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NEWS
September 29, 1989
Troops were occupying Ecuadorean oil installations in an attempt to end a two-day-old strike by Texaco workers, who are demanding severance pay before the company hands over control of the main pipeline to the state oil company. Texaco and Petroleos de Ecuador (Petroecuador) operate Ecuador's oil facilities under a consortium arrangement. Texaco is to give control of the main pipeline to Petroecuador on Sunday.
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NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Jamil Mahuad announced tax hikes and other tough economic measures in Ecuador's latest attempt to address its worst financial crisis in decades. The announcement came as a two-day nationwide strike to protest the government's economic programs wound down and just hours after the Central Bank's board of directors, including President Luis Jacome, resigned. The government's political opponents had accused Jacome of mismanaging Ecuador's fiscal policy.
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NEWS
March 26, 1987
Protesters in Ecuador battled government loyalists and police in several cities during a 24-hour strike against austerity measures. At least 12 people were reported wounded by gunfire or gasoline bombs. President Leon Febres Cordero imposed the harsh economic regimen, including an 80% boost in gasoline prices, after earthquakes March 5-6 crippled the country's oil industry. Officials said gunfire from a crowd of about 300 opponents of the walkout wounded four strikers in Quito.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | Reuters
As many as 500,000 workers staged a 24-hour strike Thursday, with some blocking roads and burning tires, to protest a government increase in fuel prices. The United Workers Front claimed that half a million members, mostly public sector teachers, university professors and doctors, heeded the call for the daylong strike, but that figure could not be confirmed.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | Reuters
As many as 500,000 workers staged a 24-hour strike Thursday, with some blocking roads and burning tires, to protest a government increase in fuel prices. The United Workers Front claimed that half a million members, mostly public sector teachers, university professors and doctors, heeded the call for the daylong strike, but that figure could not be confirmed.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Jamil Mahuad announced tax hikes and other tough economic measures in Ecuador's latest attempt to address its worst financial crisis in decades. The announcement came as a two-day nationwide strike to protest the government's economic programs wound down and just hours after the Central Bank's board of directors, including President Luis Jacome, resigned. The government's political opponents had accused Jacome of mismanaging Ecuador's fiscal policy.
NEWS
July 13, 1989 | From Reuters
Demonstrators set up roadblocks and clashed with police Wednesday in scattered incidents at the start of a general strike to press for the doubling of the minimum wage. Protesters threw stones and blocked roadways with bricks and flaming tires in the port of Guayaquil, Ecuador's biggest city, television footage showed. Police used tear gas and water cannon to disperse demonstrators and clear streets.
NEWS
September 29, 1989
Troops were occupying Ecuadorean oil installations in an attempt to end a two-day-old strike by Texaco workers, who are demanding severance pay before the company hands over control of the main pipeline to the state oil company. Texaco and Petroleos de Ecuador (Petroecuador) operate Ecuador's oil facilities under a consortium arrangement. Texaco is to give control of the main pipeline to Petroecuador on Sunday.
NEWS
March 26, 1987
Protesters in Ecuador battled government loyalists and police in several cities during a 24-hour strike against austerity measures. At least 12 people were reported wounded by gunfire or gasoline bombs. President Leon Febres Cordero imposed the harsh economic regimen, including an 80% boost in gasoline prices, after earthquakes March 5-6 crippled the country's oil industry. Officials said gunfire from a crowd of about 300 opponents of the walkout wounded four strikers in Quito.
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