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OPINION
December 12, 1993
I am one of the few people who were born and raised around Echo Park and still live very close. I live in the Bunker Hill Towers. I am told, for physical reasons, to walk two to three miles every day. So for the first time in probably 30-40 years I took a walk around Echo Lake where I hung out as a child. It was delightful to see all the young adults, mostly Latinos, with their children having a wonderful time with the new playground, and everybody doing their own thing. But where I was very disappointed was all the garbage and foam cups around the lake.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
Nancy Smith and her family were strolling around Echo Park Lake on Thursday when they noticed an odd, brown patch in the water. Smith visited the lake as recently as August and recalled that back then, its bright green lotus plants shot into the air. But on the day after Christmas, the wilted bed of bronze flowers before her drooped onto the water like a sea of broken miniature umbrellas. "I've walked around this park in the winter and I don't remember it ever quite looking like this," said Smith, 56, a lawyer from La Crescenta.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
A few weeks ago, an ace page designer for The Times named Pamela Wilson looked up from her desk and asked, "What's going to happen to the turtles?" She was referring to the hundreds of red-eared slider turtles that over the years have taken up residence in Echo Lake, north of downtown Los Angeles. Most are descendants of pets dumped into the lake, and they're very, very cute. The city is scheduled to drain the lake in 2010 and make about $90 million in fixes to clean up its water quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Matt Stevens
When Echo Park Lake reopened earlier this year after a $45-million makeover, locals flocked to see the newly installed lotus plants, which were making their return to the lake after a mutiyear absence.   So this winter, some passersby have looked at the lake and become alarmed. For weeks now, the bright green lotus leaves that once shot into the air have become brown and wilted. The bed of flowers now droop onto the water like a sea of broken miniature umbrellas. The scene has left some residents and visitors wondering: Did the plants die again?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2007 | Ashley Surdin, Times Staff Writer
Two landmark Los Angeles lakes will be cleaned up and restored with bond funding approved Wednesday by the City Council. On a unanimous vote, the council allocated $58 million in Proposition O money for six water-quality projects, including $23 million to begin the cleanup of Echo Lake, north of downtown, and Lake Machado in Harbor City. The council also set aside an additional $178 million for future phases of the two lake projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Carlos Lozano
After a two-year, $45-million makeover, Echo Park Lake will reopen to the public Saturday morning with a ceremony that will include Mayor-elect Eric Garcetti. The festivities are scheduled from 10 a.m. until noon. The park is located in the 1700 block of Park Avenue. The lake was completely drained and cleaned before being refilled and restocked with plants. A clay liner was installed to reduce water leakage through the lake bottom. The 29-acre lake was originally built in the 1860s as a reservoir for drinking water.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Ever since Echo Park Lake was closed two years ago for a $20-million face lift, I've been dreaming of what it would be like to have a real cafe in the park. Promises had been made that when the park reopened, its early-20th-century boathouse would serve food and coffee. That day has now dawned. During my morning run (OK, it was more like a fast walk), I passed the boathouse and was excited to see a smattering of tables out front with a few people eating sandwiches served on simple cardboard trays.
HEALTH
July 19, 2013 | Charles Fleming
For the last two years, Echo Park Lake has been hidden behind chain link and plastic tarp. Now, after a makeover, the fountains are flowing, the water is clear, the lotuses are back and people are using the park. The space is the urban gem its designers imagined more than a century ago, when nearby Angelino Heights was one of the city's premier addresses. 1. Start walking from the corner of Glendale Boulevard and Park Avenue, and find your way to the wide paved pathway that circles the lake.
NEWS
March 4, 1993
Echo Park Lake was stocked with hundreds of rainbow trout last week as part of a California Department of Fish and Game program to provide trout fishing opportunities to city dwellers. Echo Park, one of five urban lakes in the program, received about 400 pounds of trout (between 700 to 800 half-pound fish) from the Fillmore Hatchery in Ventura County, according to hatchery manager Jim Adams. He said that this is the first time the lake has been planted with fish in six years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Hundreds of Angelenos turned out Saturday to celebrate and welcome back Echo Park Lake after a $45-million, two-year renovation. They photographed its new beds of lotus plants, climbed its playground equipment and marveled at the clarity of the lake water, which used to be a notoriously dark stew of toxic runoff. “It was the heart of Echo Park, but it was in need of a triple bypass,” Los Angeles Mayor-elect Eric Garcetti said at a morning ceremony marking the lake's and park's formal reopening.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Ever since Echo Park Lake was closed two years ago for a $20-million face lift, I've been dreaming of what it would be like to have a real cafe in the park. Promises had been made that when the park reopened, its early-20th-century boathouse would serve food and coffee. That day has now dawned. During my morning run (OK, it was more like a fast walk), I passed the boathouse and was excited to see a smattering of tables out front with a few people eating sandwiches served on simple cardboard trays.
HEALTH
July 19, 2013 | Charles Fleming
For the last two years, Echo Park Lake has been hidden behind chain link and plastic tarp. Now, after a makeover, the fountains are flowing, the water is clear, the lotuses are back and people are using the park. The space is the urban gem its designers imagined more than a century ago, when nearby Angelino Heights was one of the city's premier addresses. 1. Start walking from the corner of Glendale Boulevard and Park Avenue, and find your way to the wide paved pathway that circles the lake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Carlos Lozano
After a two-year, $45-million makeover, Echo Park Lake will reopen to the public Saturday morning with a ceremony that will include Mayor-elect Eric Garcetti. The festivities are scheduled from 10 a.m. until noon. The park is located in the 1700 block of Park Avenue. The lake was completely drained and cleaned before being refilled and restocked with plants. A clay liner was installed to reduce water leakage through the lake bottom. The 29-acre lake was originally built in the 1860s as a reservoir for drinking water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Hundreds of Angelenos turned out Saturday to celebrate and welcome back Echo Park Lake after a $45-million, two-year renovation. They photographed its new beds of lotus plants, climbed its playground equipment and marveled at the clarity of the lake water, which used to be a notoriously dark stew of toxic runoff. “It was the heart of Echo Park, but it was in need of a triple bypass,” Los Angeles Mayor-elect Eric Garcetti said at a morning ceremony marking the lake's and park's formal reopening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
What do you do when an old friend undergoes an expensive and major surgery, remains in seclusion for two years and now is stripping off most of the bandages? In the case of Echo Park Lake, hundreds of Angelenos turned out Saturday to celebrate and welcome back the beloved body of water and surrounding parklands after a $45-million, two-year renovation. They ambled down retopped pathways, photographed new beds of lotus plants, climbed playground equipment and marveled at the clarity of the lake water, which used to be a notoriously dark stew of toxic runoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber, Los Angeles Times
Randy McDonald darted his eyes between the lotus bed and a pack of police officers, wondering if he could get away with it. He figured it was worth a try and walked from Echo Park Lake back to his car. After opening the glove compartment, he pulled out a hacksaw blade and stuck it into his back pocket. He tugged his T-shirt to cover it and returned to the lake. He worked his way through the thick crowd of revelers gathered for the 28th annual Lotus Festival and then crouched down at the water's edge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2012 | Steve Lopez
On May 27, Vicente Vasquez was digging into the bed of Echo Park Lake with his backhoe when he scraped a solid object buried under 4 feet of muck. What could it be? During the city's months-long dredging and rebuilding of the lake, workers have found lots of old bottles and assorted junk, but nothing sexy or sensational. No bodies, no bones, no rusted weapons used in unsolved crimes. Vasquez cleared a space around his discovery and saw the outlines of the buried treasure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
What do you do when an old friend undergoes an expensive and major surgery, remains in seclusion for two years and now is stripping off most of the bandages? In the case of Echo Park Lake, hundreds of Angelenos turned out Saturday to celebrate and welcome back the beloved body of water and surrounding parklands after a $45-million, two-year renovation. They ambled down retopped pathways, photographed new beds of lotus plants, climbed playground equipment and marveled at the clarity of the lake water, which used to be a notoriously dark stew of toxic runoff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2013 | Marisa Gerber
After its two-year, $45-million makeover, Echo Park Lake will soon shed the green tarp-covered fence that lines its circumference, revealing to the public a similar-but-spruced-up version of the neighborhood's landmark. "Welcome to 29 acres of paradise," L.A. City Engineer Gary Moore said at a news conference Friday, where officials announced the lake would reopen June 15. Before it was refilled and restocked with plants, the lake was completely drained and cleaned. During the cleanup, Moore said, workers found two guns, one toilet, 20 Frisbees and a pay telephone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2013 | By Marisa Gerber
After its two-year, $45-million makeover, Echo Park Lake will soon shed the green tarp-covered fence that lines its circumference, revealing to the public a similar-but-spruced-up version of the neighborhood's landmark. “Welcome to 29 acres of paradise,” L.A. City Engineer Gary Moore said at news conference Friday, where officials announced the lake would reopen June 15. Before it was refilled and restocked with plants, the lake was completely drained and cleaned. During the clean up, Moore said, workers found two guns, one toilet, 20 Frisbees and a pay telephone.
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