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Echinacea

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NEWS
December 20, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Echinacea has been used as a common cold remedy for years, but does it really work? In a recent study, researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison tested 719 patients who were coming down with a cold to see whether echinacea was effective in curing their symptoms. The study looked at four groups: some given no pills, some given a placebo, and two groups that received echinacea. Those who received echinacea were given 10.2 grams of the dried root during the first 24 hours and 5.1 grams over the next four days.
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NEWS
December 20, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, For the Los Angeles Times
Echinacea has been used as a common cold remedy for years, but does it really work? In a recent study, researchers from the University of Wisconsin at Madison tested 719 patients who were coming down with a cold to see whether echinacea was effective in curing their symptoms. The study looked at four groups: some given no pills, some given a placebo, and two groups that received echinacea. Those who received echinacea were given 10.2 grams of the dried root during the first 24 hours and 5.1 grams over the next four days.
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HEALTH
December 9, 2002 | Shari Roan
Sometime in the late 19th century, both Europeans and North Americans realized that the herb echinacea was a medicinal gift from nature. In 1919, noted anthropologist Melvin Gilmore remarked in a study of the Plains Indians that "echinacea seems to have been used as a remedy for more ailments than any other plant." A member of the sunflower family, echinacea remains a popular herb. Nine species are found in North America, but only three (E. pallida, E. angustifolia and E.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The herbal remedy echinacea can prevent colds and speed recovery from runny noses, coughs and other symptoms, according to a study published Sunday that could renew interest in the discredited product. The analysis of 1,600 patients pooled from 14 previously published studies found that echinacea reduced the chances of catching a cold by 58% and shaved 1.4 days off the duration of a cold, researchers said.
HEALTH
March 31, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange, Special to The Times
Herbal remedies are a multibillion-dollar business in the United States, and 10% of the sales are for echinacea, an herb that is thought to stimulate the immune system. Consumers take it in an attempt to prevent the common cold or relieve its symptoms but, a new study concludes, most of them are not getting what they pay for.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Echinacea, a popular over-the-counter herbal cold remedy, stimulates the immune system, according to preliminary University of Florida research results. Susan Percival, a nutritional scientist, said the first clinical study of the herb's effect on healthy men found that it helped stimulate the white blood cells that fight infection.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2005 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Echinacea, the popular herbal remedy used for the common cold, does not ward off runny noses, sore throats or headaches, nor does it help speed recovery from cold symptoms, according to the results of a broad clinical trial reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Taken with other recent studies that showed no benefit from echinacea, the new findings shift the burden of proof to proponents of herbal products to demonstrate that the plant has medicinal value, researchers said.
HEALTH
December 7, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Margery Walsh swears by the herb echinacea. She keeps it handy during cold and flu season and begins taking it at the first sign of a cold. "I find that it definitely lessens the severity of a cold," the Westlake Village woman says. "It doesn't keep me from not getting it, but I don't feel like crawling under the covers." Walsh has plenty of company. Echinacea is one of the most popular herbal remedies in the United States: A recent poll found that 7% of Americans had used it.
HEALTH
December 8, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Echinacea is thought to rev up the immune system, helping the body beat back viral invasions. Adults have long relied on it to ease cold symptoms. Many give it to their children. But a new study of the herb's effects on kids has found that it neither cut the duration of their colds nor lessened their symptoms. Researchers studied 707 upper respiratory infections in more than 400 otherwise healthy kids ages 2 to 11 who were seen either in traditional or alternative medical practices.
HEALTH
December 22, 1997 | MARCIDA DODSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bottles and boxes fill an entire aisle, offering all-natural relief from a cornucopia of ailments: memory loss, insomnia, hay fever, enlarged prostate, menstrual cramps, depression, back pain, headaches. The products--ginkgo biloba, valerian, red clover, saw palmetto, feverfew, St. John's wort, milk thistle, cat's claw, echinacea--used to be found only in a botanist's guide or a health-food store.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2005 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Echinacea, the popular herbal remedy used for the common cold, does not ward off runny noses, sore throats or headaches, nor does it help speed recovery from cold symptoms, according to the results of a broad clinical trial reported today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Taken with other recent studies that showed no benefit from echinacea, the new findings shift the burden of proof to proponents of herbal products to demonstrate that the plant has medicinal value, researchers said.
HEALTH
December 8, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Echinacea is thought to rev up the immune system, helping the body beat back viral invasions. Adults have long relied on it to ease cold symptoms. Many give it to their children. But a new study of the herb's effects on kids has found that it neither cut the duration of their colds nor lessened their symptoms. Researchers studied 707 upper respiratory infections in more than 400 otherwise healthy kids ages 2 to 11 who were seen either in traditional or alternative medical practices.
HEALTH
March 31, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange, Special to The Times
Herbal remedies are a multibillion-dollar business in the United States, and 10% of the sales are for echinacea, an herb that is thought to stimulate the immune system. Consumers take it in an attempt to prevent the common cold or relieve its symptoms but, a new study concludes, most of them are not getting what they pay for.
HEALTH
December 9, 2002 | Shari Roan
Sometime in the late 19th century, both Europeans and North Americans realized that the herb echinacea was a medicinal gift from nature. In 1919, noted anthropologist Melvin Gilmore remarked in a study of the Plains Indians that "echinacea seems to have been used as a remedy for more ailments than any other plant." A member of the sunflower family, echinacea remains a popular herb. Nine species are found in North America, but only three (E. pallida, E. angustifolia and E.
HEALTH
January 7, 2002 | BARRIE R. CASSILETH
Over hundreds of years, a host of folk medicines has emerged for treating colds and flus. None cure, but many reduce the impact of symptoms. Echinacea may be the most promising and popular of the herbal remedies. Dried extracts of this daisy-like flowering plant come in tablet or capsule form and are almost universally available in health food stores and pharmacies. Echinacea has been well studied.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2001 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The health supplement industry, which made the exotic echinacea plant a modern alternative to chicken soup, is scrambling to find a cure for its sales malaise. Americans last year reduced purchases of vitamins, herbs and other health supplements for the first time since 1994, a sign that consumers have become skeptical of natural remedies marketed for maladies ranging from sniffles to depression.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2007 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
The herbal remedy echinacea can prevent colds and speed recovery from runny noses, coughs and other symptoms, according to a study published Sunday that could renew interest in the discredited product. The analysis of 1,600 patients pooled from 14 previously published studies found that echinacea reduced the chances of catching a cold by 58% and shaved 1.4 days off the duration of a cold, researchers said.
HEALTH
January 7, 2002 | BARRIE R. CASSILETH
Over hundreds of years, a host of folk medicines has emerged for treating colds and flus. None cure, but many reduce the impact of symptoms. Echinacea may be the most promising and popular of the herbal remedies. Dried extracts of this daisy-like flowering plant come in tablet or capsule form and are almost universally available in health food stores and pharmacies. Echinacea has been well studied.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Echinacea, a popular over-the-counter herbal cold remedy, stimulates the immune system, according to preliminary University of Florida research results. Susan Percival, a nutritional scientist, said the first clinical study of the herb's effect on healthy men found that it helped stimulate the white blood cells that fight infection.
HEALTH
December 7, 1998 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Margery Walsh swears by the herb echinacea. She keeps it handy during cold and flu season and begins taking it at the first sign of a cold. "I find that it definitely lessens the severity of a cold," the Westlake Village woman says. "It doesn't keep me from not getting it, but I don't feel like crawling under the covers." Walsh has plenty of company. Echinacea is one of the most popular herbal remedies in the United States: A recent poll found that 7% of Americans had used it.
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