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Ed Zschau

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NEWS
November 26, 1985 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
He has a name few Californians have ever heard--or can even pronounce. But on Monday, Rep. Ed Zschau (say it like "shout" but without the "t") of Los Altos entered the Republican race for the U.S. Senate in 1986, bringing with him a $1-million war chest and the potential for heating up what has been a crowded but lackluster Senate primary.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO Sixteen years ago, U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston was running for reelection and was uncontested in the Democratic primary. Same as Gov. Gray Davis today. Cranston was a ferocious fund-raiser and had campaign money to burn. Like Davis. The Republicans had a bruising primary contest to nominate their candidate. Like now. And there was one potential GOP nominee--a moderate--who particularly worried the Democratic incumbent. As there is today. This year, Davis clearly has studied and adopted the late senator's then-novel strategy, while altering the playbook to fit his own situation.
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OPINION
October 12, 1986 | Joel Kotkin and Greg Critser, Joel Kotkin is West Coast editor for Inc.; Greg Critser is the magazine's Los Angeles contributing editor.
When he captured the GOP nomination last spring, Rep. Ed Zschau seemed to embody a new and appealing brand of progressive Republicanism. Zschau's candidacy rallied to Republican ranks a generation of well-heeled entrepreneurs and baby boomers previously uncommitted. Equally important, Zschau's high-tech roots gave Republicans a unique opportunity to identify with forces shaping the nation's industrial future.
NEWS
August 6, 1996 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Reform Party presidential contender Richard D. Lamm on Monday accused Ross Perot of skewing the party's nominating process in his own favor and argued that the political movement started by the Texas billionaire needs to replace him if it is to thrive. Campaigning in Northern California with his newly chosen running mate, former U.S. Rep. Ed Zschau of Los Altos, Lamm said he does not think Perot is trying "to steal this election."
NEWS
September 7, 1986 | JOHN BALZAR, Times Political Writer
No celebrity candidate was there to beguile them, and no veteran rallied them. So California Republicans played a hunch on a tenderfoot who intrigued them, and nominated Ed Who?--Ed Zschau for the U.S. Senate. He was fresh and vital and enthusiastic. Everyone could see that. He delivered a knowing pitch for the freedom to pursue wealth and live quietly without government supervision. He was a university professor, an entrepreneur and elected to Congress.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
Some of Ed Zschau's admirers say he's a conservative. His critics say he's a liberal. But in fact, this entrepreneur-turned-politician is neither. By his own admission, Zschau, a two-term Republican congressman from the Silicon Valley, falls into a group described in recent writings as "the new libertarians."
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In the scientific wonderland of Silicon Valley, where big things are being made smaller and smaller, Ed Zschau is holding a tiny sliver of metal tipped with a device that just might be a high-tech breakthrough. It is so phenomenally small that its parts are measured by the width of an atom. But it is so big, Zschau says, that there is no way he could ignore it and instead make a second try at the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
October 31, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
The Wolfman is mad. And he says to Alan Cranston, "I'm gonna getcha." It all started when Robert Shrum and David Doak, who make TV commercials for Democratic Sen. Cranston's reelection campaign, were looking for one more ad to draw attention to the inconsistent stands that Cranston's Republican opponent, Rep. Ed Zschau, has taken on some issues. Why not "Ed Zschau's greatest flip-flops?" they mused as they brainstormed late one night in Washington.
NEWS
June 11, 1986
Republican U. S. Senate candidate Ed Zschau asked television network outlets in the Los Angeles, San Francisco and Sacramento media markets to sponsor a series of debates between Zschau and Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston. Zschau press secretary Sandra Conlan said the campaign wants a statewide hookup on each debate so that network affiliates in the three areas would carry the event simultaneously. Cranston press secretary Kam Kuwata said, "We are still waiting for Mr.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Former California Rep. Ed Zschau, a moderate Republican and high-tech entrepreneur, is Reform Party presidential candidate Richard D. Lamm's choice for a running mate. In a telephone interview from his home here Friday, Lamm would not elaborate on the reasons behind his selection in advance of a formal announcement Monday. Lamm is running for the Reform Party nomination against party founder and funder Ross Perot. Perot has not chosen a running mate.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | Associated Press
Former California Rep. Ed Zschau, a moderate Republican and high-tech entrepreneur, is Reform Party presidential candidate Richard D. Lamm's choice for a running mate. In a telephone interview from his home here Friday, Lamm would not elaborate on the reasons behind his selection in advance of a formal announcement Monday. Lamm is running for the Reform Party nomination against party founder and funder Ross Perot. Perot has not chosen a running mate.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Zschau Leaving IBM: Zschau, 55, who has run IBM's disk storage business for more than two years, will pursue new ventures in public policy and higher education. Zschau, who represented the San Francisco Bay Area for two terms in Congress, said he will announce specific plans in coming months but that he has no plans to run for office. Zschau, a moderate Republican, nearly unseated Democratic U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston in 1986. IBM said James T.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1993 | Jonathan Weber
Ed Zschau, a computer entrepreneur-turned-politician who served two terms in the House of Representatives and made an unsuccesful run for the U.S. Senate in 1986, is returning to his roots. He's been hired to run Adstar, IBM's $6-billion, San Jose-based disk-drive business. Adstar is being spun off as a wholly owned IBM subsidiary. Zschau, who is 53 years old, founded the Silicon Valley data-storage company Systems Industries in 1968.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
In the scientific wonderland of Silicon Valley, where big things are being made smaller and smaller, Ed Zschau is holding a tiny sliver of metal tipped with a device that just might be a high-tech breakthrough. It is so phenomenally small that its parts are measured by the width of an atom. But it is so big, Zschau says, that there is no way he could ignore it and instead make a second try at the U.S. Senate.
NEWS
November 18, 1991 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Ed Zschau, former congressman from the Silicon Valley, said Sunday that moderate Republicans must dramatically reshape their image and agenda to overcome a perception that they are "squishy" and lacking in zeal, in principle and in compassion for people. Addressing the California Republican League, a volunteer organization of GOP moderates and progressives, Zschau said members must become "flaming moderates."
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Rep. Ed Zschau, a Republican moderate widely viewed as a repeat contender for the U.S. Senate after his narrow loss to Sen. Alan Cranston in 1986, said Friday that he has decided not to run in next year's election. Zschau said he explored the possibility of running for Cranston's Senate seat over the last several months and concluded that although the race was winnable, it would be too disruptive to the Silicon Valley computer company he has headed for about two years.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ed Zschau Leaving IBM: Zschau, 55, who has run IBM's disk storage business for more than two years, will pursue new ventures in public policy and higher education. Zschau, who represented the San Francisco Bay Area for two terms in Congress, said he will announce specific plans in coming months but that he has no plans to run for office. Zschau, a moderate Republican, nearly unseated Democratic U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston in 1986. IBM said James T.
NEWS
May 4, 1990 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles businessman Michael R. Goland, a major pro-Israel contributor to political campaigns, was convicted in federal court Thursday on one misdemeanor count of making an illegal donation designed to help the 1986 reelection bid of Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.). But at the same time, Goland, 43, was acquitted on four other counts of conspiracy and making false statements, and the jury deadlocked on a felony false-statement count.
NEWS
September 21, 1989
A Chatsworth businessman whose trial on election fraud charges ended in a deadlocked jury earlier this year was named this week in a new federal grand jury indictment in Los Angeles. Michael Goland, 42, was accused of trying to help reelect Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) by illegally donating $150,000 to American Independent Party candidate Ed Vallen in hopes of drawing votes from Cranston's 1986 Republican opponent, Ed Zschau.
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