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Ed Rasky

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Rasky came home from school this week, dumped his books on the living room floor and headed out for a run. With muscular legs that could belong to a man 20 years younger, the 73-year-old ran two miles Wednesday and another two Thursday. On Friday, he rested. Come Sunday morning, the retired high school English teacher plans to step up to the starting line with more than 20,000 others for the 14th annual Los Angeles Marathon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1999 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Rasky came home from school this week, dumped his books on the living room floor and headed out for a run. With muscular legs that could belong to a man 20 years younger, the 73-year-old ran two miles Wednesday and another two Thursday. On Friday, he rested. Come Sunday morning, the retired high school English teacher plans to step up to the starting line with more than 20,000 others for the 14th annual Los Angeles Marathon.
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NEWS
July 12, 1992
I congratulate Gary Libman, the writer of a "Joyful Survivor" (June 25). What an inspiring story on Jacob Blitzstein, who pursued his dream and graduated high school at the age of 81. It took him 10 years and he succeeded in spite of stroke, two bouts of pneumonia, two pacemakers and the loss of his wife and two siblings. And with all this he does volunteer work at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. As an educator for 39 years, I am always looking for role models to help my students who are thinking of giving up. Jacob, you are on the top of my list.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001
Re "Board Narrowly OKs 15% Raises for Teachers," Feb. 28, and "L.A. Unified Reaches Deal With Officials on Pay Raises," March 8. Recently, the Los Angeles Board of Education voted 4 to 3 to raise teachers' salaries by 15%. Hallelujah! Isn't it about time? With many teachers quitting in their first four years, plus the terrible teacher shortage and the morale of teachers at an all-time low, this will give teachers a spiritual lift. As an English teacher with Los Angeles Unified School District for 36 years (retired '91)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001
My background is 45 years experience in teaching English and counseling students in the Los Angeles Unified School District. Why do we have shootings in schools? Latchkey kids hate to go home each day because there is no one there to talk to. They can't share their day or bond with anyone. It's these kids who join gangs, and the gang becomes their new family. Too many moms go back to work too soon after they have their children. A nursery school can't replace a mom. Some kids get on drugs and steal to keep up their habit.
OPINION
October 24, 1999
Your Oct. 19 editorial, "Zacarias Should Leave Quickly," doesn't really address the main problem. "He has not been able to change an unresponsive bureaucracy." As a 36-year educator of LAUSD, now retired, I say it can be changed. You must have someone in charge who doesn't just say that there are 100 schools on probation because management didn't do a good job. You can't fire teachers but you can fire management at all levels. My rough estimate is that 25% of all management should be replaced now. (I was an administrator for 10 years in the LAUSD.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
For 10 years, 69-year-old Ed Rasky has used his legs to raise money for children with cancer, soliciting pledges from friends and former colleagues while training to run in the Los Angeles Marathon. The retired high school English teacher pulls himself out of bed six mornings a week to jog his routine eight-mile route through the sleepy streets of West Hills. He has raised an average of $5,000 a year for Camp Ronald McDonald for Good Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1985
Hayden said a mouthful in his article when he stated, "Good teachers are the key to good schools, and good education is the basis of a healthy economy, cultural tolerance and meaningful democracy. We must restore the importance of teaching." Hayden left out one important facet of restoring the importance of teaching and that is the fading respect for teachers in Los Angeles. Hayden talks of incentives to attract a larger pool of young people to the field and working conditions that will hold teachers on the job instead of driving them out. Let's take a look at the incentives.
TRAVEL
November 8, 1987
I write in the hope that it will assist other Americans who may be thinking of traveling to Spain. Last summer my wife and I, both wearing money belts, had just left the Plaza de Mayor in Madrid about 1:30 p.m. Two young men about 18 years of age came up behind me and gave me a push forward. Another young Spaniard was trying to take my wife's purse, dragging her and she wouldn't let go. I was still being pushed ahead and didn't see everything. The thief working on my wife slashed the purse straps and then stabbed her in the elbow area, grabbed her purse and started to run. I'm 62 but have run seven marathons, so took after the thieves for four blocks, shouting, "Police!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990
Your editorial "Escalante's Defeat Amid Triumph" Feb. 23 really sums up the expressed frustration that teachers have had with the educational bureaucracy for years. Jaime Escalante has been fighting against the windmills like a Don Quixote for years. He has made the impossible dream for the Latinos at Garfield High a reality. Many of them are not quitting school but they are going on to college at a great success rate. Jaime Escalante, I am not jealous of you; I admire you for what you've done.
OPINION
May 4, 2003
Re "Bush Hails Victory in Iraq," May 2: How long will the American people allow the government to lie to them? In declaring an end to major hostilities in Iraq, President Bush cynically played on the emotion of the Sept. 11 attacks by once again citing a link between Al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein. Never mind that Osama bin Laden had encouraged Iraqis to rise up against Hussein and his secular government. If it can be used to manipulate the masses, Bush is not beneath telling the same lie so many times that some people just start to accept it. Now those in the majority Shiite Muslim community that Hussein kept down with force are rising up to declare their desire for a Muslim government, just as many experts predicted before Bush's ill-advised war. That's just what we need, another fundamentalist government in the Middle East that probably will give support and funding to Al Qaeda -- unlike Hussein, who was No. 2 on its hit list, behind us. Patrick Mallon San Luis Obispo I don't know if President Bush intended to change American foreign policy or not. We used to always wait till we were attacked before we responded.
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