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Economic Reform Russia

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BUSINESS
July 5, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this placid Volga River city known as Russia's Detroit, the giant Avtovaz car works is lurching into gear after a five-year breakdown to seize what is becoming the ultimate captive market. Sleek Saabs, Mercedeses, Volvos and BMWs have been the status symbols of choice among newly rich mobsters and moguls. But ordinary Russians, who make up the fastest-growing pool of potential buyers in Europe, are increasingly compelled to shop at home.
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NEWS
May 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin brashly promised Thursday that "Russia's financial market will not collapse" and vowed to protect the ruble from devaluation and a new spiral of rising prices. After summoning the country's key economic strategists to an emergency Kremlin meeting, Yeltsin sought to assure worried Russians that the chief success of his nearly seven years in the presidency--a stable ruble with inflation under control--will not be lost because of government overspending.
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NEWS
January 16, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two days of meetings with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, senior U.S. officials left Moscow on Saturday unshaken in their conviction that Yeltsin will press ahead with economic reform and said President Clinton will ask for nearly $1 billion in Russian aid when he unveils his 1995 budget next month. At the same time, officials said there would be no sharp shifts in the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this placid Volga River city known as Russia's Detroit, the giant Avtovaz car works is lurching into gear after a five-year breakdown to seize what is becoming the ultimate captive market. Sleek Saabs, Mercedeses, Volvos and BMWs have been the status symbols of choice among newly rich mobsters and moguls. But ordinary Russians, who make up the fastest-growing pool of potential buyers in Europe, are increasingly compelled to shop at home.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin pledged that his struggling nation would make no retreat from its difficult course of economic reform, delighted U.S. officials said Thursday, as President Clinton and the Russian leader completed the first round of their two-day Moscow summit.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday accepted the resignation of Yegor T. Gaidar, the architect of Russia's Western-financed market reforms, and the government's other top reformer said he was being demoted and may also quit. The eclipse of Gaidar and Boris G. Fyodorov, leading advocates of a radical shakeout of Russia's heavily subsidized industry and collective farms, foreshadowed a Cabinet reshuffle that could be announced as early as today.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin took over most of the Soviet Union's gold and diamond mining on Friday to help finance a program of radical economic reforms, then suspended oil exports to ensure enough fuel for the winter.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yegor T. Gaidar, the brain behind Russia's economic reforms, announced Sunday that he is quitting the government, citing the tremendous frustration of being blamed for decisions that he could not control. "I cannot serve in the government and at the same time be in opposition to it," Gaidar said in a letter to President Boris N. Yeltsin. "I cannot be responsible for reforms without having . . . the necessary levers to carry out the economic policy in which I believe."
NEWS
May 29, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin brashly promised Thursday that "Russia's financial market will not collapse" and vowed to protect the ruble from devaluation and a new spiral of rising prices. After summoning the country's key economic strategists to an emergency Kremlin meeting, Yeltsin sought to assure worried Russians that the chief success of his nearly seven years in the presidency--a stable ruble with inflation under control--will not be lost because of government overspending.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | From Reuters
Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader who dramatically loosened restrictions on Jewish emigration, met U.S. Jewish leaders Tuesday and urged them to be vigorous in supporting democracy and economic reform in Russia. One Jewish leader, who attended the one-hour private session at the former Soviet president's hotel, quoted him as saying: "Anti-Semitism is not deeply rooted in Russia but it could be more of a problem in the Central Asian Republics. We must watch the situation carefully.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Monday accepted the resignation of Yegor T. Gaidar, the architect of Russia's Western-financed market reforms, and the government's other top reformer said he was being demoted and may also quit. The eclipse of Gaidar and Boris G. Fyodorov, leading advocates of a radical shakeout of Russia's heavily subsidized industry and collective farms, foreshadowed a Cabinet reshuffle that could be announced as early as today.
NEWS
January 17, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yegor T. Gaidar, the brain behind Russia's economic reforms, announced Sunday that he is quitting the government, citing the tremendous frustration of being blamed for decisions that he could not control. "I cannot serve in the government and at the same time be in opposition to it," Gaidar said in a letter to President Boris N. Yeltsin. "I cannot be responsible for reforms without having . . . the necessary levers to carry out the economic policy in which I believe."
NEWS
January 16, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two days of meetings with Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin, senior U.S. officials left Moscow on Saturday unshaken in their conviction that Yeltsin will press ahead with economic reform and said President Clinton will ask for nearly $1 billion in Russian aid when he unveils his 1995 budget next month. At the same time, officials said there would be no sharp shifts in the U.S.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin pledged that his struggling nation would make no retreat from its difficult course of economic reform, delighted U.S. officials said Thursday, as President Clinton and the Russian leader completed the first round of their two-day Moscow summit.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian Federation President Boris N. Yeltsin took over most of the Soviet Union's gold and diamond mining on Friday to help finance a program of radical economic reforms, then suspended oil exports to ensure enough fuel for the winter.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
Here are the key economic events scheduled for the week. Monday: * New York Stock Exchange's new board of directors meets for the first time. * Consumer Federation of America releases its annual survey of worst consumer scams. * Federal rules take effect allowing consumers to take existing phone numbers with them when they switch wireless carriers. Tuesday: * Commerce Department reports on gross domestic product, third quarter, preliminary. * National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997
The summit meeting scheduled for March between President Clinton and Russian President Boris Yeltsin looks increasingly iffy. This week Yeltsin was forced to cancel a visit to The Hague because of continuing poor health following heart bypass surgery last November and a subsequent bout of double pneumonia. The Kremlin says he still plans to meet next Sunday with French President Jacques Chirac.
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