Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEccentricity
IN THE NEWS

Eccentricity

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 24, 1993 | PAMELA WARRICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mitchell can't stop washing his hands. Philip has trouble keeping his clothes on--even in cold weather. And Luke goes everywhere with a pair of men's bikini underpants around his neck. Bizarre behavior? Maybe by adult standards, but not for little kids. For 4-year-old Philip, 2-year-old Luke and 3-year-old Mitchell, it's just a part of growing up. Parents may be worried when children's habits mimic frightening adult disorders, but the experts say: Relax.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Rhys Darby, who played personal manager (and New Zealand deputy cultural attache) Murray Hewitt on HBO's "Flight of the Conchords," has created a series in which to star. "Short Poppies" gets a U.S. premiere Thursday via Netflix, all eight episodes at once, only a couple of days after it bows in its native New Zealand. The title plays off "tall poppies," a common Commonwealth phrase, borrowed from the Greeks to describe persons of accomplishment or quality whose distinction can also make them targets.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 27, 2000 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gordon Elwood of Medford, Ore., kept his pants up with a bungee cord, accepted handouts from a food bank and refused to have a phone installed in his home because of the cost. When he died in October at age 79, he left a $10-million fortune. Elwood was among a small fraternity of America's upper class: the penny-pinching, often shabbily dressed wealthy who are almost as much a mystery to the people who know them as to the millions of strangers who read their stories and wonder, "Why?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
By 1991, Mike Kelley had emerged as a crucial artist in Los Angeles, at the head of a pack that had pushed into prominence in the previous decade. His riveting sculptures reassembled from ratty stuffed animals, crocheted dolls and other tattered children's playthings that he scavenged from thrift shops were also generating considerable critical attention far beyond the city. Then 36, Kelley was invited to participate in the Carnegie International exhibition in Pittsburgh, one of the oldest and most respected surveys of its kind.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Time Staff Writers
L. Ron Hubbard enjoyed being pampered. He surrounded himself with teen-age followers, whom he indoctrinated, treated like servants and cherished as though they were his own children. He called them the "Commodore's messengers." " 'Messenger!' " he would boom in the morning. "And we'd pull him out of bed," one recalled. The youngsters, whose parents belonged to Hubbard's Church of Scientology, would lay out his clothes, run his shower and help him dress.
SPORTS
November 15, 1988 | ROSS NEWHAN, Times Staff Writer
If it had still been raining Monday, lightning might have struck the roof of an Anaheim hotel when Doug Rader told a table of sportswriters that he is not now, and has never been, a flake, baseball jargon for weird, eccentric or, as a Times headline once described the man who claims he has never been a flake: "King of the Cuckoos." The Angels had just announced that Rader would be their 13th manager in 29 years.
SPORTS
January 31, 1996 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a conference call last November, USA Wrestling's athletes advisory council debated whether to ask the sport's national governing body to end its association with John E. du Pont. Amateur wrestling's most generous benefactor for almost a decade, Du Pont had been accused of racism after dismissing two African American wrestlers from the state-of-the-art training center on his 800-acre Foxcatcher Farms estate in the rolling hills near Philadelphia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2000 | GINA PICCALO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Manhattan Beach doctor arrested this week on charges that he filed $4.5 million in false medical claims had an eccentric lifestyle, often rummaging through garbage bins for salvage although he lived in an oceanfront home and owned several planes and cars, according to his neighbors. Dr. Stanley Furmanski, 54, a diagnostic neuroradiologist, remains in federal custody and is scheduled to be arraigned in U.S. District Court next week on 13 counts of mail fraud.
NEWS
September 2, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a dark ledge under the Grand Central Station Terminal, just five feet directly above the IRT train's deadly electrified third rail, a fine stream of sunlight filters down through 20 feet of stagnant air onto a makeshift table. It illuminates a bouquet of flowers and a book by W. H. Auden. The only other intrusion into the 9-by-9-foot compartment recessed in the tunnel wall is the thunderous quake of passing trains.
NEWS
March 10, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
In December, 1942, 27-year-old Frank Sinatra stood on stage at New York's Paramount Theater, embraced his microphone, fixed his blue eyes on the bobby-soxers in the front row and crooned, sending his audience of teen-age girls into a shrieking, hair-tearing swoon. That was the birth of a superstar. And as Gavin de Becker sees it, it was the advent of the age of celebrities as targets. Targets of lovesick men and women. Targets of fans with benign, mildly amusing delusions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richard Winton
On this stretch of Stone Canyon Road in Bel-Air, Robert Bandler was known as "the color of the neighborhood. " He often wore fatigues and a military hat. He once crashed a wedding across the street. He ended some conversations by saying "over and out" and played historic war speeches late at night, loud enough for neighbors to hear. Los Angeles police officers knew him well from numerous calls to the home for odd behavior. Officers who patrolled the area even gave him a nickname: "Crazy Bob. " "He was the talk of the neighborhood, he was the color of the neighborhood," said 73-year-old Stephen Verona, who lives across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richard Winton
On this stretch of Stone Canyon Road in Bel-Air, Robert Bandler was known as “the color of the neighborhood.” He often wore fatigues and a military hat. He once crashed a wedding across the street. Ended some conversations by saying “over and out” and played historic war speeches late at night, loud enough for neighbors to hear. Los Angeles police officers knew him well from numerous call-outs to the home for odd behavior. Officers who patrolled the area even gave him a nickname: “Crazy Bob.” “He was the talk of the neighborhood, he was the color of the neighborhood,” said 73-year-old Stephen Verona, who lives across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
In her role as a counterculture den mother to a group of suburban would-be rock stars in the new musical "The Black Suits," Annie Golden isn't just going through the motions. She knows rock 'n' roll. The 62-year-old actress was the lead singer of the Brooklyn-based punk band the Shirts in the 1970s. She was discovered by director Milos Forman when the band was headlining the legendary East Village rock club CBGB, and he cast her in his 1979 film adaptation of "Hair. " Although she has acted on Broadway, in movies and on TV - including most recently on the hit Netflix series "Orange Is the New Black" - she still relates to her rebellious roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Chances are good that Harry Dean Stanton, the prolific character actor with the face of a backwoods prophet, will be the subject of a straightforward career-retrospective documentary someday. For now we have something that's more in tune with the man: Sophie Huber's lyrical and enigmatic portrait, "Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction. " At the film's heart is a fitful conversation that unfolds like a string of koans, epigrams, jokes and silences. And songs. A reluctant interviewee with no interest in biographical facts, Stanton would rather sing than yak. The unrepentant loner says he's "not psychologically wired for institutions"; nonetheless, within the moviemaking system he's amassed 200-plus film credits and counting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Like it were planned, and perhaps it was, American fans of Chris O'Dowd left bereft by the end of Christopher Guest's HBO series "Family Tree" may jump, as from a lovely frying pan into a really nice fire, to O'Dowd's own "Moone Boy," which begins streaming Wednesday on Hulu. As it happens - and not surprisingly, given that the improvisatory "Family Tree" made much use of O'Dowd's own voice - the two series have a lot in common. Both are sweet and a little eccentric, interested in small things and informed by the creator-star's seeming good nature, though perhaps that is just the soft music of the accent.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency is the size of a small town, with more than 30,000 employees and as much variety. There are blue-haired iconoclasts who work in their socks, buttoned-down military types and pale-faced introverts who avoid eye contact in the hallways. On the surface, at least, Edward Snowden was hardly unusual at America's largest and most powerful intelligence agency. A self-taught computer whiz who wanted to travel the world, Snowden seemed a perfect fit for a secretive organization that spies on communications from foreign terrorism suspects.
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | Joel Sappell and Robert W. Welkos, Time Staff Writers
Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard often said that man's most basic drive is that of survival. And when it came to his own, he used whatever was necessary -- false identities, cover stories, deception. There is no better illustration of this than the way he secretly controlled the Church of Scientology while hiding from a world he viewed as increasingly hostile.
NEWS
March 19, 1989 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
In the small park in front of Horton Plaza, the downtown shopping mall, the usual assortment of drifters, derelicts and screaming street corner proselytizers are gathered on a warm afternoon. Among them is William Troy Landreth, a young homeless man with a genius-level IQ who at age 18 became an underground hero to computer hackers nationwide. A pioneer in the craft, he was known at the height of his fame only by his code name: The Cracker.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Goodwin Games" is family comedy debuting as a late midseason replacement with only a seven-episode order. So even at Fox, a network not known for hit comedies, hopes are not high. On the other hand, there is a lot of talk these days of rethinking the old models of American television, including making the standard network season (22 to 24 episodes) more like the cable model of 10 to 12. At this year's upfronts, where networks roll out their new fall lineups for advertisers in New York City, Fox discussed several "limited" or "event" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Christopher Guest, the director of "Best in Show" and "A Mighty Wind," has made a TV series for HBO. The eight-episode "Family Tree," which premieres Sunday, is his first work in seven years, and like his films it is sweet and funny and not a little melancholy. Guest gives the world a quarter-twist toward the ridiculous, without losing sight of the human dreams and strivings, obsessions and accommodations that are his main and constant subject. The new series, which opens in England before moving in its second half to America, stars Chris O'Dowd, an Irish comic actor who has been insinuating himself little by little into the American consciousness; he was in "Bridesmaids" and "This Is 40" and had a recurring role in the first season of "Girls," and many will know him as the star of the British sitcom "The IT Crowd.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|