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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
To anyone who is too long in the tooth to qualify for the yuppie generation, what has been depressing about the whole phenomenon is that the yuppies seem to march off an assembly line, as shiningly alike as so many BMWs. Their devout similarities in tastes and goals, their seemingly paradoxical mixture of egocentrism and conformity, is enough to raise fears that our society will run short of eccentrics, freethinkers and other apostles of idiosyncrasy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Rhys Darby, who played personal manager (and New Zealand deputy cultural attache) Murray Hewitt on HBO's "Flight of the Conchords," has created a series in which to star. "Short Poppies" gets a U.S. premiere Thursday via Netflix, all eight episodes at once, only a couple of days after it bows in its native New Zealand. The title plays off "tall poppies," a common Commonwealth phrase, borrowed from the Greeks to describe persons of accomplishment or quality whose distinction can also make them targets.
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NEWS
January 3, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Mikhail Puchkov, the only way to experience freedom in Soviet life was to steal it: paddling down a river in the dead of night in a homemade pedal-powered submarine. Traveling in his illegal craft, with its pedals quieted to avoid detection, was an eccentric escape from the crushing reality of Soviet rule with his dignity and creativity intact. Now, sailing out to sea in this chunky, ungainly vessel is his only escape from the disappointment and poverty of the new Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
By 1991, Mike Kelley had emerged as a crucial artist in Los Angeles, at the head of a pack that had pushed into prominence in the previous decade. His riveting sculptures reassembled from ratty stuffed animals, crocheted dolls and other tattered children's playthings that he scavenged from thrift shops were also generating considerable critical attention far beyond the city. Then 36, Kelley was invited to participate in the Carnegie International exhibition in Pittsburgh, one of the oldest and most respected surveys of its kind.
SPORTS
May 13, 1989
I certainly agree with Jim Murray's position (April 30) that blacks excel in athletics not because of fixed genes but because they are currently from that part of our society that still has to fight to survive. But it's unfortunate that Murray had to mar his otherwise perceptive column with a display of bias--though not against blacks. Murray's own inner distortions emerge in his implication that the only "eccentrics" in America capable of "despising the rest of mankind" are Anglo-Saxon.
NEWS
June 15, 2009
TV movies never quite get the level of buzz and respect that the series get, but that doesn't mean this year hasn't seen its share of quality made-for-TV movies. Though Lifetime has a reputation for lurid women-in-peril flicks, its "Prayers for Bobby" (above, with Ryan Kelley and Sigourney Weaver) attracted many good notices. Meanwhile, HBO captured some buzz with its Hamptons eccentrics fiesta, "Grey Gardens." Which one do our panelists favor? Find out at TheEnvelope.com/buzzmeter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1987 | KATE CALLEN, United Press International
The people of Los Angeles own more poodles, eat more fish, spend more of their money on cars, consult more psychiatrists and mediums and rob more banks than the people of any other city in the nation. But wait, there's more. Los Angeles is the home of the world's first kaleidoscope store, stand-up roller coaster, water bar (51 varieties and don't dare ask for ice) and dogramat (that's a public dog wash).
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
If life is a stage then Laurie Pincus is a playwright turned set designer. The New York artist's thin wooden cutout plywood figures are painted with the bright colors of a third-grade primer. They display a fascination for the theatrics of early film as well as folk art's straightforward approach to articulating the figure. Yet despite all the melodramatic posturing the tableaux she creates are emotionally empty. The characters, in their shallow plays with real space, feel as remote as single frames taken from an unfamiliar old movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 1986
I found what Al Pacino had to say very interesting and found what Paul Rosenfield had to say rather boring ("Actor, Actor," Dec. 29). Al Pacino is an actor. That's the man's job. Of course, he's going to be a bit different, eccentric. So Pacino is reclusive and values his private life and won't speak about his relationships. I think Rosenfield in this case is getting too used to the frivolous of the acting profession who would rather talk about a lunch partner or silly studio hype than . . . "the heart of matters," which is never easy to discuss.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | KRISTINE MCKENNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"People come to our film expecting some kind of true crime story but that's not what we were attempting to do," said 30-year-old filmmaker Joe Berlinger of the award-winning documentary "Brother's Keeper."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richard Winton
On this stretch of Stone Canyon Road in Bel-Air, Robert Bandler was known as “the color of the neighborhood.” He often wore fatigues and a military hat. He once crashed a wedding across the street. Ended some conversations by saying “over and out” and played historic war speeches late at night, loud enough for neighbors to hear. Los Angeles police officers knew him well from numerous call-outs to the home for odd behavior. Officers who patrolled the area even gave him a nickname: “Crazy Bob.” “He was the talk of the neighborhood, he was the color of the neighborhood,” said 73-year-old Stephen Verona, who lives across the street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | By Ari Bloomekatz and Richard Winton
On this stretch of Stone Canyon Road in Bel-Air, Robert Bandler was known as "the color of the neighborhood. " He often wore fatigues and a military hat. He once crashed a wedding across the street. He ended some conversations by saying "over and out" and played historic war speeches late at night, loud enough for neighbors to hear. Los Angeles police officers knew him well from numerous calls to the home for odd behavior. Officers who patrolled the area even gave him a nickname: "Crazy Bob. " "He was the talk of the neighborhood, he was the color of the neighborhood," said 73-year-old Stephen Verona, who lives across the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
In her role as a counterculture den mother to a group of suburban would-be rock stars in the new musical "The Black Suits," Annie Golden isn't just going through the motions. She knows rock 'n' roll. The 62-year-old actress was the lead singer of the Brooklyn-based punk band the Shirts in the 1970s. She was discovered by director Milos Forman when the band was headlining the legendary East Village rock club CBGB, and he cast her in his 1979 film adaptation of "Hair. " Although she has acted on Broadway, in movies and on TV - including most recently on the hit Netflix series "Orange Is the New Black" - she still relates to her rebellious roots.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
Chances are good that Harry Dean Stanton, the prolific character actor with the face of a backwoods prophet, will be the subject of a straightforward career-retrospective documentary someday. For now we have something that's more in tune with the man: Sophie Huber's lyrical and enigmatic portrait, "Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction. " At the film's heart is a fitful conversation that unfolds like a string of koans, epigrams, jokes and silences. And songs. A reluctant interviewee with no interest in biographical facts, Stanton would rather sing than yak. The unrepentant loner says he's "not psychologically wired for institutions"; nonetheless, within the moviemaking system he's amassed 200-plus film credits and counting.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Like it were planned, and perhaps it was, American fans of Chris O'Dowd left bereft by the end of Christopher Guest's HBO series "Family Tree" may jump, as from a lovely frying pan into a really nice fire, to O'Dowd's own "Moone Boy," which begins streaming Wednesday on Hulu. As it happens - and not surprisingly, given that the improvisatory "Family Tree" made much use of O'Dowd's own voice - the two series have a lot in common. Both are sweet and a little eccentric, interested in small things and informed by the creator-star's seeming good nature, though perhaps that is just the soft music of the accent.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency is the size of a small town, with more than 30,000 employees and as much variety. There are blue-haired iconoclasts who work in their socks, buttoned-down military types and pale-faced introverts who avoid eye contact in the hallways. On the surface, at least, Edward Snowden was hardly unusual at America's largest and most powerful intelligence agency. A self-taught computer whiz who wanted to travel the world, Snowden seemed a perfect fit for a secretive organization that spies on communications from foreign terrorism suspects.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1986 | CRAIG LEE
Group: Blancmange. Personnel: Neil Arthur, vocals, drums, clarinet; Stephen Luscombe, keyboards, trumpet; David Rhodes, guitar; James Hildreth, drums; Bernita Turner, vocals; Violet Mason, vocals. History: This English duet--Arthur and Luscombe are the two real members--first gained notice when it contributed a track to the "Some Bizarre" compilation album in '81. Soon the group began touring, opening for performers like Grace Jones, Depeche Mode and Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1986 | KRISTINA McKENNA
"ALEX CHILTON." Alex Chilton. Big Time Records. In modest increments cult-pop legend Alex Chilton is edging his way back into the music business. After years of silence, this is his second release in less than 12 months, and a strange one it is--but then, Chilton's raging eccentricity always has been one of his central charms.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
"The Goodwin Games" is family comedy debuting as a late midseason replacement with only a seven-episode order. So even at Fox, a network not known for hit comedies, hopes are not high. On the other hand, there is a lot of talk these days of rethinking the old models of American television, including making the standard network season (22 to 24 episodes) more like the cable model of 10 to 12. At this year's upfronts, where networks roll out their new fall lineups for advertisers in New York City, Fox discussed several "limited" or "event" series.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Christopher Guest, the director of "Best in Show" and "A Mighty Wind," has made a TV series for HBO. The eight-episode "Family Tree," which premieres Sunday, is his first work in seven years, and like his films it is sweet and funny and not a little melancholy. Guest gives the world a quarter-twist toward the ridiculous, without losing sight of the human dreams and strivings, obsessions and accommodations that are his main and constant subject. The new series, which opens in England before moving in its second half to America, stars Chris O'Dowd, an Irish comic actor who has been insinuating himself little by little into the American consciousness; he was in "Bridesmaids" and "This Is 40" and had a recurring role in the first season of "Girls," and many will know him as the star of the British sitcom "The IT Crowd.
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