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Ecuador Trade

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BUSINESS
April 6, 1998 | Reuters
Presidents of South America's Andean nations wound up a two-day meeting in Guayaquil, Ecuador, agreeing to work toward free trade in services within their five-nation bloc by 2005. The Andean Community leaders signed an accord aimed at beginning negotiations on such trade in the first half of this year.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1998 | Reuters
Presidents of South America's Andean nations wound up a two-day meeting in Guayaquil, Ecuador, agreeing to work toward free trade in services within their five-nation bloc by 2005. The Andean Community leaders signed an accord aimed at beginning negotiations on such trade in the first half of this year.
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NEWS
January 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What once seemed like ivory tower daydreaming is now reality in the making: Huge trade blocs are forming up and down the Americas to let goods and services pass freely across international borders. Not only is there a NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement, stretching from the Yukon to the Yucatan. There is also a SAFTA--a South American free-trade area that extends from Amazonia to Patagonia.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | From Reuters
One year after their brief war in a remote stretch of Amazon jungle, Peru and Ecuador are again rattling sabers over a half-century-old border dispute. Accusations of troop incursions, air-space violations, arms purchases and misinformation campaigns have been flying between Lima and Quito with increasing regularity and hostility in recent days. And the fiercely nationalistic local media and populations on both sides of the disputed border have begun talking as if another war is in the offing.
NEWS
January 5, 1996 | From Reuters
One year after their brief war in a remote stretch of Amazon jungle, Peru and Ecuador are again rattling sabers over a half-century-old border dispute. Accusations of troop incursions, air-space violations, arms purchases and misinformation campaigns have been flying between Lima and Quito with increasing regularity and hostility in recent days. And the fiercely nationalistic local media and populations on both sides of the disputed border have begun talking as if another war is in the offing.
WORLD
October 1, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Voters on Sunday appeared to clear the way for socialist President Rafael Correa to try to "reinvent" Ecuador, the continent's most politically unstable country, giving his supporters a majority of seats in a new constitutional assembly. Exit polls showed Correa's National Alliance slate leading in a majority of races in several provinces. Pollster Hugo Barber here of the Quito-based Datanalisis firm said he expected Correa's candidates to take at least 70 of 130 seats in the assembly.
OPINION
December 3, 2009
Peasant farmers in the Andean nations of Colombia, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru often have a choice of growing two crops: flowers for export to the United States or coca for cocaine production. In accordance with U.S. anti-drug policy, Colombia and Peru have stepped up enforcement on coca cultivation, if to little avail. Bolivia doesn't even try: President Evo Morales, who is head of the largest coca growers union, defends it as part of Bolivia's cultural patrimony. But in Ecuador, roses have kept coca at bay. Ecuador's flower industry blossomed after President George H.W. Bush signed a regional trade agreement in 1991, which Congress extended and expanded as the Andean Trade Promotion and Drug Eradication Act of 2002.
NATIONAL
May 10, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democratic and Republican negotiators announced Thursday that they had cleared obstacles to Senate passage of a bill granting President Bush greater authority to negotiate international trade agreements. Central to the agreement is a package of expanded benefits, including a 70% federal health insurance subsidy, for qualified workers who lose jobs in domestic industries hurt by foreign competition.
WORLD
August 29, 2008 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
With no sign of a thaw in their frozen diplomatic relations, Ecuador this week called on Colombia to increase its military presence along their shared border to check the spillover of rebel groups, drug trafficking and war refugees. The demand was one of several laid out by officials as they argued that their nation had paid too high a price for its neighbor's decades-long civil conflict and that Colombia must take more responsibility for the encroaching violence. The two nations seem far from repairing the rift triggered six months ago, when Colombian troops crossed the border to kill a rebel leader holed up in Ecuador.
OPINION
June 17, 2011 | By Jorge CastaƱeda
Which country holds the record for the tallest artificial Christmas tree? Mexico. The biggest taco? Mexico. The greatest number of people kissing each other for the longest period of time? The most people dancing together to Michael Jackson's "Thriller"? Mexico and Mexico. You could view this obsession with getting into the Guinness book of world records as a charming national idiosyncrasy. But there is also a more disturbing explanation. As a people, Mexicans shun genuine competition.
NEWS
January 1, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What once seemed like ivory tower daydreaming is now reality in the making: Huge trade blocs are forming up and down the Americas to let goods and services pass freely across international borders. Not only is there a NAFTA--the North American Free Trade Agreement, stretching from the Yukon to the Yucatan. There is also a SAFTA--a South American free-trade area that extends from Amazonia to Patagonia.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2002 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing economic and political chaos two years ago, Ecuador replaced its national currency, the sucre, with U.S. dollars. The move calmed the country that suffered through an inflation rate of 30% a month, was on its fourth president in three years and had even been the scene of a brief coup attempt. Dollarization may have brought a much-needed stability, but it has also produced a new problem: a widening trade deficit.
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