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Economy Forecasts

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BUSINESS
December 31, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It would be helpful if the economic outlook at the start of every year came equipped with a You Are Here arrow. To see where you're going, it's good to know the starting point. Heading into 1996, there is an undercurrent of deflation in the economy. That means falling prices, as distinct from disinflation, which is the slowing of the rise in prices. The U.S. economy exhibits both tendencies at this new year, and that's why interest rates will be easing downward--getting as low as 5.
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BUSINESS
February 18, 2009 | Roger Vincent
The declining Southern California economy may bottom out as soon as this summer, but more financial grief is coming as local industries struggle to cope with the recession, a prominent business trade group said in a forecast to be released today. Economic news this year will be "mostly bad," according to the 2009-10 forecast by the Kyser Center for Economic Research at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. The state's economic downturn is expected to hit bottom before the end of 2009, but when growth resumes it will be moderate at best, the Kyser Center said.
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BUSINESS
April 19, 1999
The International Monetary Fund will issue views and forecasts on the state of the world economy on Tuesday, amid signs that a deep economic crisis may at last have passed its peak. The launch of the IMF's World Economic Outlook will be followed by a string of top-level gatherings in Washington this week as the IMF and the World Bank hold their spring meetings.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Japan's economy grew 0.9% in October to December from the previous quarter, government data showed, above market expectations for a 0.4% increase. It translated into an annualized increase of 3.7%, compared with a consensus market forecast of a 1.6% rise.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | From Reuters
The leading non-communist industrial economies, which appeared to be on the brink of a recession a year ago, are at their most buoyant since the early 1970s, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development said today. A half-yearly report by the Paris-based economic affairs think tank said industrial output in its 24 member nations has grown at an annual rate of more than 4% since mid-1987. The brisk expansion has been widespread.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1985 | BILL RITTER, San Diego County Business Editor
San Diego's economy in 1986 will outpace California's, which in turn will exceed the nation's growth, a pattern mirrored in prior years, a Bank of America economist predicted Tuesday. The difference next year is that the gap between the growth rates of the region, state and nation will narrow, reflecting the state's weakening agricultural and computer/high-technology sectors, according to Frederick L. Cannon, head of regional and resource economics for San Francisco-based Bank of America.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Japan's economy grew 0.9% in October to December from the previous quarter, government data showed, above market expectations for a 0.4% increase. It translated into an annualized increase of 3.7%, compared with a consensus market forecast of a 1.6% rise.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2009 | Roger Vincent
The declining Southern California economy may bottom out as soon as this summer, but more financial grief is coming as local industries struggle to cope with the recession, a prominent business trade group said in a forecast to be released today. Economic news this year will be "mostly bad," according to the 2009-10 forecast by the Kyser Center for Economic Research at the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. The state's economic downturn is expected to hit bottom before the end of 2009, but when growth resumes it will be moderate at best, the Kyser Center said.
BUSINESS
December 16, 1993 | DAVID W. MYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an especially grim assessment of California's long-term economic future, the UCLA Business Forecasting Project said Wednesday that cutbacks in defense spending and layoffs in other key industries will prevent the state from ever returning to its postwar glory days.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leading economists Monday forecast high unemployment, slower growth and rising inflation in the coming year as a unified Germany grapples with an economy that remains "deeply divided." In their biannual report, researchers at five key economic institutes outlined changes wrought by German unification and world events including the Persian Gulf crisis.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2006 | Bill Sing, Times Staff Writer
Like a ship cruising through tranquil seas, the Southern California economy generally faces smooth sailing this year. But rougher waters could be in store next year. That's the view of the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. In its midyear economic forecast update, to be formally released today, the nonprofit business advocacy organization said the Southland economy would turn in a "solid performance" this year, despite the cooling of the region's once-sizzling housing market.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County will suffer the brunt of California's economic downturn, but a statewide recovery should begin by next summer, according to a growing number of business forecasters. These forecasters predict that many of the state's business centers, including San Diego and all the counties bordering Los Angeles County, will avoid falling into recession. Instead, these areas simply are expected to expand at a slower pace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2001 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the terror attacks of Sept. 11, the San Fernando Valley's economic engine was faltering. Private employment growth had slowed to a near standstill. Unemployment claims had started to climb. Building permits--a sign of future construction--had dramatically dropped. The slowdown was widespread, according to an annual report on the Valley's economy released today by Cal State Northridge.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2001 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chapman University economists have become more pessimistic about Orange County's economy, saying Wednesday that employment won't grow as fast as previously expected, a reflection of the national economic slowdown. The midyear update trimmed projected job growth more than 25%, or 14,000 jobs. After earlier predicting annual job growth of 3.5% for the county this year, the economists now see a 2.4% gain, picking up slightly in 2002.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2001 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Reserve policymakers are all but certain to cut short-term interest rates this week for a sixth time this year, and are likely to point to the usual suspect: a corporate sector whose weakness stands in sharp contrast to the consumer sector's resilience. Just how worried the Fed still is about U.S. companies' shrinking earnings will be evident in the size of this week's cut--and in the statement the central bank issues with its decision, expected late Wednesday morning Pacific time.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Slower national growth, coupled with surging California energy prices and the potential for bitter Hollywood strikes by writers and actors this summer, will make 2001 the most turbulent economic year for Los Angeles since the Asian economic crisis three years ago, according to the latest forecast on the region's economy for 2001. The report, issued Tuesday and prepared by Chapman University in Orange, stopped short of predicting a recession either in the region or nationally.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2001 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The San Francisco Bay Area and Los Angeles County will suffer the brunt of California's economic downturn, but a statewide recovery should begin by next summer, according to a growing number of business forecasters. These forecasters predict that many of the state's business centers, including San Diego and all the counties bordering Los Angeles County, will avoid falling into recession. Instead, these areas simply are expected to expand at a slower pace.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2001 | TOM PETRUNO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal Reserve policymakers are all but certain to cut short-term interest rates this week for a sixth time this year, and are likely to point to the usual suspect: a corporate sector whose weakness stands in sharp contrast to the consumer sector's resilience. Just how worried the Fed still is about U.S. companies' shrinking earnings will be evident in the size of this week's cut--and in the statement the central bank issues with its decision, expected late Wednesday morning Pacific time.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2000 | STUART SILVERSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite emerging problems that are likely to slow California businesses, the state's expansion will chug ahead next year whether or not the nation stumbles into recession, according to a variety of economic forecasts. Even UCLA forecasters, who Monday delivered the most downbeat of a recent cluster of economic reports on the outlook for California and the Los Angeles area, predicted that the state will shift into no worse than a moderate rate of growth.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2000 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regional economists say there's little chance Southern California will escape a national economic slowdown that looms next year. But the region's diversified economy will make it more resilient than a decade ago, when it suffered its worst recession since the Great Depression. The economic predictions are the first of a series of regional forecasts planned for this week and next.
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