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Ed Pechous

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September 18, 1997 | MARC LACEY and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Her voice full of anger, a former White House National Security Council aide told a Senate investigating committee Wednesday that government officials pressured her to stop being "such a Girl Scout" and withdraw her strong opposition to a major Democratic donor's international business project.
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NEWS
September 18, 1997 | MARC LACEY and ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Her voice full of anger, a former White House National Security Council aide told a Senate investigating committee Wednesday that government officials pressured her to stop being "such a Girl Scout" and withdraw her strong opposition to a major Democratic donor's international business project.
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NEWS
October 25, 1995 | JAMES RISEN and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In espionage circles, Ed Pechous was nicknamed "The Poison Dwarf," a monicker FBI officials had derisively attached to the diminutive spy, some in the CIA say. But if Pechous seemed like a character torn from the pages of a John Le Carre spy novel, there was nothing fictional about his enormous influence within the shadowy intelligence world during the twilight of the Cold War.
NEWS
October 25, 1995 | JAMES RISEN and RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In espionage circles, Ed Pechous was nicknamed "The Poison Dwarf," a monicker FBI officials had derisively attached to the diminutive spy, some in the CIA say. But if Pechous seemed like a character torn from the pages of a John Le Carre spy novel, there was nothing fictional about his enormous influence within the shadowy intelligence world during the twilight of the Cold War.
NEWS
September 27, 1997 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Bob from the CIA" is how he is known to the world now, thanks to the flurry of unwanted publicity he has garnered as a result of the campaign fund-raising scandal.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | JAMES RISEN and ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A major Democratic Party donor met secretly in 1995 with top aides to Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin and discussed funneling $100 million into Yeltsin's 1996 presidential campaign in exchange for Russian support of his proposed oil pipeline through Central Asia, according to classified CIA documents, confidential congressional depositions and other sources. Roger Tamraz, who was also seeking U.S.
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