embassy office building in Moscow, which is to be completely razed and rebuilt under recommendations made public by President Reagan on Thursday. State Department officials, who disclosed the U.S. claims Thursday, said further bills for damage from alleged "Soviet penetration" of the structure are being considered.
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The discovery of electronic devices that could have enabled security officers to hear conversations in private judicial chambers set off a flurry of concern and controversy Friday at the state Supreme Court and the Court of Appeal. The devices were installed as part of an elaborate security system in the new offices of the high court and the appellate court that serves the San Francisco region.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. intelligence agencies got hard evidence that Libya has a poison gas plant by eavesdropping on frantic Libyan telephone calls for help to West German companies after a spill during a poison gas production test last August, NBC News reported Thursday. It said summaries of the intercepted conversations were recently turned over to West German officials to quash their government's denials that West German firms had helped build what the United States says is a Libyan chemical weapons plant.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An attorney for a co-defendant of deposed strongman Manuel A. Noriega said Tuesday he is asking for top-secret records of the National Security Agency on grounds that the agency "regularly monitored" all communications of Noriega's Panama Defense Forces. In the first federal court papers seeking U.S. intelligence files in the Noriega case, defense lawyer Michael J.
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