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Ed Fries

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BUSINESS
January 14, 2004 | From Reuters
The veteran Microsoft Corp. executive who headed the company's push into console video game software and is credited with launching several hits, including the PC favorite "Flight Simulator" and "Halo" for the Xbox, has resigned, Microsoft said. Ed Fries, who joined Microsoft in 1985 as an intern, had headed the its game studio since 1995 and was responsible for cementing key relationships with game software publishers when Microsoft introduced its Xbox video game console.
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BUSINESS
January 14, 2004 | From Reuters
The veteran Microsoft Corp. executive who headed the company's push into console video game software and is credited with launching several hits, including the PC favorite "Flight Simulator" and "Halo" for the Xbox, has resigned, Microsoft said. Ed Fries, who joined Microsoft in 1985 as an intern, had headed the its game studio since 1995 and was responsible for cementing key relationships with game software publishers when Microsoft introduced its Xbox video game console.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2003 | Alex Pham
Microsoft Corp. said "Halo 2," a key game for its Xbox console, won't be ready until early 2004, missing this year's holiday season. "We don't want to impose any artificial deadlines for this game," Ed Fries, vice president of games for Microsoft, said in an interview at the Game Developers Conference in San Jose. "We can ship this title whenever, and it will still be huge." The franchise, produced by the Redmond, Wash.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chris Roberts, creator of the Wing Commander line of computer games, is expected to announce today the launch of Digital Anvil, a multimedia interactive software gaming company that will be backed financially by Microsoft Corp. Digital Anvil, which will be based in Austin, Texas, has assembled a pool of creative talent that includes Robert Rodriguez, director of "El Mariachi" and "Desperado." The company plans to release its first multi-player games and interactive movie titles in late 1998.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER
Expanding its push into digital entertainment, Microsoft Corp. is expected to announce today that it has acquired a leading video-game software developer in the Midwest for an undisclosed sum. Privately held Bungie Software Products Corp. of Chicago, known for its line of action games, is the third game firm Microsoft has acquired to bolster its effort to launch a video-game machine late next year. Microsoft's X-Box is set to rival both Sony Corp.'s PlayStation2 and Sega's Dreamcast.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Microsoft Corp. may ship half as many Xbox video game consoles as originally promised when the machine launches Nov. 8, according to a video game industry analyst. Microsoft, which has said it will deliver 600,000 to 800,000 Xbox consoles to stores by Nov. 8, refused to comment Thursday. But analyst John G. Taylor of Arcadia Investments in Portland, Ore., said his conclusions were derived from sources at "almost all" major retailers that expect to carry the $299 game machine.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to succeed where others have failed, Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates today paid homage to Japanese video game fans as the software giant launches an aggressive campaign to push its Xbox game console in the land that gave the world Mario and Sonic. Microsoft plans to spend $500 million whipping up worldwide demand for its black-and-green game machine.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Determined to head off Sony Corp. in the battle to control digital entertainment, Microsoft Corp. Chairman Bill Gates is expected to unveil details Friday about his company's secret video game machine, dubbed the X-Box. The new machine, likely to be released in the United States next year, would rival Sony's much-heralded PlayStation2 and would be a stripped-down computer that connects the television to the Internet.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2002 | Alex Pham, Times Staff Writer
Robin Luckey wants his money back. The Seattle programmer was among the first to buy Microsoft Corp.'s Xbox video game console when it launched last fall. Now the machine gathers dust beneath his television. And none of the games that Microsoft plans to offer this holiday motivates Luckey to fire up his Xbox. "I'd rather have my $300 back," he said.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The $7-billion battle to control digital entertainment escalates today at the Los Angeles Convention Center, where Microsoft Corp. and the world's leading video game companies will square off and spend tens of millions of dollars trying to outshoot one another. Their goal, and the crux of this fierce rivalry, is to dominate a new generation of video game machines.
NEWS
May 17, 2001 | AARON CURTISS, aaron.curtiss@latimes.com
This is a very good year to be someone who plays video games. Confusing, yes, with new set-top consoles from Microsoft, Nintendo and Sony competing for attention. But, frankly, it will be very difficult to make a bad choice--provided buyers understand what they really want from their game machine.
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