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Economic Sanctions

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993
The last decade of the 20th Century is witnessing an upsurge of economic warfare passing under the euphemism of "sanctions." With a greater and more diversified interdependence within the world community, this kind of war has become more effective and deadlier than ever before. Since the only victims of sanctions are civilians, the omnipotent gods of the public opinion, the media, are used to justify the reasons and obscure the real aim, which is to destroy the enemy. The glaring example of this "new world order" policy are the U.N. sanctions implemented against Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro)
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WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON -- President Obama says Russia is not yet holding up its si de of an agreement to de -escalate tension in Ukraine, and he suggested that the U.S. and its allies are prepared to hit Moscow with additional sanctions in coming days.   “So far at least, we've seen them not abi de by the spirit or the letter of the agreement in Geneva,” Obama told reporters at a news conference in Tokyo on Thursday, the first full day of a four-country tour through Asia.
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WORLD
October 4, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Russia rejected U.S. and European Union calls to lift economic sanctions on Georgia, saying it had cut transportation links to curb a military buildup by its pro-Western neighbor. Russia halted rail, air and postal connections with the former Soviet republic in response to the arrest of four Russian military officers on spying charges. The four were released Monday. Russian Foreign Minister Sergei V.
OPINION
March 23, 2014 | Doyle McManus
Here's what the United States has done so far in an attempt to deter further Russian incursions into Ukraine: applied two rounds of economic sanctions and asked Congress to approve $1 billion in loan guarantees for Kiev. Here's what President Obama says he won't do: "We are not going to be getting into a military excursion in Ukraine," he told a television station in San Diego last week. PHOTOS: A peek inside 5 doomed dictators' opulent lifestyles The president's careful response and unwillingness to consider military intervention has met with general support from other Democrats.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
President Clinton, responding to positive developments in Yugoslavia, notified congressional leaders Friday that he was lifting trade and financial sanctions against the Balkan nation. The easing of sanctions does not apply to former President Slobodan Milosevic, his family, his cronies or indicted war crimes suspects. All told, 81 people will remain under sanctions restrictions.
NEWS
August 25, 1985 | From Reuters
Economic sanctions to force nations to change policies, like those the United States may impose on South Africa, more often fail than succeed, according to a study by an independent research institute. The Washington-based Institute for International Economics reviewed 103 instances of sanctions since World War I and found that 55% failed to achieve their goals. After 1973, almost two-thirds failed to force even modest policy changes, it said in a new book.
NEWS
April 10, 1988 | United Press International
President Reagan imposed harsher economic sanctions against Panama Friday, shutting off the flow of U.S. dollars to the Central American nation in an effort to force Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega out of power. Reagan, in a statement, announced that he had invoked the International Emergency Economic Powers Act to increase economic pressure on Noriega, who is under indictment in the United States for drug trafficking.
NEWS
February 7, 1987 | ROBERT W. GIBSON, Times International Economics Correspondent and
Ever since the Boston Tea Party, Americans have tried to force change on distant governments by turning the economic screw. Thomas Jefferson called it "peaceful coercion." The modern term is economic sanctions. Even before South Africa joined the target list, the United States had more sanctions in place against more governments than any other nation in the world. Now, however, the value of economic sanctions is being challenged.
NEWS
April 17, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Raising the threat of a new crisis with the United Nations, Iraq demanded Thursday that the Security Council lift economic sanctions when it meets later this month to review the status of Baghdad's weapons programs. But U.N. officials said there is little chance that the council will lift the sanctions when it meets, possibly the week of April 27. The U.N.
NEWS
February 21, 1987 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Britain joined Friday in vetoing a Security Council proposal that would have imposed sweeping U.N. economic sanctions against South Africa. West Germany cast the only other negative vote as the 15-nation council ended two days of debate on a draft resolution submitted by five nonaligned nations. France and Japan abstained, and the 10 other members voted in favor. U.S. Ambassador Herbert S. Okun announced the U.S.
WORLD
March 13, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
Russian President Vladimir Putin said Thursday that his country wasn't responsible for the turmoil in Crimea, describing Sunday's vote on whether the strategic peninsula should secede from Ukraine as a crisis of a purely "domestic nature. " Western nations nonetheless stepped up the pressure on Putin to defuse the explosive conflict or face punishing economic sanctions. The most serious note of caution, though, came from the Russian stock market, where share values fell Thursday to their lowest level in nearly four years and the ruble continued its nosedive against the dollar and euro.
OPINION
March 2, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Secretary of State John F. Kerry is right: Russia's deployment of troops in Crimea is an "incredible act of aggression" that violates express promises Russia made two decades ago to respect Ukraine's territorial integrity. If Russia doesn't reverse course, the United States and countries in Europe should impose economic sanctions. But even as they weigh such measures, the United States and its allies must be willing to show Russia that its concerns can be resolved, in Kerry's words, "according to the standards of the 21st century.
WORLD
February 2, 2014 | By David Willman, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Hillary Rodham Clinton is backing President Obama's opposition to new economic sanctions against Iran. Obama announced in his State of the Union address last week that he would veto any legislation that called for such sanctions, as negotiations to extend an interim nuclear weapons agreement proceed. Some prominent Republicans support new sanctions. Clinton, the former secretary of State and presumed early frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, detailed her position in a Jan. 26 letter to the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Democrat Carl Levin of Michigan.
WORLD
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - His greatest impact was as a moral leader, but Nelson Mandela also left a legacy in diplomacy by helping popularize the use of international sanctions to pressure a government to change its policies. Since sanctions were imposed in an effort to end apartheid and bring down South Africa's white-minority government, they have been used hundreds of times, especially by Western countries. President Clinton, who ordered sanctions against Cuba, Libya, Iran and Pakistan, mused near the end of his second term that the United States had become "sanctions-happy.
OPINION
November 8, 2013
Re "The answer on Iran? Yes.," Opinion, Nov. 6 Doyle McManus is right that we should be willing to take "yes" for an answer when it comes to negotiating with Iran. Members of Congress such as Sens. Mark Steven Kirk (R-Ill.) and Robert Menendez (D-N.J.) who advocate more sanctions must face the real choice they are foisting on the American public: If they push through unnecessary, punitive policies that could torpedo talks with Iran, they are saying yes to another military intervention.
WORLD
November 7, 2013 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - Iran and six world powers appeared to close in on a preliminary agreement in Geneva on Thursday that would begin to limit Tehran's nuclear development after a decade of frustrating negotiations, according to diplomats. They said the proposed framework agreement, which could still falter, would require Iran to halt at least some enrichment activities in exchange for partial easing of economic sanctions. They described the expected accord as a significant first step intended to buy six months and perhaps longer to pursue a comprehensive final agreement.
NEWS
April 14, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Organization of American States voted late Monday to deplore Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori's seizure of power but stopped short of imposing economic sanctions. The 32-0 vote, with Peru abstaining, came after Secretary of State James A. Baker III pledged that Western democracies will help Peru solve its severe economic problems if it restores the constitutional government but warned that the nation faces international isolation that will deepen its poverty if it does not.
WORLD
August 4, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Patrick J. McDonnell, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
TEHRAN - Iran's new president, Hassan Rouhani, said Sunday that his nation would not be intimidated by threats and demanded “respect” from the global community. “If you want the right response, it should not be through the language of sanctions, it should be through the language of discourse and respect,” Rouhani said in a pointed message to outside nations during his official swearing in at the parliament here. “Iran does not pursue war.” Rouhani, 64, a moderate cleric who was a surprise victor in June's elections, officially assumed office on Saturday but took the formal oath of office Sunday for his four-year term.
WORLD
June 11, 2013 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels
TEHRAN -- Leading reformist candidate Mohammad Reza Aref announced Tuesday that he was dropping out of the race to be Iran's next president , leaving centrist Hassan Rowhani as the sole moderate-leaning candidate in Friday's election. There had been earlier calls for Aref, a former vice president, to step aside to strengthen Rowhani's chances. Aref said former President Mohammad Khatami, a reformist, had urged him to withdraw.   Rowhani, 65, who previously headed Iran's nuclear negotiating team, is the only cleric among the eight presidential candidates vetted by the powerful Guardian Council.
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