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Ed Ruscha

ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
"I never aspired to be a photographer," says artist Edward Ruscha. "To this day, I'm still not a photographer." Yet here he is, in a tony Southern California gallery -- Gagosian in Beverly Hills -- with a big show of his photographs, taken over the past 40 years. A painter with a Pop sensibility who is often identified as L.A.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
Los Angeles-based artist Edward Ruscha has been named the U.S. representative at the 2005 Venice Biennale. A selection of his work, yet to be determined, will fill the American pavilion when the show opens in June. Ruscha was chosen by directors and curators from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic
In keeping with its practice of enlisting artists as advisors and decision makers, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles has elected Edward Ruscha to its board of trustees. A world-renowned figure who has 33 works in MOCA's permanent collection, Ruscha is also well represented at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, which recently announced its acquisition of 156 of his prints.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
Three months after Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art acquired Edward Ruscha's "Chocolate Room," a conceptual installation that covers walls of an entire room with shingle-like sheets of chocolate-coated paper, New York's Whitney Museum of American Art has received a gift of 456 photographs and prints by the L.A.-based artist. The donation, announced Friday, makes the Whitney the principal repository of Ruscha's photographic works.
HOME & GARDEN
October 30, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Artist Ed Ruscha and his wife, Danna, have sold their Point Dume-area home in Malibu for $4 million. The 1-acre estate includes a gated, one-story ranch-style home that had been updated and two guesthouses. The main house has open-plan living and dining rooms, a breakfast area in the kitchen, an office, a family room and three bedrooms. The master suite opens to a swimming pool with spa. Extensive windows and French doors give the house an indoor-outdoor feel. The primary guesthouse contains two bedrooms and a living room with a fireplace.
HOME & GARDEN
October 19, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Artist Ed Ruscha has sold his Point Dume-area home in Malibu for $4 million, the Multiple Listing Service shows. The acre estate includes a gated, one-story, ranch-style home that had been updated, two guesthouses and a swimming pool with spa. The main house has open plan living and dining rooms, a breakfast area in the kitchen, an office, a family room and three bedrooms. The master suite opens to the pool. Extensive windows and French doors give the house an indoor-outdoor feel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Nicolas Berggruen travels more in three months than most people do in a lifetime. Dubbed "the homeless billionaire" because he prefers living out of five-star hotels to owning any homes, his business and nonprofit ventures this winter alone have taken him to Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Beijing, New Delhi and Zurich, with a side trip to Antarctica. So it's not entirely surprising to learn that Berggruen, who owns a Gulfstream IV, is not big on cars. "I can drive," said the energetic, boyish-looking 50-year-old.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
SOMEWHERE between a dorm-room poster of Monet's waterlilies and the Robert Rauschenberg painting owned by Eli Broad is another level -- the beginnings of an art collection that can be built by anyone with a few grand to spend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2011 | By Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Even for legendary decades of change, the 1960s stands out, its impact felt around the world but especially in the Los Angeles art world. The '60s is the point when a number of factors converged that would transform L.A. from just another place that ambitious artists left when they moved to New York into a distinct and thriving art scene in its own right. At midcentury, as World War II was fading from immediate memory, the art associated with that traumatic period, Abstract Expressionism, had become the powerful and entrenched aesthetic.
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