Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEconomy Turkey
IN THE NEWS

Economy Turkey

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Turkey's economy minister Saturday warned of more hardships as he announced an austerity program that called for cuts in government spending, a cap on hiring and reforms of the ailing banking system. At least 10,000 protesters took to the streets Saturday in Istanbul, demanding that the government resign amid economic chaos that has led to mass layoffs and rising prices.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
Turkey's economy minister Saturday warned of more hardships as he announced an austerity program that called for cuts in government spending, a cap on hiring and reforms of the ailing banking system. At least 10,000 protesters took to the streets Saturday in Istanbul, demanding that the government resign amid economic chaos that has led to mass layoffs and rising prices.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Five decades after the Cold War turned this border post into a hot spot where East met West, the Soviet invasion has finally begun. But the invaders are largely small-time traders, and the Turks welcome the opening of the frontier as an opportunity to expand trade and influence.
OPINION
December 13, 2002 | Soner Cagaptay, Soner Cagaptay is coordinator of the Turkish research program at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.
Of the 13 candidate countries waiting to enter the European Union, 12 -- including Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania and Malta -- are expected to be promised membership at today's meeting in Copenhagen. Only Turkey is likely to be left out. Ankara has been told that its human rights record does not meet European standards and that Turkey needs to improve its democracy. If Turkey does its assigned homework, then the EU might take another look in the future.
NEWS
December 26, 1995 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After an 85% voter turnout boosted the pro-Islamic Welfare Party and delivered one of this country's most complicated parliamentary equations ever, Turkish Prime Minister Tansu Ciller resigned Monday to give President Suleyman Demirel a free hand to appoint a premier-designate who he feels can find a majority of 276 seats in the 550-seat assembly. "We are now in a race, a race to form a coalition," Welfare Party leader Necmettin Erbakan told reporters.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turkish President Turgut Ozal said Wednesday that he would commit his nation's army--by far the most potent force on Iraq's border--to an armed struggle against Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's regime if the action is sanctioned by the United Nations. Talking to a small group of reporters, Ozal said Turkey and the rest of the world would be better off if Hussein is not allowed to survive the current Persian Gulf crisis with his army intact.
WORLD
August 23, 2002 | AMBERIN ZAMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A popular former economy minister will run for parliament this fall as a member of a leading center-left party, boosting the faction's hopes of challenging the Islamic-leaning forces that have been widely expected to top the polls. Kemal Dervis, who was brought home from the World Bank in Washington last year to pull Turkey out of its worst financial crisis since World War II, said he would join the Republican People's Party today.
WORLD
November 7, 2006 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
They're calling it a train crash here, the seemingly inevitable collision between this large Muslim nation and the Europe it has courted for years. Those gauging Turkey's once promising program of reforms, aimed at modernizing its democracy and facilitating membership in the European Union, see a troubled landscape: Turkish writers, journalists and even a 93-year-old academic are hauled into court on charges they insulted their country.
WORLD
July 17, 2002 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a top U.S. defense official held talks here on a possible military strike against Iraq, such planning was complicated Tuesday when the political parties in the rapidly unraveling government of Prime Minister Bulent Ecevit agreed to hold early elections. The ailing Ecevit had fiercely resisted calls to move parliamentary elections up from 2004 to November, but his hand was forced when further defections from his party reduced the government to controlling half the seats in parliament.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1993 | JAMES FLANIGAN
With radical bombers in New York and Saddam Hussein dodging Tomahawk missiles in Baghdad because he tried to kill George Bush in Kuwait, chances for normal developments of local economies and U.S. relations with the Middle East look particularly grim at the moment. Some U.S. experts, including former national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski, say conflict is inevitable between the United States and the world of Islam. And Sunday talk shows dismiss the Arab world as irrational.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|