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Ed Miliband

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WORLD
September 26, 2010 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Britain's Labor Party chose the younger of two brothers as its new leader Saturday, selecting Ed Miliband over his older sibling to lead the party back from its electoral drubbing this spring after 13 years in power. Miliband, 40, who served as secretary for energy and climate change in the government of former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, is the youngest leader in Labor Party history. After three other rivals were eliminated, he defeated his brother, David, the former foreign secretary who until recently was considered the favorite, by slightly more than one percentage point in balloting on the eve of the party's annual conference.
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WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - President Obama's decision to seek congressional approval for a military strike on Syria could open the door to another vote by the British Parliament, which rejected such intervention, senior officials here suggested Sunday. The delay before a possible strike as Obama makes his case to U.S. lawmakers could give their British counterparts time to consider new evidence pointing toward the Syrian government's culpability in gassing rebel-held neighborhoods in Damascus. “It opens a very important new opportunity,” Malcolm Rifkind, chairman of the parliamentary intelligence committee, told the BBC. Rifkind supports force as an option in responding to the Syrian government's alleged chemical attack.
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NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Michael McGough, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
American journalists of an Anglophilic bent often complain that debates in Britain's House of Commons put those in the U.S. Congress to shame. Actually, the Commons often showcases its own form of superficiality, as in the Kabuki theater of Prime Minister's Question Time. But Thursday's Commons debate over a possible attack on Syria was admirably substantive. Prime Minister David Cameron offered a crisp and nuanced defense of military action, acknowledging that, although there was strong evidence that the Syrian regime used chemical weapons, he couldn't point to a “one smoking piece of intelligence.” Labor Party leader Ed Miliband, who forced Cameron to delay a final vote on military action, was less impressive but drove home the point that a decision should await a report by U.N. weapons inspectors.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu and Kim Willsher
LONDON - President Obama's decision to seek congressional approval for a military strike on Syria could open the door to another vote by the British Parliament, which rejected such intervention, senior officials here suggested Sunday. French lawmakers also seized on Obama's decision as an argument for holding their own vote on armed intervention in Syria. The delay before a possible strike as Obama makes his case to U.S. lawmakers could give their British counterparts time to consider new evidence pointing toward the Syrian government's culpability in gassing rebel-held neighborhoods in Damascus.
WORLD
April 8, 2013 | By Henry Chu, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
LONDON - Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher is to be given a ceremonial funeral with military honors. The service will be held in St. Paul's Cathedral, an honor reserved for great figures of state. One of Thatcher's predecessors as leader of the Conservative Party, Winston Churchill, was also given a funeral in the cathedral. Thatcher died Monday at age 87 after several years of failing health. A statement issued by a close friend and former adviser said Britain's first female leader, nicknamed the “Iron Lady,” died after a stroke.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu and Kim Willsher
LONDON - President Obama's decision to seek congressional approval for a military strike on Syria could open the door to another vote by the British Parliament, which rejected such intervention, senior officials here suggested Sunday. French lawmakers also seized on Obama's decision as an argument for holding their own vote on armed intervention in Syria. The delay before a possible strike as Obama makes his case to U.S. lawmakers could give their British counterparts time to consider new evidence pointing toward the Syrian government's culpability in gassing rebel-held neighborhoods in Damascus.
WORLD
September 1, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - President Obama's decision to seek congressional approval for a military strike on Syria could open the door to another vote by the British Parliament, which rejected such intervention, senior officials here suggested Sunday. The delay before a possible strike as Obama makes his case to U.S. lawmakers could give their British counterparts time to consider new evidence pointing toward the Syrian government's culpability in gassing rebel-held neighborhoods in Damascus. “It opens a very important new opportunity,” Malcolm Rifkind, chairman of the parliamentary intelligence committee, told the BBC. Rifkind supports force as an option in responding to the Syrian government's alleged chemical attack.
WORLD
August 16, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
  Britain is in the middle of a "slow-motion moral collapse" that must be reversed if the country is to avoid a repeat of last week's riots across England, Prime Minister David Cameron said Monday as he promised tough new measures to crack down on lawlessness and promote a responsible society. But the opposition Labor Party warned against knee-jerk policies incapable of striking at the causes of the looting and violence, in a sign that the political unanimity seen in the riots' immediate aftermath is fraying as leaders grope for the best way to respond to what happened.
WORLD
August 10, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister David Cameron promised Wednesday that Britain would end the chaos caused by rioters who have looted and burned neighborhoods in London and other cities. Though London, where the trouble began late Saturday, was calming down, rioters took to the streets in cities such as Manchester and Birmingham, wrecking businesses and homes. In Birmingham, three young men who were guarding a neighborhood and its mosque were run down and killed by a driver suspected of being a rioter.
WORLD
March 27, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Tens of thousands of demonstrators whistled, chanted, drummed and marched their way through the heart of London on Saturday to protest massive government spending cuts that threaten to leave almost no part of British society untouched. It was one of the biggest public demonstrations in Britain since 2003, when antiwar rallies were held across the country before the invasion of Iraq. Organizers said up to 250,000 people participated in the march, whose carnival-like atmosphere was briefly marred by black-clad anarchists who smashed a few shop windows, flung paint bombs and attacked luxury icons such as the Ritz Hotel.
NEWS
August 29, 2013 | By Michael McGough, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
American journalists of an Anglophilic bent often complain that debates in Britain's House of Commons put those in the U.S. Congress to shame. Actually, the Commons often showcases its own form of superficiality, as in the Kabuki theater of Prime Minister's Question Time. But Thursday's Commons debate over a possible attack on Syria was admirably substantive. Prime Minister David Cameron offered a crisp and nuanced defense of military action, acknowledging that, although there was strong evidence that the Syrian regime used chemical weapons, he couldn't point to a “one smoking piece of intelligence.” Labor Party leader Ed Miliband, who forced Cameron to delay a final vote on military action, was less impressive but drove home the point that a decision should await a report by U.N. weapons inspectors.
WORLD
April 10, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- British lawmakers interrupted their Easter vacation Wednesday to pay tribute to former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who died Monday at 87. At a special session of the House of Commons, Prime Minister David Cameron called Thatcher "an extraordinary leader and an extraordinary woman" who rescued Britain from decline and “made our country great again.” "Those who grew up while she was in office … can sometimes fail to appreciate...
WORLD
April 8, 2013 | By Henry Chu, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
LONDON - Former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher is to be given a ceremonial funeral with military honors. The service will be held in St. Paul's Cathedral, an honor reserved for great figures of state. One of Thatcher's predecessors as leader of the Conservative Party, Winston Churchill, was also given a funeral in the cathedral. Thatcher died Monday at age 87 after several years of failing health. A statement issued by a close friend and former adviser said Britain's first female leader, nicknamed the “Iron Lady,” died after a stroke.
NEWS
July 26, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
LONDON -- In the midst of round-robin meetings with current and former leaders here Thursday, Mitt Romney praised the "unique relationship" between the United States and Britain -- and pledged to carry on their commitment to common values, world peace and building a stronger world economy.  "The world is a tumultuous and dangerous place," the unofficial Republican presidential nominee said just before meeting with Labor Party leader Ed Miliband....
BUSINESS
July 3, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK — British authorities turned up the heat on Barclays as its chairman, Marcus Agius, became the first big casualty of a scandal involving attempts to manipulate key interest rates. Agius' resignation Monday came as political and financial observers called for further resignations, starting with that of Bob Diamond, the bank's chief executive. Lloyds and the Royal Bank of Scotland were also among about 20 major Western banks that have come under investigation by U.S. and British authorities for allegedly trying to manipulate the London interbank offered rate, or LIBOR, a benchmark for interest rates on corporate and consumer loans.
WORLD
May 5, 2012 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
LONDON — It's another gold medal for BoJo. Boris Johnson won a second term as mayor of London on Friday in a marquee contest between two of Britain's biggest personalities to run the country's biggest city. Johnson's victory after a hard-fought, profanity-laced campaign guarantees that it will be his endearingly goofy face, framed by a perpetually awful haircut, that will welcome millions of spectators and athletes to the Summer Olympics here in the British capital, which kick off in less than three months.
BUSINESS
July 3, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel and Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK — British authorities turned up the heat on Barclays as its chairman, Marcus Agius, became the first big casualty of a scandal involving attempts to manipulate key interest rates. Agius' resignation Monday came as political and financial observers called for further resignations, starting with that of Bob Diamond, the bank's chief executive. Lloyds and the Royal Bank of Scotland were also among about 20 major Western banks that have come under investigation by U.S. and British authorities for allegedly trying to manipulate the London interbank offered rate, or LIBOR, a benchmark for interest rates on corporate and consumer loans.
WORLD
April 10, 2013 | By Janet Stobart
LONDON -- British lawmakers interrupted their Easter vacation Wednesday to pay tribute to former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who died Monday at 87. At a special session of the House of Commons, Prime Minister David Cameron called Thatcher "an extraordinary leader and an extraordinary woman" who rescued Britain from decline and “made our country great again.” "Those who grew up while she was in office … can sometimes fail to appreciate...
WORLD
August 16, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
  Britain is in the middle of a "slow-motion moral collapse" that must be reversed if the country is to avoid a repeat of last week's riots across England, Prime Minister David Cameron said Monday as he promised tough new measures to crack down on lawlessness and promote a responsible society. But the opposition Labor Party warned against knee-jerk policies incapable of striking at the causes of the looting and violence, in a sign that the political unanimity seen in the riots' immediate aftermath is fraying as leaders grope for the best way to respond to what happened.
WORLD
August 10, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Prime Minister David Cameron promised Wednesday that Britain would end the chaos caused by rioters who have looted and burned neighborhoods in London and other cities. Though London, where the trouble began late Saturday, was calming down, rioters took to the streets in cities such as Manchester and Birmingham, wrecking businesses and homes. In Birmingham, three young men who were guarding a neighborhood and its mosque were run down and killed by a driver suspected of being a rioter.
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