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Ecological Disaster

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NEWS
April 27, 1988 | Associated Press
The state Water Quality Control Board labeled Shell Oil's 175,000-gallon oil spill an "ecological disaster" today as the wildlife death toll rose to 130 birds and dozens of small marsh animals. Larry Kolb, the regional board's leading engineer, said there is no doubt of the magnitude of the spill's serious consequences, echoing biologists' estimates that it might take a year for the highly prized marshlands to recover from Saturday's spill at the Martinez refinery.
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WORLD
August 5, 2011 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
After half a century of oil spills, Nigeria's troubled Niger Delta is one of the most polluted places on Earth, and it could take $1 billion and 30 years to clean up the mess, according to a U.N. report released Thursday. A 14-month study by the United Nations Environment Program that was commissioned by the Nigerian government examined 200 locations and 75 miles of pipeline, more than 4,000 soil and water samples and the medical reports of 5,000 people. "Pollution from over 50 years of oil operations in the region has penetrated further and deeper than many may have supposed," the report says.
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NEWS
April 25, 1993
How refreshing to read an upbeat article. The positive, charming, color photo showed a modestly dressed, happy family of Dad, Mom and 10 children--the non-traditional family of modern times. The article had an up-beat viewpoint. Where were the whining comments? Too many mouths to feed . . . Not enough rent subsidy . . . No county assistance . . . Lax school system . . . What can youth do--not enough places to go. Those youngsters don't have time to question and whine of "nothing to do."
OPINION
May 28, 2010 | Danny Heitman
The oil spill disaster off the coast of my home state of Louisiana is stark evidence that humans have an awesome power to change the natural landscape, often for the worse. But landscapes also have the power to change us, as John James Audubon was reminded when he arrived in Louisiana in 1821. In Louisiana, Audubon encountered a biblical abundance of wildlife that transformed him and his bird art, enlarging his sense of possibility and refining his genius as an observer of the natural world.
NEWS
May 10, 1987 | MICHAEL WEISSKOPF, The Washington Post
Shinobu Sakamoto struggles every morning to button her blouse. She manages fitfully to reach her mouth with most of her breakfast rice. Then she sets forth to work, walking in tortuous, jerky movements and contemplating, she said in badly slurred speech, "what it must be like to run, to feel free."
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | RHONDA HILLBERY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Is Marjorie Kline a back-yard environmentalist or a lawn slob? It's getting harder to make the call in an age where the traditional, manicured lawn is under attack as an ecological disaster. Eschewing lawn mowers and commercial fertilizers, Kline has gradually gone natural, planting tree seedlings and wildflowers. Her shaggy front lawn contains liberal doses of clover and violets. Her mowers? Two pygmy goats named Lewis and Clark.
NEWS
January 14, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the height of the season in Pattaya, one of the biggest moneymakers in Thailand's tourism boom. The Gulf of Thailand is an obliging ultramarine, the sun sparkles brilliantly and the coconut palms along the beach even manage to seem sultry. But no one is frolicking in the water. The beach is almost deserted. Although there is not a single warning sign along the one-mile strip of Pattaya's beach, word of mouth has effectively spread the word: Pattaya's water is dangerously polluted.
NEWS
October 22, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time anyone could remember, the Virgin came to the lake, the guest of honor at a thanksgiving celebration. Carried on the shoulders of the faithful, the yard-high image of the Virgin of the Rosary, brought here by Spanish missionaries in 1531, led the procession through cobblestone streets to an outdoor Mass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1990
Any oil spill that kills any amount of wildlife is an ecological disaster. The oil spill of Feb. 7 off the Orange County coast has killed more than 100 birds and other sea life, and the count will climb higher as the long-term effects of the spill become known. To blame one company for spilling the oil is a gross miscalculation of Southern California's interests. Most people in this country use oil in one way or another, and these interests are the real cause of the spill. As with any other man-made disaster, this spill shouldn't have happened.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
I was sickened to read architecture critic Aaron Betsky's rhapsodizing over the architectural splendors of Century City (Times, March 14). To those of us who live near Century City, it represents, above all, an infinite source of obnoxious traffic and disruption in what was once a bucolic residential haven. From my view, Century City ranks as an ecological disaster to the Westside akin to the magnitude of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The difference between the two is that Century City was a premeditated assault upon the community--Exxon Valdez was an accident abetted by negligence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2006 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
More than two decades after toxic farm drainage emptying into a small wildlife refuge stilled the chatter of migrating waterfowl with death and deformity, the federal government is on the verge of deciding what to do with vast amounts of tainted irrigation water still produced by San Joaquin Valley croplands. The selenium-spiked flows that poisoned ponds at Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge were shut down long ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2003 | Louis Sahagun, Times Staff Writer
Scientists have uncovered a distressing secret about the lakebed of the Salton Sea: Portions of it are covered with a 50-foot-thick layer of silt the consistency of peanut butter. That revelation is particularly troubling for California's largest lake, a place of promise and despair that has endured three decades of scientific study and political haggling.
TRAVEL
June 8, 2003 | Kyle Henley, Special to The Times
I cast the fly rod, my right arm snapping back and then forward. The line curled through the air, and the imitation fly landed behind a rock 20 feet upstream. It swirled in the clear water for a few seconds, then gently drifted down the river. The fly, a caddis -- meant to resemble the larva of the moth-like caddis fly -- bobbed and dipped as the current pulled it. It drifted past me, and I started to lift my rod to make another cast. Wham! The line jerked, and the rod came to life.
OPINION
November 21, 2002
Re "Glacier Park on Thin Ice," Nov. 18: So the glaciers in Glacier National Park will be history within 30 years. It boggles the mind. How can the Bush administration arrogantly strip away so many hard-won environmental protections when "most scientists agree the recent warming is mainly a product of industrial activity." Surely it must filter up to President Bush, Interior Secretary Gale Norton, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman and Vice President Dick Cheney that global warming is endangering humanity.
NEWS
July 15, 2001 | UAMDAO NOIKORN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Outward emotions are rare in this village. Grown-ups stare into nothing. Children run around without a word or sit motionless. Some kids alternate between breathless activity and death-like lethargy. As fictional as it sounds, the horrors of Klity Lang village are real, unequivocal proof that havoc caused by human actions knows no ecological boundaries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2000
Re "Park Plan Gives Wildlife a Way," March 17: To see that the Orange County River Park is finally coming to fruition is really great news for Orange County residents, at least those of us who care about saving some open space for wildlife and people. The next step is to shoot down one of the most damaging toll-road plans of all time, now in the planning stage: to build a toll road covering 10 miles of the Santa Ana River. The proposed toll road would destroy 10 miles of feeding grounds for shorebirds and also destroy the Santa Ana River Trail, a 50-mile urban wonder.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | KINKY FRIEDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The only thing more unpleasant than a well-versed liberal is an intelligent conservative. In the case P.J. O'Rourke and "All the Trouble in the World" we have an intelligent conservative who's also effete, sartorially smug, in a state of perpetual preppiness and somewhere to the right of Judge Robert Bork, traveling to Haiti, Somalia, Bangladesh, Vietnam, what used to be Yugoslavia, what used to be Czechoslovakia and what used to be a pristine rain forest before he got there.
NEWS
April 25, 1993
How refreshing to read an upbeat article. The positive, charming, color photo showed a modestly dressed, happy family of Dad, Mom and 10 children--the non-traditional family of modern times. The article had an up-beat viewpoint. Where were the whining comments? Too many mouths to feed . . . Not enough rent subsidy . . . No county assistance . . . Lax school system . . . What can youth do--not enough places to go. Those youngsters don't have time to question and whine of "nothing to do."
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