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Economic Discrimination

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March 1, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court refused Thursday to extend the state civil rights act to bar discrimination against the poor, ruling that landlords may deny rentals to people who fail to meet minimum-income standards. The decision came in the first major review of the act by the conservative high court and marked an abrupt departure from past decisions granting broad protections even against forms of bias not specifically covered by the law.
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NEWS
June 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Immigration groups complained Thursday that the government is giving the rich and famous special treatment under a new program that will allow foreign celebrities, athletes and executives to get their working visas in 15 days for a $1,000 payment. The visa application process takes three months for most foreigners. "This basically says, 'If you have money, we'll let you into our country as soon as we can.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2000 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The burned-out cafeteria and auditorium at Russell Elementary School in South Los Angeles is surrounded by piles of dirt, mounds of broken asphalt and large chunks of concrete. Sometimes men show up to work on the charred building. Sometimes it sits abandoned. For more than two years, the cafeteria manager has had no cafeteria to manage. No big ovens. No counters. There has been no stage for school plays, no hall large enough for assemblies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1997 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Legislature's black caucus vowed Wednesday to block a state loan for the downtown Los Angeles-to-Pasadena light-rail line unless the Metropolitan Transportation Authority makes a "real financial commitment" to improve transit service in the county's African American community. A letter sent to MTA board Chairman Larry Zarian and signed by seven black legislators calls the MTA's recently adopted rail recovery plan "nothing short of environmental and economic discrimination."
BUSINESS
September 21, 1995 | PATRICK LEE and JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Los Angeles County drivers continue to pay the highest auto insurance premiums in the state, and Orange County motorists rank third, according to a state survey of insurance rates released Wednesday by the Department of Insurance. Los Angeles-area drivers pay more than twice as much as most Northern California residents for the same insurance, according to the survey of the 14 largest auto insurers that control 82% of the state market.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN
"My concern is the air," says Juana Beatriz Gutierrez. In East Los Angeles, where she lives, "there is more and more pollution, especially in September and October. Your eyes ache and you have, like a cold, only it's not a cold," she says. Gutierrez, 59 and the mother of nine, has just won a battle to protect the air in her neighborhood--already polluted by traffic from five freeways, body shops, food-processing plants and factories.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1993 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying she wants to "send a message" to all lenders, U.S. Atty. Gen. Janet Reno on Monday announced a settlement of nearly $1 million with Shawmut National Corp., accused of discriminating against black and Latino applicants for home mortgages. "Don't wait for the Justice Department to come knocking," Reno said at a news conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | MATHIS WINKLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Kelly used to think of himself as a good Catholic. He dutifully attended Sunday Mass and regularly opened his checkbook to charities. He was a good fit for his Orange County community. But some of the social teachings of the church, which condemn unfettered capitalism and promote international peace, rubbed Kelly--an engineer who worked in the weapons industry--the wrong way. He simply did not believe in pacifism.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1993 | From Reuters
Racial disparity in home mortgage lending has scarcely changed since 1990, despite a two-year campaign by bankers and the government to wipe out loan discrimination, a study released Tuesday shows. The Clinton Administration, meanwhile, announced a program designed to pump more than $34 billion worth of mortgages into inner cities and to low-income people through 1994.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1999
A heated debate Wednesday over federal job training funds turned into an argument between City Council members from the San Fernando Valley and the Central City over who has the poorest constituents. Councilman Alex Padilla of Pacoima jousted verbally with Councilman Mike Hernandez after Padilla complained that his Valley district is being shortchanged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1999 | KAREN ALEXANDER and MATHIS WINKLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Someday, every high school classroom might resemble Room 304 at Villa Park High. Students enter their morning English class, pop open their laptop computers, plug them into the portals at their desks and browse the Internet to find potential topics for research projects. They e-mail their homework to 11th-grade English teacher Connie Bohnert, who has posted her assignments and lecture notes on the class' animated Web page.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1999 | MATHIS WINKLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Kelly used to think of himself as a good Catholic. He dutifully attended Sunday Mass and regularly opened his checkbook to charities. He was a good fit for his Orange County community. But some of the social teachings of the church, which condemn unfettered capitalism and promote international peace, rubbed Kelly--an engineer who worked in the weapons industry--the wrong way. He simply did not believe in pacifism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1999 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At $12 per unit, California community colleges offer the nation's cheapest college education--one that is expected to get even cheaper with the Legislature's passage of a proposal to reduce fees for the second year in a row. But although low fees are popular with students and lawmakers, they are criticized by some policy experts who say that contrary to intent, California's rock-bottom community college prices work against the interests of low-income students.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1999 | LIZ PULLIAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Insurance data released Friday by state regulators show what consumer advocates have long contended: that insurance companies write far fewer auto, homeowners and small-business policies in low-income, predominantly minority areas.
NEWS
March 9, 1999 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sweeping decision with far-reaching implications for mass transit throughout the Los Angeles area, a court-appointed special master Monday ordered the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to buy 532 new natural gas-powered buses and to hire additional drivers and mechanics to relieve the chronic overcrowding plaguing the nation's second-largest bus system. The 62-page ruling by Special Master Donald T.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1995
One of the nation's top Latino civil rights organizations has joined a federal lawsuit alleging that the Long Beach Freeway extension discriminates against Latinos in El Sereno. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund has joined a suit by a coalition of El Sereno community groups against Caltrans in September, charging that millions of dollars to be spent to minimize the 6.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The global push toward a "borderless economy," already blamed for the turmoil that has impoverished millions from Seoul to Sao Paulo, is increasingly accused of another sin: undermining the sovereignty of governments. Sweeping free-trade initiatives of the 1990s, such as NAFTA and the World Trade Organization, are coming under attack for handing foreign interests the legal firepower to undercut public policy on economic, health, safety and other issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1999
Calling the Pasadena light-rail line's construction racist and illegal, more than 50 protesters Wednesday night halted a meeting of the line's new governing authority before police broke up the demonstration and arrested six people. More than a dozen Pasadena police officers took the leaders of Bus Riders Union, a passenger rights group, away in handcuffs after members, chanting and banging drums and tambourines, forced the Pasadena Blue Line Construction Authority to adjourn for 20 minutes.
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