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NEWS
August 31, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At times when dictatorships prevailed elsewhere in Latin America, elected governments in the Andean nations withstood adversity. Yet for tens of millions of people here in Ecuador and neighboring nations, democracy seems to have delivered little more than elections. Brutal inequality, economic breakdown and lawlessness are spawning political instability and a rise of militaristic strongmen.
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WORLD
August 16, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Britain doesn't want him. Ecuador does. Therein lies a very large rub. A tense diplomatic faceoff grew uglier Thursday after Ecuador announced it was granting political asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of the whistle-blowing WikiLeaks website who has been holed up for the last two months in its embassy in an upscale London neighborhood. Officials in Quito say Assange faces political persecution for releasing confidential documents embarrassing to the U.S. and other governments, and demanded that he be given safe passage out of Britain.
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NEWS
June 18, 1990 | Associated Press
Voters dealt center-left President Rodrigo Borja Cevallos a political defeat in legislative elections Sunday, giving his rightist opposition potential control of Congress, according to early unofficial returns. The victory by opposition parties is likely to bring an end to the political calm that has marked this small Andean nation in the last several years.
NEWS
August 31, 2000 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At times when dictatorships prevailed elsewhere in Latin America, elected governments in the Andean nations withstood adversity. Yet for tens of millions of people here in Ecuador and neighboring nations, democracy seems to have delivered little more than elections. Brutal inequality, economic breakdown and lawlessness are spawning political instability and a rise of militaristic strongmen.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's top military commanders have offered to resign, four months after the high command refused to put down an abortive rebellion that toppled the president, officials said. Gen. Telmo Sandoval, head of the joint chiefs of staff, Vice Adm. Enrique Monteverde, head of the navy, and air force Gen. Ricardo Irgoyen presented their resignations Monday. The military-backed uprising Jan. 21 led to the ouster of President Jamil Mahuad, who was succeeded by Gustavo Noboa.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congress selected its own leader, Fabian Alarcon, as interim president in a move aimed at ending a weeklong political crisis. Alarcon, who received the presidential sash in a swearing-in ceremony, is to call elections within 12 months and govern until August 1998. Flamboyant former President Abdala Bucaram, who calls himself El Loco, or "the crazy one," was sacked Thursday by Congress for "mental instability."
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's deposed president, Abdala Bucaram, was granted political asylum in Panama, the Foreign Ministry said. The measure, effective last Thursday, covered Bucaram's wife, their four children and Bucaram's brother, Santiago, who was expelled from Ecuador's National Chamber of Representatives. Bucaram was deposed by the legislature Feb. 6 and traveled to Panama a few days later. Ecuador's Supreme Court has issued a warrant for Bucaram's arrest.
WORLD
August 16, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Britain doesn't want him. Ecuador does. Therein lies a very large rub. A tense diplomatic faceoff grew uglier Thursday after Ecuador announced it was granting political asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of the whistle-blowing WikiLeaks website who has been holed up for the last two months in its embassy in an upscale London neighborhood. Officials in Quito say Assange faces political persecution for releasing confidential documents embarrassing to the U.S. and other governments, and demanded that he be given safe passage out of Britain.
OPINION
December 28, 2004 | Michael Shifter
As shown by its reaction to the disputed elections in Ukraine, Washington can do a lot to defend democracy. But Washington isn't paying much attention to the ominous slide of democracy closer to home. Ecuador, where a recent rupture in democratic practices has sadly gone unnoticed, is a case in point. The South American nation of about 13 million people was, in 1979, among the first in the region to turn from military, authoritarian government to constitutional rule.
TRAVEL
January 12, 2003 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
There are more than 50 Galapagos Islands, and of that territory 97% has been set aside as a wildlife refuge since 1959. The remaining 3% of that Ecuadorean archipelago is populated by people: about 20,000 of them, from poachers to scientists to hookers to hoteliers. It's the lives of those people that this book examines.
NEWS
May 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's top military commanders have offered to resign, four months after the high command refused to put down an abortive rebellion that toppled the president, officials said. Gen. Telmo Sandoval, head of the joint chiefs of staff, Vice Adm. Enrique Monteverde, head of the navy, and air force Gen. Ricardo Irgoyen presented their resignations Monday. The military-backed uprising Jan. 21 led to the ouster of President Jamil Mahuad, who was succeeded by Gustavo Noboa.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Ecuador's deposed president, Abdala Bucaram, was granted political asylum in Panama, the Foreign Ministry said. The measure, effective last Thursday, covered Bucaram's wife, their four children and Bucaram's brother, Santiago, who was expelled from Ecuador's National Chamber of Representatives. Bucaram was deposed by the legislature Feb. 6 and traveled to Panama a few days later. Ecuador's Supreme Court has issued a warrant for Bucaram's arrest.
NEWS
February 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Congress selected its own leader, Fabian Alarcon, as interim president in a move aimed at ending a weeklong political crisis. Alarcon, who received the presidential sash in a swearing-in ceremony, is to call elections within 12 months and govern until August 1998. Flamboyant former President Abdala Bucaram, who calls himself El Loco, or "the crazy one," was sacked Thursday by Congress for "mental instability."
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | Associated Press
Voters dealt center-left President Rodrigo Borja Cevallos a political defeat in legislative elections Sunday, giving his rightist opposition potential control of Congress, according to early unofficial returns. The victory by opposition parties is likely to bring an end to the political calm that has marked this small Andean nation in the last several years.
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