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Economic Policy

OPINION
July 31, 1994 | James A. Baker III, James A. Baker III was the 61st secretary of state and also served as Treasury secretary
Eighteen months and two G-7 Summits into his Administration, President Bill Clinton has yet to implement a strategy of trade, investment and exchange-rate policies that ef fectively promote U.S. interests in the international economic arena. Instead, the Administration's international economic policies seem confused, even schizophrenic. Its uncertain signals seem to reflect a mixed mind about the value of free trade and investment.
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NEWS
June 27, 1987 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
Arthur F. Burns, a former Federal Reserve Board chairman, ambassador to West Germany and close economic adviser to Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower and Richard M. Nixon, died Friday in Baltimore of complications from heart surgery. He was 83. Burns was a Washington institution, a conservative but pragmatic economist whose forceful personality and strong intellect influenced economic policy from the early 1950s through his eight-year tenure at the helm of the nation's central bank.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1988 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. government should urge international lenders to restructure Mexico's payments on its $102-billion foreign debt and to peg them to the country's economic growth, a commission of American and Mexican policy experts has said after a two-year study of bilateral relations. The report, timed to coincide with new administrations in both countries, warns that the debt issue threatens to undermine U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1991
Washington let a lot of programs come unraveled during the happy-go-lucky days of the 1980s when it was trying to cut government down to size. Among the serious areas of neglect are the very programs designed to measure the unraveling so that something can be done about it. A recent report in National Journal says that, bad as it was, the 1990 census may not be the most important statistical program damaged by deep 1980s staff and budget cuts.
NEWS
March 24, 1992 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Standing outside a shipyard that manufactures the endangered Seawolf submarine, Democratic front-runner Bill Clinton accused President Bush on Monday of advocating a "do nothing" policy on the economy. One day before the Connecticut primary, Clinton triumphantly held aloft a Boston Globe story on Bush's remarks to members of Congress after his recent veto of a Democratic economic package. " 'Do nothing' on economy, Bush advises lawmakers," the Globe headline read.
NEWS
July 5, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union's new, independent-minded legislature for the first time Tuesday voted to boot a deputy premier out of his job, despite a last-minute change in rules aimed at pushing through the Kremlin's choice to steer foreign economic policy. The vote served as proof, if the Soviet leadership needed it, that political maneuvering may not be enough to get an appointee through the current Supreme Soviet.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1996 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Thursday made an impassioned call for a new debate on how fast the economy should be allowed to grow, in remarks that seemed to challenge the cautious economic doctrine of Alan Greenspan, the Federal Reserve Board chairman Clinton is expected to renominate soon. In a speech at a Democratic fund-raiser, Clinton declared that he is not convinced of the view--widely associated with Greenspan--that growth must be held to a moderate rate to keep the economy on course.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1995 | JORGE G. CASTANEDA, Jorge G. Castaneda is a graduate professor of political science at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. and
Before the Mexican meltdown became irreversible, the Clinton Administration finally woke up to the gravity of the crisis and stepped in to prop up the sinking peso, the embattled government of President Ernesto Zedillo and plummeting confidence in the country's stability. It may turn out that this latest, mammoth Mexican rescue package (to the tune of up to $40 billion, a sum that by itself describes the magnitude of the crisis) will suffice to restore stability to Mexican markets.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the United States plunges into war against Iraq, top economic policy-makers may take a series of steps to minimize the impact of the war on the domestic economy, while seeking to ensure adequate supplies of energy, government and private analysts said Monday. While it has not been publicly announced, the Bush Administration's first action on the economic front, officials say, would be the quick release of 1.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | MICHAEL ROSS and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Alice Rivlin stepped up to the podium last December to accept her appointment as deputy director of the Office of Management and Budget, the television cameras saw nothing but the thicket of microphones that towered over the diminutive economist's head.
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