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Ebbe Roe Smith

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NEWS
December 25, 1994 | Kenneth Turan
Caught in the Mother of All Traffic Jams on the hottest day of the year in Los Angeles, Michael Douglas (pictured), with a scowl surgically planted on his face, heads west toward the ocean. On a Cook's tour of urban decay, he's passive no more. He is Everyman-turned-Terminator, wreaking vengeance for the slights of a lifetime on anyone who gets in his way.
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NEWS
December 25, 1994 | Kenneth Turan
Caught in the Mother of All Traffic Jams on the hottest day of the year in Los Angeles, Michael Douglas (pictured), with a scowl surgically planted on his face, heads west toward the ocean. On a Cook's tour of urban decay, he's passive no more. He is Everyman-turned-Terminator, wreaking vengeance for the slights of a lifetime on anyone who gets in his way.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | RYAN MURPHY
Although "Falling Down" could be set in any major U.S. city, screenwriter Ebbe Roe Smith says he wanted to write about Los Angeles as experienced by a man at the end of his rope because "to me, L.A. is the future of everywhere else in the United States. "Things that are happening here today will be happening everywhere else tomorrow," says Roe. "In the film, the lead character (D-FENS, played by Michael Douglas) has to deal with a lot of L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It all starts with a fly. A fly buzzing around in a car with failing air-conditioning and non-functioning windows, stuck on the L.A. freeways in the Mother of All Traffic Jams on the hottest day of the year. If this sounds like a setup, you're beginning to get the picture. There is a man inside the car, an ostentatiously average citizen with a white shirt and tie, brush haircut and clunky glasses, even a pen shield in his shirt pocket and a patriotic "D-Fens" personalized license plate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It all starts with a fly. A fly buzzing around in a car with failing air-conditioning and non-functioning windows, stuck on the L.A. freeways in the Mother of All Traffic Jams on the hottest day of the year. If this sounds like a setup, you're beginning to get the picture. There is a man inside the car, an ostentatiously average citizen with a white shirt and tie, brush haircut and clunky glasses, even a pen shield in his shirt pocket and a patriotic "D-Fens" personalized license plate.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | EBBE ROE SMITH, Ebbe Roe Smith wrote the screenplay for "Falling Down."
The screenplay for "Falling Down" was a reaction to a lot of things. It is difficult to be specific about interior motivations, especially if they are buried back at the beginning of a long process of bringing clarity to a mental soup concocted of the past and present, the personal and public. What follows are a few of the images and thoughts that assailed me at the beginning and that I still find relevant, now that the journey is over.
NEWS
October 2, 1994 | SUSAN KING
Here's the lineup for Showtime's "Directed By" series, week by week: "Texan" Sunday at 10 p.m. Directed by Treat Williams. Starring Dabney Coleman, Dana Delany, Charles Durning and Brian Doyle Murray, with a cameo by Williams. David Mamet penned this mystery about an ex-fighter pilot who suspects his beautiful young wife of shady dealings after he learns she's withdrawn a huge sum of money from her bank account. "On Hope" Sunday at 10:30 p.m. Directed by JoBeth Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1989 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
South Coast Repertory had a big weekend. The industrious playgoer could see new plays by Marlane Meyer, Beth Henley and Robert Daseler, and attend readings of new scripts by Sam Garcia Jr. and Philip Kan Gotanda, all part of SCR's California Play Festival--Calfest. With time for only one show, I chose Meyer's "The Geography of Luck." This started as a reading at the Los Angeles Theatre Center and will return there for a mainstage production in August. It's a work in transition, although you wouldn't know it from Roberta Levitow's assured SCR production, featuring Ebbe Roe Smith as an ex-con trying to connect with his life and Elizabeth Ruscio as a woman who is ready to help him, up to a point.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
It is, perhaps, the La Jolla Playhouse's most ambitious production of the season. The sets by Doug Stein star as a series of colorful, cartoon-like, corrugated cutout drops. They go up and down, supplemented by wagons that roll on and off. The pit is a command post of assorted technician/musicians who run tapes when they're not noodling synthesizers or instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | EBBE ROE SMITH, Ebbe Roe Smith wrote the screenplay for "Falling Down."
The screenplay for "Falling Down" was a reaction to a lot of things. It is difficult to be specific about interior motivations, especially if they are buried back at the beginning of a long process of bringing clarity to a mental soup concocted of the past and present, the personal and public. What follows are a few of the images and thoughts that assailed me at the beginning and that I still find relevant, now that the journey is over.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1993 | RYAN MURPHY
Although "Falling Down" could be set in any major U.S. city, screenwriter Ebbe Roe Smith says he wanted to write about Los Angeles as experienced by a man at the end of his rope because "to me, L.A. is the future of everywhere else in the United States. "Things that are happening here today will be happening everywhere else tomorrow," says Roe. "In the film, the lead character (D-FENS, played by Michael Douglas) has to deal with a lot of L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | DON SHIRLEY
Of the shows I reviewed this year, the most glittering production was Martin Benson's staging of "Misalliance" at South Coast Repertory. It achieved maximum opulence without sacrificing the sharp edge of Shaw's ideas and his wit. The most glittering new script was Suzanne Lummis' "October 22, 4004 B.C., Saturday" at the Cast. Caught between cosmic thoughts and human feelings, her characters could have just sat there and talked, and the evening would have been entertaining.
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