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Ed Roski

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NEWS
April 15, 1999 | T.J. SIMERS and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hollywood agent Michael Ovitz said Wednesday that he and his partners will drop their bid to win a National Football League franchise for Carson and shift their attention to the New Coliseum project, which the NFL would like to see expanded to include a new stadium for the Dodgers. "If it's the Coliseum--great," said Ovitz. "The Dodger situation sounds like a great opportunity for the city, and that didn't exist a month ago.
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SPORTS
October 9, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
As far as the NFL and Los Angeles go, all is quiet on the Western front. Or maybe we just need to look more closely. The leading location remains AEG's downtown Farmers Field. Phil Anschutz's exclusive bargaining window is open until November 2014. It is "shovel-ready," as developers say. Money is in the bank. Entitlements have been taken care of. AEG is an owner-landlord in waiting. It is a quieter effort now, since Tim Leiweke left AEG. He was effective, hard-charging, persuasive, but never quiet.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Back when legendary football coach John McKay and his assistant Al Davis were at USC, a stocky, crew-cut freshman named Ed Roski Jr. tried hard to get their attention. Day after day, Roski jumped onto the field as one of the red-shirted linemen--the wannabes who routinely took a beating from the traveling team on the slim hope of making the roster. Bull-strong as he was, the 5-foot-9-inch Roski never made it.
SPORTS
September 30, 2012 | By Helene Elliott
The Stanley Cup made its first public appearance Saturday since the Kings' names were inscribed on it, and the updated trophy contained a surprise. The name of club co-owner Ed Roski, omitted from the original list submitted to the NHL and the Hockey Hall of Fame, is on the top line following the names of owner Phil Anschutz, Anschutz's wife, Nancy, and Tim Leiweke, head of the Kings' parent company. That gave the Kings 53 names on the Cup, one above the limit, but Roski's ownership role was considered important enough for the league to add his name.
SPORTS
February 20, 1999
Having been a chronic critic of T.J. Simers, I want to take this opportunity to congratulate him on an excellent and mostly accurate article ["NFL Favors Coliseum" Feb. 17]. The $5-million provision does not call for payment by the Coliseum Commission, only that it be required by a third party to be paid if, and only if, a team in which Ed Roski is not involved actually plays in a renovated Coliseum. The message here is simple. Roski is spending millions to try to get the team, and if the Coliseum makes a deal with someone else, he gets his money back from that someone else, even if it is the NFL. In that case, the Coliseum--and L.A.--still gets a team.
OPINION
October 17, 1999
Frank del Olmo (Commentary, Oct. 10) astutely notes that the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is alive and well and financially viable, even without NFL football, and serves as a focal point for the renaissance of the entire Exposition Park campus. The return of NFL football under the appropriate terms would be beneficial to L.A., to the Coliseum and to the neighborhood. It is unfortunate that the NFL has been unable to find a way to bring professional football back to Los Angeles. When it does, the Coliseum remains the best possible place to put a team.
OPINION
November 4, 2009
Re "Political football," Opinion, Oct. 29 Unlike Sen. Alan Lowenthal (D-Long Beach), I hate football. That does not stop me from agreeing with his criticism of bypassing California's environmental laws to build the City of Industry stadium. Why, we ask, is Ed Roski not required to play by the rules? Perhaps when his team gets on the field, they will be allowed touchdowns on crossing the 10-yard line. Then again, maybe he is playing by the rules -- the new rules after the California Environmental Quality Act has been bypassed into irrelevancy.
SPORTS
January 21, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Responding to renewed rumors that the Kings are on the market, Tim Leiweke, chairman and chief executive of the club's parent company AEG, said the hockey team has not been put up for sale. "We get calls all the time. We are neither looking at [nor] in talks to sell," Leiweke said in an e-mail Friday. "Very focused on NFL. " AEG, which used its purchase of the Kings in 1995 as a steppingstone to build a real estate and entertainment empire that includes Staples Center and a part interest in the Lakers, has proposed to build and finance a stadium in downtown Los Angeles that would house an NFL team.
SPORTS
December 30, 2008 | BILL DWYRE
Somewhere on Sunday, Ed Roski was watching and drooling. He knew that what he was seeing, on a super Sunday of NFL competition, was what he wants for his city of Los Angeles. All but a handful of the games had a bearing on the playoffs. There were more permutations than a slot machine. If you were a Philadelphia Eagles fan, you lived and died with what was happening in Tampa and Minneapolis. If you were a New England Patriots fan, your heart pounded fast for the New York Jets over Miami.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | JIM NEWTON and T.J. SIMERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a letter to the National Football League, Los Angeles officials tried Thursday to reassure the league that a disputed contract provision that troubles some team owners will not stand in the way of bringing football back to the city. A source with the league, however, said that while the letter helped clarify some issues, it did not resolve the concerns.
SPORTS
October 12, 2011 | T.J. Simers
What a farce, and so right away you know I'm referring to the NFL and its chances of returning to L.A. Developments, as reported by our NFL expert Sam Farmer the past few days, are laughable, but a reminder once again of the NFL's arrogance. Yes, we're back to the old days when the NFL maintained L.A. needed it more than the NFL needed L.A., and 17 years later it sounds more ridiculous than when first mentioned. The NFL never has understood the L.A. market. Folks here are willing to spend big money to be seen in a new stadium as long as the team inside is winning and they don't have to read about all the nonsense leading up to stadium construction and the acquisition of a team.
SPORTS
October 11, 2011 | Sam Farmer
Reporting from Houston — The NFL stadium derby in Southern California is likely to get more interesting and competitive. Real estate magnate Ed Roski, whose bid for a stadium in City of Industry has for months been lost in the shadows of a rival proposal next to Staples Center, has changed his offer to teams eyeing a relocation. Roski has dropped his demand for a no-cash minority share of a franchise and instead is offering to hand over the 600 acres he controls to any team that relocates there.
SPORTS
August 12, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
The big headlines and media noise swirling around the proposed downtown stadium have given new life to the nearly forgotten concept that the NFL might have a team in Los Angeles again. One thing is certain. Tim Leiweke and his Anschutz Entertainment Group have won the battle of perception. The only way Leiweke could have made a bigger splash would have been to don a Paul Revere hat and ride through the streets of Los Angeles, yelling: "The NFL is coming! The NFL is coming!" The implication of his proposed site, next to Staples Center, is that it would make L.A. Live even livelier.
SPORTS
June 29, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
The battle of NFL proposals has taken another interesting turn. AEG, pushing for a downtown stadium, announced Wednesday that it has selected Populous as the architectural firm to design the relocated West Hall of the Convention Center, which sits on the proposed site of Farmers Field. A senior principal at Populous is Staples Center architect Dan Meis, who designed Ed Roski's proposed City of Industry stadium. Populous, a global firm with offices worldwide, including a Los Angeles office, now will turn its attention solely to the downtown site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 2011 | By Shane Goldmacher, Los Angeles Times
State Sen. Bob Huff, who is working aggressively to save California's redevelopment agencies, says Gov. Jerry Brown's plan to abolish them is legally dubious, would cost jobs and would eliminate one of the state's few tools for spurring economic development. What the Diamond Bar Republican doesn't include in his pitch is that his wife is a paid consultant for a large developer eager to keep the program intact. The developer, Ed Roski Jr., owner of Majestic Realty, has industrial and commercial properties across Southern California, many of them in redevelopment zones that have been spruced up with tax dollars.
SPORTS
February 7, 2011 | By Sam Farmer
Even though his competition in downtown Los Angeles has landed a record-setting deal for naming rights ? and the quiet favor of many NFL owners and executives ? real estate magnate Ed Roski is far from losing hope on his stadium concept in City of Industry. Roski still thinks his plan is the best option to bring the NFL back to the L.A. area, and says he has no intention of ever throwing his weight behind the competing project, proposed for a site next to Staples Center. "No way," he said over breakfast in Dallas, where Sunday he attended the Super Bowl in neighboring Arlington.
OPINION
August 31, 1997
If you are wondering why business people are proceeding to build a new high-rise building in Glendale, but none are planned for downtown Los Angeles, read Bill Boyarsky's Aug. 25 column! There is no excuse for Boyarsky's diatribe against Phil Anschutz and Ed Roski. We should be appreciative of their efforts to bring an arena to downtown Los Angeles. The fact that they are more business oriented than political is, to me, a plus (but apparently not to a political writer). Also, Boyarsky would do well to revisit the Dodgers' history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1999 | TIM RUTTEN and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Property developer Ed Roski and his New Coliseum Venture partners are pressing members of the Coliseum Commission to approve a confidential memorandum of understanding that would give them the historic facility rent-free for a period of time, and then charge them just $1.5 million annually after that. Under the terms outlined in the memo, a copy of which has been obtained by The Times, the commission would let Roski and his partners have the property free while they renovate the stadium.
SPORTS
January 21, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Responding to renewed rumors that the Kings are on the market, Tim Leiweke, chairman and chief executive of the club's parent company AEG, said the hockey team has not been put up for sale. "We get calls all the time. We are neither looking at [nor] in talks to sell," Leiweke said in an e-mail Friday. "Very focused on NFL. " AEG, which used its purchase of the Kings in 1995 as a steppingstone to build a real estate and entertainment empire that includes Staples Center and a part interest in the Lakers, has proposed to build and finance a stadium in downtown Los Angeles that would house an NFL team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy
Ed Roski Jr., the L.A. County billionaire who got state legislators to exempt his proposed NFL stadium from environmental laws, has showered the lawmakers with tens of thousands of dollars in campaign cash. The money is part of $505,000 that Roski put into California political campaigns during the second half of 2009, including $300,000 toward a proposed ballot measure that would change term limits for future legislators. The contributions are significantly higher than in the previous six months, when Roski doled out $49,000.
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