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NEWS
July 2, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A prosecutor recommended that a sheep farmer who has waged a high-profile battle against globalization receive a 10-month jail sentence, with nine months suspended, for vandalizing a McDonald's restaurant in the southern French town of Millau. Jose Bove was on trial in Millau with nine other defendants who attacked the restaurant last August during a wave of protests targeting the fast-food chain as a symbol of U.S. trade "hegemony" and economic globalization.
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BUSINESS
August 17, 2011 | By Benjamin Haas
Entering the campus of the largest animation production facility in China, visitors are greeted by life-size statues of Disney and Pixar characters: Belle dancing with the Beast, Mowgli and Baloo sitting on a tree trunk and Buzz and Woody in a classic buddy pose. But this isn't an overseas outpost of the American studios. Instead, these knockoff statues are meant to inspire a new generation of Chinese animators to make films that can compete with Hollywood blockbusters and classics such as "Beauty and the Beast," "The Jungle Book" and "Toy Story.
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OPINION
June 27, 1999 | ZEPHIRIN DIABRE, Zephirin Diabre is associate administrator of the United Nations Development Program
The formerly obscure province of Kosovo is now etched in the public's mind. So is Bosnia. As are Rwanda, Iraq and Iran. All have received extraordinary attention in the international community, and for good reason. Strife, both internal and external, attracts diplomatic and media attention. Conflict generates news. Peaceful progress does not. The fact that nations such as Mongolia or Mali or Malawi have not received such recognition should surprise no one.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke on Friday cautioned U.S. lawmakers to avoid the temptation to impose protectionist trade policies in reaction to fierce international competition. Globalization has made countries increasingly connected economically, Bernanke told a conference that explored the forces of globalization. The opportunities for companies to sell their goods to more countries can generate wealth and boost living standards, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1999 | NADINE GORDIMER, Nadine Gordimer, goodwill ambassador to the U.N. Development Program, was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature in 1991. This was excerpted from an address delivered Tuesday to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland
What role can globalization play in eradicating world poverty, for poverty puts an inhuman, outcast mask on more than 3 billion of our world population? There is no question that we have the resources and the technology to achieve solutions to the problem of our co-existence on one planet, as was confirmed in a declaration, "The Eradication of Poverty," of the United Nations General Assembly in 1997. Overwhelmingly, inequality lies on the axis North-South of our maps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1998 | ROSABETH M. KANTER, Rosabeth Moss Kanter is a Harvard Business School professor and author of "World Class: Thriving Locally in the Global Economy" (Simon & Schuster, 1997) and "Frontiers of Management" (Harvard Business School Press, 1997)
The global economy's vulnerabilities are apparent: economic interdependence without international political influence, open markets without political stability or legal-regulatory infrastructure, economic transitions without social safety nets. Uncertainties and crises in international markets affect American interests--the "Asian flu" that finally infected the U.S. stock market, Russia's currency and leadership problems, Japan's recession--but U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1998 | GEORGE T. CRANE, George T. Crane is an associate professor of political science at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass
Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad is defying the global economy. On Tuesday, his government announced that it was imposing capital controls and establishing a fixed exchange rate for the national currency, the ringgit. He then fired his deputy prime minister, Anwar Ibrahim, a leading Malaysian liberal. In taking these actions, Mahathir has boldly rejected the course that other crisis-torn Asian countries have followed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1999 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate's columns run Wednesdays. He teaches at UCLA. E-mail: tplate@ucla.edu
There's more than one way to survive a crisis. It was about a year ago that two Southeast Asian economies ignored the West's advice, introduced strikingly unorthodox measures to protect their fast-weakening currencies and roiling economies and triggered a transpacific diplomatic storm. The West, especially America, howled, as if some holy Adam Smith commandment had been violated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1999 | TOM PLATE, Times contributing editor Tom Plate's column runs Tuesdays. He teaches at UCLA. E-mail: tplate@ucla.edu
There's no shortage of fear, loathing and even hysteria about economic globalization these days. That's especially true in academe; many who toil there believe its hurricane force will in the end leave the world's poor twisting in the wind. Some academicians flatly view globalization as an ethical and moral menace. University of Exeter Prof. Timothy Gorringe, in his new book "Fair Shares: Ethics and the Global Economy," says globalization has "the potential for destroying society."
OPINION
November 28, 1999 | Martin A. Lee, Martin A. Lee is the author of "The Beast Reawakens," a book about neo-fascism
Austria's far-right Freedom Party sent shock waves through Europe when it won 27% of the vote in recent national elections. Joerg Haider, the Freedom Party's youthful, charismatic fuehrer, is now in a strong position to contend for the Austrian chancellorship, despite his penchant for expressing pro-Nazi sympathies.
AUTOS
March 9, 2005 | DAN NEIL
Cadillacs built in Sweden and sold in Bavaria. Chevrolets built in Korea and sold in Romania. The big bruiser Chrysler 300C built in Austria and sold wherever asphalt needs a good spanking. Never mind the 200-mph Bugattis and stretch Rolls-Royces. The story of the 2005 centennial Geneva Auto Show (through Sunday) is one of vast global alliance-building as car companies go lean, cut development costs and reach out to new markets.
SPORTS
June 15, 2004 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
Chiara Zanini of Milan, Italy, one of 160 media representatives from outside the United States assigned to cover the NBA Finals, unabashedly admits that before she became a journalist, she hung posters of NBA stars on her bedroom walls. "You are the perennial showtime to us," she said last week.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2004 | Don Lee, Times Staff Writer
The last time Roxanne Musser saw road work here was back in the mid-1990s, when the company that owns this copper mining town paved one dusty street after another, only to stop abruptly when the metal's price tumbled. So the 34-year-old homemaker knew exactly what it meant when construction crews appeared a few weeks ago on her corner and painted road signs and repaired the street.
BUSINESS
October 6, 2003 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
The stock market this year has proved again that a wall of worry is made for climbing. The surge in share prices that continued through the third quarter has defied skeptics who said that stocks had no good reason to rebound and plenty of better reasons to stay in the dumps. Instead, as Wall Street nears the one-year anniversary of the long bear market's apparent demise, the bulls seem very much in control.
NEWS
February 3, 2002 | WILLIAM ORME, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At one end of the dais was Uncle Sam's chief financial representative, a man seen by some at this year's World Economic Forum as Uncle Scrooge: Paul H. O'Neill, an unapologetic opponent of increased aid from the world's wealthiest nation to the world's poorest nations.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of 34 Western Hemisphere nations left their beleaguered enclave here Sunday, declaring in the face of three days of protests their commitment to free trade and "to making this the century of the Americas." "We do not fear globalization, nor are we blinded by its allure," they said in a document published at the conclusion of the third Summit of the Americas. They promised to create a hemisphere in which "no one is left behind."
BUSINESS
February 26, 2001 | Reuters
Mexico's Caribbean resort of Cancun is the venue for the next round in the ongoing battle about the globalization of the world economy that has sparked street brawls and high-level debates from Seattle to Prague, Czech Republic. The World Economic Forum, known for its annual meeting drawing business leaders, presidents and protesters to the Swiss ski town Davos, this week heads to Cancun for two days of talks on the prospects for Latin America's second-largest economy.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A French appeals court upheld a radical farmer's three-month prison sentence for ransacking a McDonald's to protest unchecked globalization. Jose Bove, a 47-year-old sheep farmer, has become a symbol of anti-globalization activists in France and abroad since he led an attack on a McDonald's restaurant under construction in the southern town of Millau in August 1999.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2001 | Reuters
Mexico's Caribbean resort of Cancun is the venue for the next round in the ongoing battle about the globalization of the world economy that has sparked street brawls and high-level debates from Seattle to Prague, Czech Republic. The World Economic Forum, known for its annual meeting drawing business leaders, presidents and protesters to the Swiss ski town Davos, this week heads to Cancun for two days of talks on the prospects for Latin America's second-largest economy.
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