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OPINION
March 13, 2004
Your March 6 obituary on the death of former Ecuadorean President Carlos Julio Arosemena brought back a memory of his immortal way with words. The day after he misbehaved at a cocktail party at the U.S. Embassy in 1963, the Ecuadorean army kicked him out of office. As Arosemena was hustled onto a plane leaving the country, he hurled this parting shot at his opponents: "My enemies are Creole Calvinists with a brilliant future behind them." Anthony Saidy Los Angeles
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SPORTS
July 29, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Former Ecuadorean international and Mexican league soccer star Christian "Chucho" Benitez died Monday morning in Qatar after going into cardiorespiratory arrest. The 27-year-old, who signed with Qatari club Al Jaish less than a month ago, died in a hospital after being admitted with a severe stomach ache. Hours earlier he had made his Al Jaish debut in the Sheikh Jassem Cup. According to the player's father-in-law, the stomach pains were the result of complications relating to appendicitis.
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NATIONAL
November 6, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
One of seven teenagers accused in the fatal attack on a Latino immigrant pleaded guilty to gang assault and hate crime charges and agreed to testify against the other defendants. Nicholas Hausch entered his plea in Suffolk County Court. He could be sentenced to five to 25 years in prison. The teens are accused in the Nov. 8, 2008, killing of Ecuadorean immigrant Marcelo Lucero in Patchogue in eastern Long Island.
WORLD
June 26, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Richard A. Serrano
MOSCOW - Edward Snowden's request for political asylum in Ecuador could take up to two months to approve, the country's foreign minister said Wednesday, and he suggested that the U.S. fugitive could end his airport-layover limbo by seeking sanctuary inside the Ecuadorean Embassy here. Snowden has not been officially admitted to Russia and remains in the Sheremetyevo airport's "transit zone. " Russian President Vladimir Putin has encouraged him to hurry up and leave. Snowden might be able to make it to the South American nation's embassy - about a 20-minute ride at night when traffic thins out - under the diplomatic protection of the ambassador's car. "If he goes to the embassy, we will make a decision," said Ricardo Patino, Ecuador's foreign minister.
OPINION
April 29, 2007
Re "Gov. will not meet attorney," April 25, and "Gov.'s green credentials challenged," April 18 The Times twice reported that Ecuadorean trial lawyers are publicly pressuring Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to choose between his commitment to the environment and a California company when in comes to Chevron. This couldn't be further from the truth. Evidence that has been collected in support of Chevron's case in Ecuador is significant; greater than 99% of all soil samples collected from Texaco-remediated areas confirm that its remediation was effective.
OPINION
September 11, 2009
Re "Chevron's legal fireworks," Editorial, Sept. 5 When a company comes into possession of evidence suggesting a crime, it is expected to turn over that evidence to law enforcement officials. Chevron did this when it obtained and verified videos of political party operatives and the sitting judge discussing the ongoing trial against Chevron in Ecuador, and did so publicly to ensure transparency. The evidence on the videotapes is difficult to dispute. Were such conduct to occur in the U.S., The Times would respond with outrage, and justifiably so. But for some reason, your editorial condemns Chevron for advising authorities of this corruption.
WORLD
October 1, 2010 | By Chris Kraul and Paul Rosero, Los Angeles Times
Amid volleys of gunfire and concussion grenade blasts, Ecuadorean armed forces Thursday night rescued President Rafael Correa from a hospital where he had been held for several hours against his will by police mutineers. The rescue ended a 12-hour standoff between the government and dissident police officers who shoved Correa and threw tear gas canisters at him Thursday morning when he arrived at a north Quito police barracks to confront protesters upset over his veto of legislation that would have given police better benefits and salaries.
WORLD
July 6, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Police in Ecuador seized a 100-foot submarine being built by suspected drug traffickers capable of carrying a crew of six and 10 tons of cocaine on underwater voyages lasting up to 10 days — a "game changer" for U.S. anti-drug and border security efforts, officials said Monday. A raid Friday by 120 police officers and soldiers netted the fiberglass sub as it was nearing completion in a clandestine "industrial complex" hidden in mangrove swamps near San Lorenzo, a town just south of the Colombian border.
WORLD
January 15, 2007 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
The United States is battling a dangerous new front in its South American drug war -- just as a protege of anti-American leader Hugo Chavez comes to power in Ecuador vowing to shut down a U.S. base dedicated to narcotics surveillance. Officials have expressed growing concern that this Andean nation is being "Colombianized," illustrated by record cocaine seizures in the last two years, the destruction of a major cocaine-processing lab and a recent gangland-style killing. In recent months, U.S.
NEWS
January 30, 1985 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Pope John Paul II on Tuesday challenged what he called the disproportionate rewards going to capitalist managers, as opposed to those going to workers. The Pope issued the challenge during a Mass in Venezuela's most progressive industrial town before he crossed the South American continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific to begin the second leg of his current pilgrimage in Ecuador.
WORLD
June 17, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON -- Julian Assange, the founder of the WikiLeaks website, is prepared to stay holed up inside the Ecuadorean embassy in London for as long as five years if necessary in order to avoid extradition to Sweden to face what he says are politically motivated allegations of sexual assault, the Ecuadorean foreign minister said Monday. Assange is accused of sexually assaulting two women on separate occasions in Stockholm in August 2010. He was arrested in London in December of that year, which began a series of legal appeals by his attorneys to block his extradition to Sweden.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
It was a tough game that almost came to fisticuffs when one player fouled another. But in the end, it was the red-shirted Salvadorans who beat the Mexicans, 4-2, during a recent adult league soccer game at Delano Recreation Center in Van Nuys. Giovanni Molina, the top scorer with two goals, celebrated at a sidewalk grill where the Nunez family was frying handmade pupusas , a doughy, cheese-and-bean-filled tortilla sold on every corner back home in El Salvador. Molina bought six - three for dinner and three more for tomorrow's lunch.
WORLD
February 28, 2012 | By Cristina Munoz and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
  Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa on Monday pardoned three owner-editors and a columnist at the El Universo newspaper who had been convicted of defaming him in a controversial press freedom case. Brothers Carlos, Cesar and Nicolas Perez and columnist Emilio Palacio had been ordered to pay $42 million in fines and serve three years in prison for publishing an allegedly libelous opinion piece by Palacio in February 2011 in the Guayaquil-based paper, the nation's second-largest.
WORLD
October 1, 2010 | By Chris Kraul and Paul Rosero, Los Angeles Times
Amid volleys of gunfire and concussion grenade blasts, Ecuadorean armed forces Thursday night rescued President Rafael Correa from a hospital where he had been held for several hours against his will by police mutineers. The rescue ended a 12-hour standoff between the government and dissident police officers who shoved Correa and threw tear gas canisters at him Thursday morning when he arrived at a north Quito police barracks to confront protesters upset over his veto of legislation that would have given police better benefits and salaries.
WORLD
July 6, 2010 | By Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
Police in Ecuador seized a 100-foot submarine being built by suspected drug traffickers capable of carrying a crew of six and 10 tons of cocaine on underwater voyages lasting up to 10 days — a "game changer" for U.S. anti-drug and border security efforts, officials said Monday. A raid Friday by 120 police officers and soldiers netted the fiberglass sub as it was nearing completion in a clandestine "industrial complex" hidden in mangrove swamps near San Lorenzo, a town just south of the Colombian border.
WORLD
February 3, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
The beat cop quickly discovered why the three men at the entrance to the storage yard had bolted as he pulled up in his patrol car. Inside the walled enclosure he saw 3 tons of cocaine and a large-scale processing lab, evidence of Ecuador's growing importance as a trafficking hub for illegal drugs. The mid-December raid in this port city's Bastion Popular industrial zone capped a record year for Ecuador's counter-narcotics police. They seized 63 tons of cocaine, twice as much as in 2008, and destroyed seven drug-processing laboratories, up from two. Guayaquil's sprawling port and maze of estuaries and waterways have become a favored staging area for drug shipments to the U.S. and Europe.
WORLD
February 3, 2010 | By Chris Kraul
The beat cop quickly discovered why the three men at the entrance to the storage yard had bolted as he pulled up in his patrol car. Inside the walled enclosure he saw 3 tons of cocaine and a large-scale processing lab, evidence of Ecuador's growing importance as a trafficking hub for illegal drugs. The mid-December raid in this port city's Bastion Popular industrial zone capped a record year for Ecuador's counter-narcotics police. They seized 63 tons of cocaine, twice as much as in 2008, and destroyed seven drug-processing laboratories, up from two. Guayaquil's sprawling port and maze of estuaries and waterways have become a favored staging area for drug shipments to the U.S. and Europe.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2004
As I set out to read about the wonder and magic of experiencing faraway places and peoples in the April 4 Travel section, I was appalled at the emanating ethnocentrism and rigid mind-set of writers Susan Spano ("She Finds a Place to Call Maison, Sweet Maison," Her World) and Ben Brazil ("The Soul of Colonial Quito"). Their articles were dichotomously degrading to the native people of the places they were privileged to visit. I have lived in Europe as a heavily budgeted college student and had not a fraction of Spano's melodrama in finding a delightful living space.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
One of seven teenagers accused in the fatal attack on a Latino immigrant pleaded guilty to gang assault and hate crime charges and agreed to testify against the other defendants. Nicholas Hausch entered his plea in Suffolk County Court. He could be sentenced to five to 25 years in prison. The teens are accused in the Nov. 8, 2008, killing of Ecuadorean immigrant Marcelo Lucero in Patchogue in eastern Long Island.
OPINION
September 11, 2009
Re "Chevron's legal fireworks," Editorial, Sept. 5 When a company comes into possession of evidence suggesting a crime, it is expected to turn over that evidence to law enforcement officials. Chevron did this when it obtained and verified videos of political party operatives and the sitting judge discussing the ongoing trial against Chevron in Ecuador, and did so publicly to ensure transparency. The evidence on the videotapes is difficult to dispute. Were such conduct to occur in the U.S., The Times would respond with outrage, and justifiably so. But for some reason, your editorial condemns Chevron for advising authorities of this corruption.
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