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Economic Revival

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BUSINESS
December 8, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
No Economic Recovery Seen for Russia in '95: Economic prospects for Russia are gloomy, with little chance of any recovery in production, employment and living standards in the next year, according to a United Nations report. The report by the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe said the forecast for other former Soviet states was even worse, but that economic revival in most East European countries would continue. The U.N.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2011 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
During El Salvador's civil war in the 1980s, this town was at the heart of a perilous battle zone, washed over by government soldiers one day, leftist guerrillas the next. The upheaval made Suchitoto an unhappy emblem of the conflict and heightened its isolation in the countryside, where economic progress has been elusive. The war is long over, but not the languor. Yet a project is afoot to invigorate Suchitoto, pushed by an unlikely crowd: theater aficionados. These boosters see theater as a spark for growth and desperately needed jobs — altering the face of their town with a little more "Our Town.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 2003
Well, here we go again. The U.S.A., a.k.a. Unlimited Suckers Associated, is called upon to send more money, along with our lifestyle that creates this money, to bail out the failed economies of the Middle East ("Job Growth an Antidote to Mideast Violence," Jan 26). Why are these countries, the cradle of civilization, commerce and trade, bankrupt? They are ruled by corrupt, venal elites who hog 95% of the oil wealth for themselves, leaving their people in poverty. Then they blame the U.S. and Israel for the misery of their people.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2009 | Don Lee and David Pierson
On the eve of his first Pacific trip since entering the White House, President Obama signaled Thursday that he would press Asian leaders to open up their markets and boost purchases of U.S. goods instead of relentlessly focusing on exporting more and more to American consumers. In remarks made before leaving Washington on the seven-day, four-nation trip, the president suggested that Asia must do more to "rebalance" the global economy by accepting more U.S. imports, increasing its own domestic consumption and relying less on Americans as buyers of last resort.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2009 | David Cho and Binyamin Appelbaum, Cho and Appelbaum write for the Washington Post.
The Obama administration still plans to spend tens of billions of dollars reviving the nation's financial system, even after the government's unexpected finding that major banks need only a little bit more direct government aid. Despite signs that the worst of the recession may be over, senior officials say they think big actions are necessary to spark an economic revival. Some government officials say they now expect healthy banks to return more than $35 billion in the near future.
OPINION
March 15, 2003
Re "U.S. Helps Others to Help Itself," by Scott B. Lasensky, Commentary, March 6: Egypt receives $1.8 billion in U.S. aid, and the economic aid is being reduced by half over a 10-year period. This is 25 cents per capita, putting Egypt in a substantially lower category compared with many other recipients of U.S. aid. Lasensky states that Egypt has not witnessed any significant political, economic and social reforms. Since the 1970s, 14 political parties have been established, with more than 45 newspapers affiliated with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1997
Donald Kirk's assertion ("Economic Stress Makes the Heart Grow Fonder of Authoritarianism," Opinion, Nov. 30) that Korea needs and wants the authoritarianism of yesteryear proves to be a reductive approach at forecasting the future governing process of the Republic of Korea. Kirk expresses, while simultaneously casting an ironic overtone, a yearning for more authoritarian ways and he seems to think that this is our only chance for economic revival. Furthermore, by making light of our democratization process, calling it an "overlay of an old system," he presumes that since we are not "perfect" now, we never will be. He says, "There is always the risk, as the economy worsens .J.J.
NEWS
February 4, 1989 | From United Press International
Recovering from eight years of fighting, Iran will devote the second decade of its Islamic revolution to rebuilding the war-devastated nation, Parliament Speaker Hashemi Rafsanjani said Friday. Addressing tens of thousands of worshipers at Tehran University, Rafsanjani said the next decade of the fundamentalist-led Islamic revolution will be "the decade of construction and economic independence."
OPINION
February 13, 1994
The "go slow" approach toward the Alameda Corridor which Jerry Epstein wrote about in your paper ("A Yellow Light on Alameda Corridor Deal," Commentary, Feb. 3) shows exactly why the most critical transportation project in California is still on hold. As a member of the state Transportation Commission, Epstein criticized the path which negotiators followed on the price and terms for the corridor. He argued that Southern Pacific got too much money and that California should have just seized the Alameda Corridor under eminent domain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1989 | THOMAS B. GOLD, Thomas B. Gold is an associate professor of sociology at UC Berkeley and a national fellow at the Hoover Institution. and
The ascension of Shanghai's Jiang Zemin to the hot seat of Chinese politics represents a victory for advocates of the theory of "neo-authoritarianism." Writing in various journals last winter, these theorists argued for the application to China of what they saw was the key to successful economic development in East Asia's "Four Dragons"--Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore and Hong Kong. In their view, the secret was a strong leader aided by dedicated advisers who could overcome all obstacles to push the economy forward.
BUSINESS
May 9, 2009 | David Cho and Binyamin Appelbaum, Cho and Appelbaum write for the Washington Post.
The Obama administration still plans to spend tens of billions of dollars reviving the nation's financial system, even after the government's unexpected finding that major banks need only a little bit more direct government aid. Despite signs that the worst of the recession may be over, senior officials say they think big actions are necessary to spark an economic revival. Some government officials say they now expect healthy banks to return more than $35 billion in the near future.
NATIONAL
December 3, 2008 | Christi Parsons, Parsons is a writer in our Washington bureau.
The nation's governors came to tell tales of financial woe, but President-elect Barack Obama was already sold on them playing a role in the national economic recovery plan. After convening almost a complete set of state chief executives Tuesday, Obama pledged "action, and action now" to address the budget shortfalls expected in no less than 41 states in the coming year.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Services
Broad market indexes of U.S. stocks had their biggest rally in six weeks Thursday after new data indicated slowing economic activity while worker productivity remained strong. The reports gave some investors the courage to buy ahead of today's report on May employment. A pullback in oil prices also helped lift sentiment. The Standard & Poor's 500 index jumped 15.62 points, or 1.2%, to 1,285.71, its best one-day gain since April 18. The Nasdaq composite index, which rallied 40.98 points, or 1.
OPINION
March 15, 2003
Re "U.S. Helps Others to Help Itself," by Scott B. Lasensky, Commentary, March 6: Egypt receives $1.8 billion in U.S. aid, and the economic aid is being reduced by half over a 10-year period. This is 25 cents per capita, putting Egypt in a substantially lower category compared with many other recipients of U.S. aid. Lasensky states that Egypt has not witnessed any significant political, economic and social reforms. Since the 1970s, 14 political parties have been established, with more than 45 newspapers affiliated with them.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2003
Well, here we go again. The U.S.A., a.k.a. Unlimited Suckers Associated, is called upon to send more money, along with our lifestyle that creates this money, to bail out the failed economies of the Middle East ("Job Growth an Antidote to Mideast Violence," Jan 26). Why are these countries, the cradle of civilization, commerce and trade, bankrupt? They are ruled by corrupt, venal elites who hog 95% of the oil wealth for themselves, leaving their people in poverty. Then they blame the U.S. and Israel for the misery of their people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawrence Koonce, like a lot of his neighbors near Vermont and Manchester avenues in South Los Angeles, stands up for his part of L.A. But sometimes what he hears really hurts--as when relatives in New Jersey recently told him they wouldn't come for a family reunion. "They tell me, 'Go down there? You're going to be carjacked,' " the 33-year resident of the Vermont Knolls area recalled. "There's pride in my voice when I tell people, 'This is a good area to live.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000
Hoping to revitalize a community plagued by blight and crime, a coalition of Latino organizations has announced the formation of a community economic development corporation for the Pico-Union/Westlake area. The corporation, created by groups that include El Rescate, a nonprofit legal aid firm, and Casa de La Cultura of El Salvador, a nonprofit cultural center, will work to create low-income housing projects, education and health programs, and efforts to bolster the business climate in the area.
NEWS
February 23, 1994 | MARTIN FORSTENZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When this dusty western Nevada town realized that it could no longer depend on a nearby Army ammunition plant and a sagging mining industry to drive its economy, it turned to its one natural attraction--Walker Lake, a few miles north. For decades the 70-square-mile lake has attracted anglers from throughout Nevada, California and other states to fish for its prized Lahontan strain of cutthroat trout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000
Hoping to revitalize a community plagued by blight and crime, a coalition of Latino organizations has announced the formation of a community economic development corporation for the Pico-Union/Westlake area. The corporation, created by groups that include El Rescate, a nonprofit legal aid firm, and Casa de La Cultura of El Salvador, a nonprofit cultural center, will work to create low-income housing projects, education and health programs, and efforts to bolster the business climate in the area.
NEWS
November 16, 1998 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents of Japan's southernmost island, Okinawa, the linchpin of the U.S. military presence in Asia, narrowly voted out the longtime incumbent governor Sunday after he had vigorously opposed U.S. bases there and elected in his place a businessman who may be more conciliatory to American interests. Keiichi Inamine, 65, who had focused his campaign on reviving the economy, squeaked by Gov. Masahide Ota, 73, whose main platform was ousting the U.S. bases. The vote was 374,833 to 337,369.
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