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Economic Boom

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BUSINESS
February 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
One of the world's poorest countries, Cambodia would seem to offer foreign investors little incentive to reach for their wallets. Decades of war have left its infrastructure in tatters, and its 8 million people make it one of Southeast Asia's tiniest markets. But Cambodia lies at the heart of Southeast Asia, a center of remarkable economic growth. This, together with an investment law hailed as one of the most liberal in the region, has aroused interest from a growing number of corporations.
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BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Shan Li, Adolfo Flores and Ricardo Lopez
On the day the Supreme Court handed two major victories to the gay rights movement, Rossmoor Pastries in Signal Hill put the finishing touches on a wedding cake celebrating gay marriage. The cake - creamy white topped with two same-sex couples kissing - is the first of many that owner Charles Feder anticipates baking as gay weddings resume in the Golden State. He expects gay wedding celebrations, along with future anniversary fetes and baby showers, to be a boon to his business. "When gay marriage was allowed previously in California, we did three or four [cakes]
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BUSINESS
December 25, 1998 | TOM PETRUNO
"The Coming Global Boom." Now there's a magazine headline that hasn't been shouting at you from newsstands lately. And no wonder. Given all that's gone wrong in the world this year--Asia's financial morass, Japan's continuing economic slide, Russia's collapse, global stock markets' late-summer dive--who would climb out on such a seemingly thin limb and predict rampant prosperity ahead?
WORLD
March 18, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When she was 19, Neide Cardeal da Silva left her family, who barely scraped by living off the land, to move in with a family she'd never met. For the next 10 years, she and two other young women worked for Miss Maria Cecilia, keeping the house and family in order. On her one day off a week, she used the apartment's second door, which led directly to the servants' quarters. The worst part about her arrangement, she says, was feeling she was always being watched.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | LEE ROMNEY and STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At an intersection near downtown Compton that only three years ago was marked by vacant lots and prostitutes, the beginnings of a comeback have emerged. Today the corner of Wilmington Avenue and Compton Boulevard is home to a 37-unit condominium complex with a community center and playground. Twenty-eight single-family homes will soon rise from a litter-strewn parcel around the corner. An AutoZone store sprouted last summer.
WORLD
March 18, 2013 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - When she was 19, Neide Cardeal da Silva left her family, who barely scraped by living off the land, to move in with a family she'd never met. For the next 10 years, she and two other young women worked for Miss Maria Cecilia, keeping the house and family in order. On her one day off a week, she used the apartment's second door, which led directly to the servants' quarters. The worst part about her arrangement, she says, was feeling she was always being watched.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2000
Re "Admit It; He's Not Perfect, but He's a Great President," Commentary, Feb 1: If only Robert Scheer had half the grasp of economics as he does of socialism, he would realize that the economic boom we currently enjoy has nothing to do with Bill Clinton. Most economic cycles, especially ones as huge as the United States', take over 10 years to produce results, and given the fact that Clinton was elected in 1992, I would be hard-pressed to believe that he had anything to do with our current prosperity.
MAGAZINE
September 29, 1991
O'Donnell's article was terrific. Having recently been in Argentina to research a book, I believe he captured the current atmosphere. I saw the TV show with Menem and Legrand; the story marvelously recounts its humor and seriousness. The story's final sentence, however, needs underscoring: Argentina deserves hope. Menem and the economic boom may deliver. JOHN FUNK West Covina
OPINION
January 23, 2008
Re "All eyes on U.S. as world markets dive," Jan. 22 Why is everyone so worried about a recession? In the last five years of our economic boom, there has been a troubling rise in the number of people who are extremely self-involved, greedy, ungrateful and who feel a sense of entitlement never before seen in this country. Maybe a recession will bring us back together as Americans and teach us to appreciate what we have. It's worth a try. I say let the receding begin. R.J. Johnson North Hollywood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1998
In his well-written article about President Clinton, Kevin Phillips mentions "the lopsided economic boom that has created the biggest upward redistribution of income since 1929" (Opinion, Aug. 23). I want to thank Phillips for putting into intelligent words something that any clear-thinking, working-class American knows: We are told that the economy is doing great, and we see people around us repeating the slogan like parrots, but we do not see the "greatness" of that economy anywhere.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Doyle McManus
In my Sunday column , I wrote that President Obama, with his permanent campaign promoting the poll-tested proposals in his State of the Union address, was beginning to resemble Bill Clinton. That provoked some angry email from readers who thought I was being too easy on the president -- President Clinton, that is. "Clinton left office with a solid list of accomplishments, high popularity and a healthy economy," I wrote. Several readers asked if I had forgotten the collapse of the "dot-com bubble" in 2000 and the recession that followed in 2001.  "Clinton left behind a collapsing economy -- a recession.
OPINION
February 5, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
Not long after President Obama proclaimed in his second inaugural that "an economic recovery has begun," we learned that the U.S. economy actually shrank in the last quarter. Many economists believe this is a temporary setback. This recovery may be the weakest in American history, but the economy isn't cratering either. Still, you can bet that if the economy continues to contract, Obama will propose the same remedy he always has: more "investments" in education, infrastructure and various industries of the future.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2012 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
WAINWRIGHT, Alaska - It was the down slope of August, and in the icy winds and freezing rain that masquerade as summer on the Arctic coast, Shell Alaska had to move its community barbecue indoors to the school gym. Billed as the oil company's thank-you to the Iñupiat Eskimo village that is about to become a base for offshore drilling operations, the event featured free hamburgers, beans and something rarely seen up in the Far North - plates heaped...
WORLD
May 16, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Africa's rapid economic growth has helped change the stereotype of a hopeless continent of starving people waiting to be rescued, but it has also created an intense need for strong managers, according to a report released Tuesday. Poor management is hurting the effectiveness of global multinational corporations, major local companies, governments and charitable foundations in many African countries, says the report by the African Management Initiative, a nonprofit organization focused on training managers to help business development on the continent.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The nation's busiest seaport complex had its best January since the recession, moving more cargo containers in that month than all but eight other U.S. ports usually move in an entire year. The trade numbers from San Pedro Harbor also showed the increasing importance of exports at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, which rank first and second in the U.S. for container cargo. As recently as five years ago, imports outnumbered exports by more than 3 to 1. But in January, the gap had shrunk to a little more than 2 to 1. There hasn't been a sharp decrease in the U.S. trade deficit, but Los Angeles and Long Beach have done well in luring more customers who ship goods overseas, according to economist Paul Bingham.
WORLD
September 2, 2011 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
Two years ago, Victor Bahia was scraping by on tips from delivering pizzas to UC Berkeley students, living in rough neighborhoods and dodging immigration authorities. These days, he runs his two businesses between frequent trips to the beach here in his hometown and barbecues with his family at a new house in a quiet suburb. But he didn't return because he had realized the dream of many immigrants: earning enough money in the United States to start a new life at home. He gave up on California because he became convinced that booming Brazil offered much more opportunity than the crisis-ridden U.S. And, like many others who have increasingly made the return journey, he found that reality far exceeded his expectations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 2000
Re "Villaraigosa Urges Freezing DMV Fee Cuts to Fund Schools," Jan. 13: I think Assembly Minority Leader Scott Baugh (R-Huntington Beach) is right when he says the Villaraigosa measure is "dead on arrival." What intelligent Republican or Democrat up for reelection (or any antitax assemblyman) would vote to take cash from the pockets of those whose economic boom depends on underfunded schools to turn out low-wage workers to fuel it? SCOTT MAYORAL Los Angeles In 1991 the state raised the automobile license tax to the highest level ever in the history of California.
WORLD
September 23, 2010 | By David Pierson and Megan K. Stack, Los Angeles Times
A dispute between China and Japan over the arrest of a Chinese fishing boat captain shows Beijing's desire to assert itself on the world stage without severely damaging its primary goal of continuing its rapid growth. In the two weeks since the fishing trawler collided with Japanese patrol boats near a group of disputed islands, Beijing has canceled ministerial level contact with Tokyo and Chinese travel agencies have been told to stop offering trips to Japan, a destination for 1.8 million Chinese tourists last year.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
Two old adversaries from the bitter 2008 Democratic presidential race reconnected Wednesday at the White House in a fragile partnership that could unite two strands of the party and possibly strengthen its prospects in a bleak midterm campaign season. President Obama welcomed former President Clinton for a talk about job creation — an issue that was the 42nd president's strong suit but may be the 44th president's political undoing. With voters unnerved about unemployment, Obama has been wrapping himself in a Clinton era linked in the public mind to flush economic times.
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