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Economy Southeast Asia

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BUSINESS
April 9, 2001 | From Reuters
Stung by sagging U.S. demand for their exports and worried by a falling yen, Southeast Asian countries said on Sunday that they expect the region's growth to slow to 3% to 5% this year from 5.3% in 2000. The 10 members of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations made the bearish forecast in a communique issued at the end of their finance ministers' two-day meeting in Kuala Lumpur.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2001 | From Reuters
Stung by sagging U.S. demand for their exports and worried by a falling yen, Southeast Asian countries said on Sunday that they expect the region's growth to slow to 3% to 5% this year from 5.3% in 2000. The 10 members of the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations made the bearish forecast in a communique issued at the end of their finance ministers' two-day meeting in Kuala Lumpur.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 1994 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A T-shirt noticed recently in Singapore by Steve Craven, senior commercial officer at the U.S. Embassy, seemed to sum up a prevailing value in that trade-rich city-state. Starting with big letters at the top and repeating in descending rows of smaller and smaller type, it declared: "MONEY, money, money, money, money . . ."
BUSINESS
June 13, 1994 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A T-shirt noticed recently in Singapore by Steve Craven, senior commercial officer at the U.S. Embassy, seemed to sum up a prevailing value in that trade-rich city-state. Starting with big letters at the top and repeating in descending rows of smaller and smaller type, it declared: "MONEY, money, money, money, money . . ."
NEWS
July 4, 1992 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Historians will record that the first official act this week of newly elected Philippine President Fidel V. Ramos was to sign an executive order extending tax-free imports of cement and clinker, a construction compound. Never known for soaring rhetoric or bold action, Ramos, the general dubbed "Steady Eddie," maintained a low profile and no-frills approach as he assumed leadership of this troubled country. His most dramatic act was to order hundreds of Malacanang Palace aides to appear at 6 a.m.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A week after Burma declared the bulk of its currency worthless, commerce in Rangoon, the capital, remained sluggish and confused, according to reports reaching here Friday. Most food stores and small retail shops were open but there was little business at the big Scott's Market, which specializes in clothing, or at stores dealing in big-ticket household appliances and electronic equipment. Downtown hotels were empty, according to an American businessman returning to Bangkok.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese from Taiwan are finding themselves among the most courted potential foreign investors anywhere. "Every other week, we see newspaper advertisements by foreign governments organizing investment-promotion seminars (in Taiwan) to explain the advantages of investing in their countries," said K. H. Wu, deputy chairman of the China Trade Development Council. The attractiveness of Taiwan's investors is not hard to explain.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
Last year, Ngo Thi Bich Hanh visited Los Angeles to meet with CBS executives to arrange the launch of a Vietnamese version of the game show "The Price Is Right." This week, Ngo was back in Southern California to explore whether the price was right for nearly a dozen Vietnamese feature films she was offering buyers at Santa Monica's annual American Film Market.
MAGAZINE
May 20, 1990 | ALAN BERLOW, Alan Berlow is a free-lance journalist based in Manila.
THERE IS A SURREAL and, at the same time, ethereal quality to Burma's capital city of Rangoon. At dawn, Buddhist monks in rust- or wine-colored robes fan out through the city, walking from house to house with shiny, black-lacquered begging bowls, silently accepting offerings of rice or fish. They pass through streets and parks where palm readers and astrologers unlock the secrets of life, where snake oil salesmen and sundry merchants of miracles patiently minister to their customers.
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