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June 30, 2010
'The Twilight Saga: Eclipse' MPAA rating: PG-13 for intense sequences of action and violence, and some sensuality Running time: 2 hours, 4 minutes Playing: In general release
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SCIENCE
April 16, 2014 | Deborah Netburn and Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the total lunar eclipse known as a "blood moon. " Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles offered a prime view, and hundreds of people were there when the eclipse began at 10:58 p.m. Monday. The full moon was beginning to move into Earth's shadow, leaving the impression that someone had taken a bite out of it. As the minutes passed, the shadow spread across more and more of the lunar surface.
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SCIENCE
November 2, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
There's a solar eclipse coming Sunday morning, and you can watch it live, right here. Beginning at 3:45 a.m. PST, the online observatory Slooh.com will stream the solar eclipse live from a remote part of the Kenyan countryside. The broadcast will last for 3 1/2 hours, ending at 7:15 a.m. and will also include live feeds from telescopes in Gabon, Africa, and the Canary Islands. You'll find it playing in the video box above. Why do you need to watch the total eclipse online? Because unless you live along a very narrow band of land on the African continent, it won't be visible from where you live.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
Alhambra High School was evacuated Tuesday morning while authorities investigated reports of a gas leak. Before school started, someone reported smelling gas in a classroom. Authorities evacuated the campus while officials tracked the source of the smell and stopped it, according to the Alhambra police Facebook page . Authorities could not say when students would be allowed to return to their classrooms; hazardous materials teams were en route. Police limited traffic on the streets surrounding the school.
SCIENCE
November 1, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
There's a rare hybrid solar eclipse coming on Sunday, and no matter where you are in the world, you will be able to see it - thanks to the Internet. If you live on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, in parts of southern Europe or anywhere in Africa, then you can enjoy this eclipse firsthand with a little planning and the proper viewing glasses , of course. If you live in Los Angeles or somewhere that is not any of the places mentioned above, then you will have to turn to your computer if you want to watch the eclipse live.  Luckily, Paul Cox, an astronomer at the online observatory Slooh.com, is shepherding a telescope and other equipment to a remote spot in Kenya, where he plans to live-stream the total eclipse to viewers across the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Alicia Banks and Rong-Gong Lin II
With just a few hours left before the the first total eclipse of 2014, the Griffith Observatory is bracing for big crowds tonight and is warning of possible traffic jams for the "blood moon. " "We are expecting large crowds," the observatory said in a statement. "Those attending should expect traffic congestion and long walks from parking. " The observatory will be open to visitors, who can look up at the eclipse either from the building itself or from the grass and sidewalk areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
The first total eclipse of 2014 tonight and Tuesday morning is generating much attention. Times reporter Rong-Gong Lin II answers your questions about the so-called blood moon. Q: Will L.A. be able to see this eclipse? It will be the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. The last one began the evening of Dec. 20, 2010, with the eclipse's peak at 12:17 a.m. Dec. 21, according to the observatory. Q: When is the best time to watch?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
The crowd packed on the grassy lawn of Griffith Observatory erupted in whistles, cheers and howls shortly before 12:05 a.m. on Tuesday as a darkened moon transformed into an orange "blood moon" for the start of a total lunar eclipse. Visitors scrambled toward the front of the observatory, pointing up at the reddening moon. Telescopes dotting the lawn pointed upward and southward, as the moon hovered above. Around 11 p.m., a "bite" began to spread across the moon as the Earth blocked direct light from the sun, casting a shadow on the moon.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
The penumbral lunar eclipse has started and is visible on a live stream courtesy of Slooh, a community observatory that makes live images available to the broader public. The live stream offers a bit of solace to U.S. West Coast residents who will have only about a 20-minute window to catch the subtle shading of the moon as it passes through Earth's outer shadow, or penumbra. The moon will pass deepest into the penumbral shadow at 4:50 p.m. PDT, well before sunset on the West Coast.
SCIENCE
October 18, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
On Friday evening, the moon will pass through the hazy outer shadow of the Earth, and if you look carefully, you may be able to see the minor celestial show. The event is called a penumbral eclipse, and, to be fair, it is not especially dramatic. The outer shadow of the Earth known as the penumbra is not dark enough to fully obscure the moon; instead it will just sort of darken it a bit. PHOTOS: Moons of the solar system Here in Southern California, your window of opportunity to witness the minor lunar eclipse will be fairly short.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
They came with iPhones, iPads, digital cameras and even some film cameras -- ready to capture the "blood moon," the first full lunar eclipse of 2014. Hundreds converged on Griffith Observatory, which has a prime view. Here are some photos of the eclipse posted to various social media from the observatory on Tuesday morning:  [<a href="//storify.com/shelbygrad/full-lunar-eclipse-capturing-blood-moon-live" target="_blank">View the story "Full lunar eclipse: Capturing 'blood moon' live" on Storify</a>]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By a Los Angeles Times staff writer
  Monday's "blood moon" total lunar eclipse was the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. Hundreds flocked to Griffith Observatory, cameras, cellphones and iPads at the ready to see the rare event. Some came hours before the lunar spectacle, but a hush fell over the balconies and grassy lawn as the eclipse began and onlookers jockeyed for prime viewing spots.  In Los Angeles , the most impressive part began about 11 p.m. when the first "bite" was taken out of the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Those who slept through the rare "blood moon" Monday night missed more than just the rare red hue, as a packed Griffith Observatory erupted into whistles, cheers and howls during the much-anticipated lunar eclipse. The crowds descended upon the observatory early, with hundreds of people lounging on the lawn hours before the eclipse was set to begin at about 11 p.m. The observatory and the Los Angeles Astronomical Society, as well as other astronomy clubs and organizations, offered telescopes for viewers. As forecasters had predicted, clear skies made for for prime viewing conditions across the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
The crowd packed on the grassy lawn of Griffith Observatory erupted in whistles, cheers and howls shortly before 12:05 a.m. on Tuesday as a darkened moon transformed into an orange "blood moon" for the start of a total lunar eclipse. Visitors scrambled toward the front of the observatory, pointing up at the reddening moon. Telescopes dotting the lawn pointed upward and southward, as the moon hovered above. Around 11 p.m., a "bite" began to spread across the moon as the Earth blocked direct light from the sun, casting a shadow on the moon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By A Times Staff Writer
The first total eclipse of 2014 tonight and Tuesday morning is generating much attention. Times reporter Rong-Gong Lin II answers your questions about the so-called blood moon. Q: Will L.A. be able to see this eclipse? It will be the first in more than three years to be visible from Los Angeles and uninterrupted by sunrise. The last one began the evening of Dec. 20, 2010, with the eclipse's peak at 12:17 a.m. Dec. 21, according to the observatory. Q: When is the best time to watch?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By a Times Staff Writer
The first lunar eclipse of 2014 - known as "blood moon" - is lighting up social media tonight as people post photos of the moon and the eclipse. Large crowd descended on the Griffith Observatory to look at the eclipse. They posted a variety of photos on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Here is a sampling:   In Los Angeles, the most impressive part began around 11 p.m. when the first "bite" is taken out of the moon. It will be blotted out entirely by 12:06 a.m. Tuesday, said experts at the observatory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Alicia Banks
Johanna Huerta will usher in her 30 th birthday early Tuesday with the “blood moon.” Huerta, 29, of South Los Angeles, was one of hundreds of people who descended on the Griffith Observatory on Monday night awaiting the first total eclipse of 2014. "It worked out that I got the 'blood moon,' " she said. "It will be my first time seeing it. " Huerta brought her brother, 17-year-old Angel, and family friend Flavia Ibarra, 23, to celebrate her birthday and the eclipse, which will be her first to see. “I dragged them with me,” Huerta said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II and Alicia Banks
Officials at the Griffith Observatory are expecting big crowds for the dark red "blood moon," the first total eclipse of 2014 beginning Monday night. The observatory will be open for visitors, who can look up at the eclipse either from the building itself or from the grass and sidewalk areas. Experts will also provide presentations on the eclipse. The hours of operation are 7 p.m. to 1:45 a.m. It is also expected that people will flock to other areas where they can see the eclipse, including mountain and desert areas with less light pollution.
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