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Ed Kienholz

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November 9, 1986 | WILLIAM WILSON
L.A.'s art scene is doing a dervish dance with new museums ready to open, galleries sprouting round and about and big art trade fairs in the works. Anybody, however, stubborn enough to cleave to the belief that art is about artworks finds a lull in the days before the trombones and kettle drums commence. A good thing. When there are obvious exhibitions in plenty it can be like being fed intravenously--nourishment without flavor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By David Colker
Stanley Grinstein, who played a pivotal role in the art scene in Los Angeles as it was evolving in the 1960s and '70s, was an unlikely candidate for that role. He was not an artist or even, at the beginning, a collector. He was in the forklift business and had a great fondness for USC football. But in 1952, Grinstein got married and he and his wife, Elyse, went in search of a pastime they could mutually enjoy. "They were looking for something they could do together, some kind of common ground," said their daughter Ayn Grinstein.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The story of Ed Kienholz's "Five Car Stud" has been something of a mystery for decades. Made in Los Angeles between 1969 and 1972, it was the last work Kienholz completed here before moving to Berlin and one of the most powerful by any measure: a searing indictment of race relations in America, told with a stroke of blunt violence as alarming today as it was the year it was made. The piece was shown, however, only in Germany before being acquired by a Japanese collector and disappearing into the vaults of the museum he would go on to found.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2012
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By D.J. Waldie, For the Los Angeles Times
In September 1945, under a pall of ocher smog and summer heat, Los Angeles entered the postwar world. The city then was bigger, wealthier and more diverse than ever. Its established people — mostly past middle age and conservative, a few who were really rich — still had the narrowness of the Midwest towns from which many of them had come in the 1920s. The city's new people — Okies and Arkies, black Southerners, and white ethnics — had arrived with the war. Few of them had much interest in art. Of course, there was art in Los Angeles they could have seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1996
Reminiscences and critical perspectives on the art of the late Ed Kienholz and his role in the local art scene will be offered during "Ed Kienholz Remembered," Nov. 2 at UCLA's Perloff Hall. The 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2008
I APPLAUD the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for making such a bold statement with its purchase of "The Illegal Operation" by Ed Kienholz ["LACMA Adds Kienholz but Not the Furor," by Suzanne Muchnic, Aug. 20]. In this political year, when Rowe vs. Wade is in danger of being overturned, it is so important that we keep our focus on issues that can effect all of us in one way or another. Through art we can tell this tale. And maybe "we have come along way, baby." Sherry J. Davis Los Angeles -- I FIND it somewhat risible that Ed Kienholz's work should be considered even vaguely controversial now. While sculptures like "Back Seat Dodge '38" and "The Illegal Operation" were shocking and bold within the context of their day, now they are interesting and quaint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By David Colker
Stanley Grinstein, who played a pivotal role in the art scene in Los Angeles as it was evolving in the 1960s and '70s, was an unlikely candidate for that role. He was not an artist or even, at the beginning, a collector. He was in the forklift business and had a great fondness for USC football. But in 1952, Grinstein got married and he and his wife, Elyse, went in search of a pastime they could mutually enjoy. "They were looking for something they could do together, some kind of common ground," said their daughter Ayn Grinstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1988 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
One of Los Angeles' favorite social critics is back in town with more to say about the insidious presence of television and how polluted news filters into our brains. Ed Kienholz created mock TV sets from paint cans and vanity cases some years ago, as a gaggle of early works reminds us. But now he and Nancy Reddin Kienholz have updated the theme, focusing on the Iran-Contra hearings in a series of "portable TVs" called "Double Cross."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
While moonlighting from his career as one of Hollywood's best-known character actors, Sterling Holloway amassed a noteworthy collection of contemporary art. Failing health now forces Holloway to sell his collection and it is being parceled out piecemeal. (The collection is at the Asher/Faure Gallery, 612 N. Almont Drive, to Sept. 13). A number of these works are of museum quality and it's unfortunate that they're soon to disappear yet again into private collections.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Sometimes we seem to know less about the early years of post-World War II art in Los Angeles than we know about the Pleistocene Age mammals dredged up from the La Brea Tar Pits. In the last 30 years, L.A. pushed to the front ranks of international capitals for new art, a dizzying development widely documented — but what happened in the 30 years before that? Yes, we know bits and pieces — some better than others. Repeated censorship attempts by public officials — of a shrine-like 1957 Wallace Berman assemblage sculpture that included a sexy drawing, a 1964 Ed Kienholz assemblage sculpture about carrying on in the back seat of a Dodge, etc. — have been chronicled many times.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011
1945: Alfred Hitchcock's psychological thriller "Spellbound" opens, with memorable dream sequences by Salvador Dalí. 1946: Bassist and composer Charles Mingus, who grew up in Watts, records with his band the Stars of Swing. The recordings, now lost,anticipated the next decade's influential West Coast jazz sound. 1946: Theodor Geisel, who writes children's books under the pen name Dr. Seuss, moves to Hollywood to work for Warner Bros. 1947: Beginning of organized resistance to Modernism and abstraction in art as well as the beginning of "the painting witch hunt," in the words of art historian Peter Plagens.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By D.J. Waldie, For the Los Angeles Times
In September 1945, under a pall of ocher smog and summer heat, Los Angeles entered the postwar world. The city then was bigger, wealthier and more diverse than ever. Its established people — mostly past middle age and conservative, a few who were really rich — still had the narrowness of the Midwest towns from which many of them had come in the 1920s. The city's new people — Okies and Arkies, black Southerners, and white ethnics — had arrived with the war. Few of them had much interest in art. Of course, there was art in Los Angeles they could have seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2011 | By Jori Finkel and Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It seems worthy of an old-fashioned Hollywood epic, with a cast of thousands and a plot that spans four decades: "The Greatest Story Ever Told About Southern California Art. " Over the next six months, more than 60 museums and arts venues from Santa Barbara to San Diego will feature exhibitions of postwar Southern California art in an effort called Pacific Standard Time: Art in L.A. 1945-1980. Organizers believe it's the biggest museum collaboration ever. Every show tackles a different theme, such as the first wave of Chicano artists, the trailblazing feminists behind the Woman's Building, the pioneers of the so-called Light and Space movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2011 | By Holly Myers, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The story of Ed Kienholz's "Five Car Stud" has been something of a mystery for decades. Made in Los Angeles between 1969 and 1972, it was the last work Kienholz completed here before moving to Berlin and one of the most powerful by any measure: a searing indictment of race relations in America, told with a stroke of blunt violence as alarming today as it was the year it was made. The piece was shown, however, only in Germany before being acquired by a Japanese collector and disappearing into the vaults of the museum he would go on to found.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2008
I APPLAUD the Los Angeles County Museum of Art for making such a bold statement with its purchase of "The Illegal Operation" by Ed Kienholz ["LACMA Adds Kienholz but Not the Furor," by Suzanne Muchnic, Aug. 20]. In this political year, when Rowe vs. Wade is in danger of being overturned, it is so important that we keep our focus on issues that can effect all of us in one way or another. Through art we can tell this tale. And maybe "we have come along way, baby." Sherry J. Davis Los Angeles -- I FIND it somewhat risible that Ed Kienholz's work should be considered even vaguely controversial now. While sculptures like "Back Seat Dodge '38" and "The Illegal Operation" were shocking and bold within the context of their day, now they are interesting and quaint.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
When Ed Kienholz started making life-size tableaux back in the '60s, he staked out such a radical artistic position no one has caught up to him to this day. Kienholz was half philosopher and half attack-dog. He waded into the paradox and injustices of the American social myth when it was forbidden. Now that it's fashionable, other practitioners still look timid by comparison. Kienholz remains Kienholz's only competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1989 | Cathy Curtis
Diane and Igal Silber know when they've come upon a work of art they both want to buy. "We look at a piece, look at each other, and smile," says Igal Silver. The quote appears in a wall label in "Orange County Collects," a sprightly, unpretentious show at the Muckenthaler Cultural Center in Fullerton (through June 25). Rather than attempting to show the "best" art collected locally, the exhibit simply offers a trio of pieces from each of 18 private, corporate and museum collections representing vastly different sensibilities and budgets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There were predictions that heads would roll when the controversial artwork "Back Seat Dodge '38" went on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Thirty-three years later, it has finally happened. A museum docent has been fired for leading a group of fifth-grade girls from the Central California city of Visalia on a gallery tour that included artist Edward Kienholz's stylized depiction of a couple necking in the back of a car.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1996
Reminiscences and critical perspectives on the art of the late Ed Kienholz and his role in the local art scene will be offered during "Ed Kienholz Remembered," Nov. 2 at UCLA's Perloff Hall. The 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
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