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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2007
Ed Harris ("Pollock," "Apollo 13") will reprise his critically acclaimed off-Broadway solo performance in Neil LaBute's "Wrecks" at 8 p.m. June 1, and at 2 and 8 p.m. June 2 at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City. The play deals with an unsettling exploration of love and morality. The production is presented as a benefit for the Archer School for Girls, a private school in Brentwood. Tickets are $110 for the June 1 performance and $65 and $110 for the June 2 shows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By David Ng
"The Face of Love," which opened Friday in Los Angeles and New York, is a movie about a well-to-do L.A. woman (Annette Bening) who becomes obsessed with a man who closely resembles her dead husband (both played by Ed Harris). The movie is a reserved character study, a late-autumn romance and an exploration of the uncanny. It's also an ideal advertisement for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where key sequences of the story were shot. Writer-director Arie Posin shot at LACMA over a four-day period in 2012.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
Ed Harris, known for movies such as "The Right Stuff" and "A Beautiful Mind," will make his debut as a Broadway director next year with a production of Sam Shepard's "Fool for Love." "Fool for Love" is the story of two lovers holed up in a seedy Mojave Desert motel. Harris won an Obie Award for his portrayal of Eddie in the 1983 off-Broadway premiere of the drama. That same year, he and Shepard played astronauts in "The Right Stuff." The production will open Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Robert Abele
In "The Face of Love," it's five years after the devastating loss of her husband when Annette Bening's still-grieving Nikki sees an uncanny look-alike of her dear departed wandering their old haunt, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. As Nikki starts courting Tom (Ed Harris), a local artist with no idea the psychodrama he's walking into, moviegoers can be forgiven for seeing double themselves in the trappings of this skewed, late-in-life romance. But rather than indulging the weird Sirkian "Vertigo" (minus the murder plot)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2005 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Ed HARRIS has lived in movie star country, on a shady piece of Malibu hillside high over the Pacific Ocean, for much of his fruitful 24-year career. He rarely drives down to L.A. to take meetings or lunch with moguls. In fact, watch the balding actor, dressed in faded cotton, walk past two pickup trucks and some rusty patio furniture, and you might mistake him for one of the workmen spiffing up the neighborhood estates on a recent weekday morning. The way he sees it, "I'm not a movie star.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2007 | Sean Mitchell, Special to The Times
Ed Harris, his familiar all-American face several days unshaven, is reflecting on his view of theater in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
AUTHENTIC westerns feature authentic dirt -- muddy chaps, weather-beaten storefronts and hair that's far from blow-dry clean. But the dust storms that occasionally raged during the making of “Appaloosa” took actor-director Ed Harris’ old-fashioned gunslinger story from the realm of the genuine into the domain of the wind tunnel. On a cool afternoon last October, Harris' filmmaking team was battling the dermabrasion elements as the director raced a quickly setting sun. Electricians hid behind goggles.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2012 | Sean Mitchell
The late Robert Altman, while he was making a movie of Sam Shepard's play "Fool for Love," tried to describe the piece to a reporter. "I'm not going to synopsize it," the director said. "It's not a story, and it's not an idea. It's a painting. It's about a place, it's about a culture, a time, relationships, people's awareness or unawareness of their own history. " Ed Harris was in the original production of "Fool for Love" at San Francisco's Magic Theatre in 1983, and now he is in a new play by Beth Henley, "The Jacksonian," about which Altman might have made the same observation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Robert Abele
In "The Face of Love," it's five years after the devastating loss of her husband when Annette Bening's still-grieving Nikki sees an uncanny look-alike of her dear departed wandering their old haunt, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. As Nikki starts courting Tom (Ed Harris), a local artist with no idea the psychodrama he's walking into, moviegoers can be forgiven for seeing double themselves in the trappings of this skewed, late-in-life romance. But rather than indulging the weird Sirkian "Vertigo" (minus the murder plot)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992 | ROBERT KOEHLER, Robert Koehler is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Ed Harris is fiddling with a cigarette while hunched forward on a Southwest-style sofa center stage on a set at the Met Theatre. He is, by nature, quietly intense. But right now, as the compact, square-jawed Harris is mulling a thought over, the intensity is almost palpable. "Turning 40, well. . . ," he says, looking at his cigarette, his feet, then his guest. "You hate to fall into talking about a cliche like a 'midlife crisis,' but maybe that's why cliches are cliches.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Based on true events, in which a Russian submarine likely went rogue during the Cold War of the late 1960s and nearly set off an international nuclear incident, "Phantom" is a modest thriller propelled by a strong cast and straightforward storytelling. Yet there are a few ground rules. There is a diversity of American accents and diction among the supposedly Russian crew - including actors Ed Harris, David Duchovny, William Fichtner, Lance Henriksen, Johnathon Schaech and Kip Pardue - so don't expect any Boris Badenov/Yakov Smirnoff-style speaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Max Greenfield, who plays "New Girl's" resident Jewish assassin/neurotic ladies man Schmidt, isn't quite convinced his character would categorize a Golden Globe nomination as the ultimate Hanukkah gift. "It would be up there," a hoarse-voiced Greenfield said early Thursday morning. "The real gift would be in the type of tuxedo that is involved or what ladies are in attendance. Also, a high-five from Ed Harris would be the bow on the present. " The 32-year-old actor said he got word of his nomination via a phone call at 5:30 a.m. -- though he had been up much earlier due to an arm-punching daughter who was already up. PHOTOS: Golden Globe nominees But he wouldn't have it any other way.  "It's great.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The misbegotten "Virginia" wants to be many things: small-town satire, coming-of-age story, teen romance, portrait of an eccentric and damaged soul, with dabs of crime caper and road trip for good measure. Nothing adds up, though, in this directorial effort from screenwriter Dustin Lance Black ("Milk"). Set among the hangdog hicks and arcade attractions of a fictional Southern beach town, the loosely autobiographical movie aims for roller-coaster passion but only flatlines. In a committed performance that can't overcome the material's shortcomings, Jennifer Connelly plays the title character, an unreliable bottle blond with a history of schizophrenia who's meant to have the poignancy of Blanche DuBois.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling, Los Angeles Times
It was September 2010 and anticipation for Dustin Lance Black's directorial debut at the Toronto International Film Festival was running high. A year earlier, the "Milk" screenwriter had made a splash at the Oscars with his moving acceptance speech touching on the difficulty of growing up gay, transforming him into a hero for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Now, his Southern-set film, "What's Wrong With Virginia" - starring Jennifer Connelly and Ed Harris - was unspooling in Toronto's special presentation section alongside the works of Danny Boyle, John Sayles and Clint Eastwood.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2012
SERIES The Big Bang Theory: Famed physicist Stephen Hawking guest stars as himself on a new episode (8 p.m. CBS). American Idol: The Wanted performs, and Jennifer Lopez debuts her latest video, on the results show "(8 p.m. Fox). Up All Night: Megan Mullally and "SNL's" Fred Armisen guest star on a new episode of the sitcom (9:30 p.m. NBC). Scandal: Kerry Washington and "Lost's" Henry Ian Cusick star in this new drama about a crisis-management firm in Washington D.C. (10:01 p.m. ABC)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2012 | By Thomas Curwen, Los Angeles Times
The office buildings of downtown Los Angeles shield the sun as Christopher Fairbanks whips his '97 BMW through traffic. He's spent the afternoon with his drama students and has no time to waste if he hopes to get to the Geffen Playhouse a half-hour before curtain. As he swings north onto the Hollywood Freeway, he starts working his lines, an opening monologue with a touch of Southern drawl. His character, a dentist, is on the phone to mother, soon having to explain why he's not working.
NEWS
December 10, 2008
Studio Report: The Dec. 3 Studio Report listing possible Oscar contenders for animation, music and crafts categories credited the film "The Boy in the Striped Pajamas" to the Weinstein Co. The movie is from Miramax. "Appaloosa" was credited to Universal Pictures; the Ed Harris film was distributed by New Line Cinema.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2014 | By David Ng
"The Face of Love," which opened Friday in Los Angeles and New York, is a movie about a well-to-do L.A. woman (Annette Bening) who becomes obsessed with a man who closely resembles her dead husband (both played by Ed Harris). The movie is a reserved character study, a late-autumn romance and an exploration of the uncanny. It's also an ideal advertisement for the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, where key sequences of the story were shot. Writer-director Arie Posin shot at LACMA over a four-day period in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
There is a truly heartbreaking moment in "Game Change," the HBO film about Sarah Palin's run for vice president. It comes after Palin (Julianne Moore) has made her galvanizing speech at the Republican National Convention accepting the nomination as John McCain's (Ed Harris) running mate and is drawing jaw-dropping crowds to her meet and greets. Footage is shown of the people waiting hours to meet her, including one rather large and nondescript woman who looks straight at the camera and says: "I have five kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2012 | Sean Mitchell
The late Robert Altman, while he was making a movie of Sam Shepard's play "Fool for Love," tried to describe the piece to a reporter. "I'm not going to synopsize it," the director said. "It's not a story, and it's not an idea. It's a painting. It's about a place, it's about a culture, a time, relationships, people's awareness or unawareness of their own history. " Ed Harris was in the original production of "Fool for Love" at San Francisco's Magic Theatre in 1983, and now he is in a new play by Beth Henley, "The Jacksonian," about which Altman might have made the same observation.
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