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Economic Sanctions Iran

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alireza Mahdavi had barely returned home to Westwood from his native Iran when a cousin embroiled him in a familiar, passionate debate, one rocking the Iranian diaspora across the country. Mahdavi hopes the United States will lift the economic sanctions it placed on Iran. His cousin wants them to stay. "Over the dinner table, he asked me, 'Why are you wasting your time going back and forth to Iran, promoting the lifting of sanctions when you could be growing your business in the United States?'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Alireza Mahdavi had barely returned home to Westwood from his native Iran when a cousin embroiled him in a familiar, passionate debate, one rocking the Iranian diaspora across the country. Mahdavi hopes the United States will lift the economic sanctions it placed on Iran. His cousin wants them to stay. "Over the dinner table, he asked me, 'Why are you wasting your time going back and forth to Iran, promoting the lifting of sanctions when you could be growing your business in the United States?'
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NEWS
January 13, 1987 | From United Press International
A 105-year-old man who stages fasts to protest U.S. economic sanctions against Iran has joined a squad of teen-age volunteers in a "crash unit" used to defuse Iraqi land mines, Iran's official Islamic Republic News Agency said Monday. In a brief dispatch from the battlefront, the news agency said that Yaqub Noruzi volunteered for military service when Iran went to war with Iraq in September, 1980, and now serves in the "crash unit," clearing Iraqi mine fields.
WORLD
September 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
Iran acknowledged Monday that additional traces of weapons-grade uranium had been found on its soil but argued that they came from abroad on contaminated equipment. The United States and some of its allies have accused Tehran of running a secret nuclear weapons program. Iran is facing an Oct. 31 deadline to give a full accounting of its nuclear activities, set by the International Atomic Energy Agency board of governors. If the board rules at its Nov.
NEWS
November 1, 1987
Japan has turned down a U.S. request to join in economic sanctions against Iran. "Given that the U.N. secretary general is still continuing his efforts (to mediate in the Iran-Iraq conflict). . . we think it is too early to take economic measures against Iran," Deputy Foreign Minister Ryohei Murata told U.S. Under Secretary of State Michael H. Armacost at a meeting in Tokyo. Japan, which imports virtually all its oil, buys about 7% from Iran. West Germany also has rejected the U.S.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Britain's Standard Chartered bank has agreed to a $327-million settlement with U.S. officials, who have been investigating the bank for possible violations of economic sanctions against Iran and other countries. The settlement, announced Monday, includes $132 million paid to the Treasury Department's Office of Foreign Asset Control and $100 million paid to the Federal Reserve. Treasury officials said the settlement resolves probes into apparent violations by the bank's London and Dubai offices from 2001 to 2007 of U.S. economic sanctions against Iran, Burma, Libya and Sudan, as well as a case involving sanctions related to foreign narcotics kingpins.
WORLD
September 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
European leaders are considering their own economic sanctions against Iran over its refusal to halt its nuclear program, France's foreign minister said Sunday. Bernard Kouchner also warned that the international community should be prepared for the possibility of war if Iran obtains atomic weapons. The U.S. and other world powers accuse Iran of seeking nuclear weapons; Tehran says its uranium enrichment activities are aimed at producing energy. Negotiations and two sets of U.N.
WORLD
October 16, 2013 | By Paul Richter
GENEVA - Iran and six world powers Wednesday hailed the latest round of negotiations on Tehran's disputed nuclear program as “substantive and forward looking” and set an accelerated schedule of meetings to find whether they can strike the deal both sides want. The discussions, begun at a moment of renewed hope for progress, were described as difficult and tense at times. Yet the Iranians and their negotiating partners were able to reach a rare agreement on a joint statement praising each side and signaling their commitment to a diplomatic solution to the standoff.
WORLD
February 2, 2014 | By David Willman, This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.
WASHINGTON - Hillary Rodham Clinton is backing President Obama's opposition to new economic sanctions against Iran. Obama announced in his State of the Union address last week that he would veto any legislation that called for such sanctions, as negotiations to extend an interim nuclear weapons agreement proceed. Some prominent Republicans support new sanctions. Clinton, the former secretary of State and presumed early frontrunner for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, detailed her position in a Jan. 26 letter to the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Democrat Carl Levin of Michigan.
OPINION
August 19, 2007
Re "Fencing with Tehran," editorial, Aug. 12 I had a good belly laugh when your editorial advocating economic sanctions against Iran talked about Iranian provocations. The "provocations" are claims that Iran, as official policy of the state, trains Iraqi insurgents and supplies them with improvised explosive devices. There is no evidence that either of these claims is true.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
State insurance regulators and trade groups have settled a pair of lawsuits stemming from efforts to pressure insurers to stop investing in corporations engaged in energy, nuclear or defense-related work in Iran. California Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones announced the settlement late Friday. At issue was a controversial 2009 initiative by Jones' predecessor, Steve Poizner, that threatened to penalize insurance companies and publicize their investments in companies that indirectly benefit the government of Iran.
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