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BUSINESS
June 5, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA
Since its formation a year ago, ECompanies has incubated an average of one new company each month. So far, only Icebox has officially left the incubator (it moved to offices in Culver City). ECompanies' venture arm has made investments in 29 Internet companies. Here is a sampling of the start-ups in the ECompanies stable: SANTA MONICA INCUBATOR: Business.com: Helps businesspeople find business information on the Web. Change.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA
Since its formation a year ago, ECompanies has incubated an average of one new company each month. So far, only Icebox has officially left the incubator (it moved to offices in Culver City). ECompanies' venture arm has made investments in 29 Internet companies. Here is a sampling of the start-ups in the ECompanies stable: SANTA MONICA INCUBATOR: Business.com: Helps businesspeople find business information on the Web. Change.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CNN is using the move of "Moneyline" co-anchor Willow Bay to Los Angeles as an opportunity to expand its West Coast coverage of the "new economy" of high technology, biotechnology and the Pacific Rim. Bay, who has been co-anchoring CNN's flagship financial program from New York since summer, is moving to the West Coast with her husband, Robert Iger, newly named president of Walt Disney Co. She'll begin co-anchoring from Los Angeles late this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2001 | ACHRENE SICAKYUZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Forty-seven veterans of World War II's Easy Company returned to Normandy last week, all clad in yellow jackets labeled with the title of the upcoming HBO miniseries that retells their story. They came with their families to mark D-day, that famous 6th of June 57 years ago when, as young U.S Army paratroopers, they became the first Americans to jump through the clouds and behind enemy lines to fight the German invasion. Many are now in their 80s.
NEWS
September 28, 2000 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Time was, the beer-drinking sessions on the roof of the Industry Standard's headquarters were a way for magazine staffers to unwind after a tough work week. Not so anymore. The TGIF gatherings atop the red brick building have evolved into a coveted invitation-only event at the ad-rich journal, which chronicles the ebb and flow of the new economy. It's a place to be seen and schmooze with other players on the high-tech fast track.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
While most of us were being squeaky-clean in our online activities, a rather dirty war recently broke out in cyberspace over the selling of dirty e-books on Amazon and elsewhere. The affair raises numerous issues of non-prurient interest. The controversy first erupted in the British press. That's appropriate, since it was the British author Charles Dickens who gave us the term "pecksniff. " (See his " Martin Chuzzlewit . ") There the online publication the Kernel unearthed "hundreds of e-books that celebrate graphic rape, incest and 'forced sex' with young girls available for sale from online retailer Amazon.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It seems everyone wants in on the venture capital game these days: investment bankers, lawyers, college students--and now accountants. Arthur Andersen last week unveiled a $500-million venture fund targeting Internet start-ups, and, of course, much of the money will be invested in California, according to Paul Keglevic, managing partner of the company's Pacific region. "Everyone is trying to figure out what this new economy means and what it means to them," Keglevic said.
NEWS
August 17, 2001 | DAVID STREITFELD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Industry Standard, a magazine that celebrated and symbolized the technology boom, closed Thursday. Barely 3 years old, the Standard rose rapidly with the "new economy" before falling victim to the old. When tech stocks crested in the spring of 2000, the Standard boasted 360 pages. Its last issue this week had 90. A frantic search for a deep-pocketed buyer, and then $10 million in financing, proved unavailing.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In these uncertain times, venture capital investors still look with favor on Pasadena, attracted by the "hard science" work at Caltech, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Huntington Medical Research Institute, the nearby City of Hope and other institutions. As a result, Pasadena and neighboring communities are budding hotbeds of new companies pursuing discoveries in biotechnology, optical electronics and computer and material sciences.
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