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Eddie Adams

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Eddie Adams, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of a Vietnamese general executing a Viet Cong prisoner in the streets of Saigon became an enduring symbol of the brutality of the Vietnam War, died Sunday in his Manhattan home. He was 71. Adams died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, his assistant, Jessica Stuart, told Associated Press.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Eddie Adams made me weep long before I knew his name. With his camera he caught the faces of the Vietnam War: soldiers hardened too young, barefoot children with dead eyes, burned villages with smoke still hanging in the air, mothers collapsed around their dead. His photos seared the front pages of newspapers around the world, making the war painfully real.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
The ceremony was always emotional on his farm in upstate New York, where the names of fallen Vietnam War photographers were carved into a stone monument. Eddie Adams had known all of them, and every October he would raise a champagne glass with more than 100 colleagues and students to remember the sacrifices and pictures that once brought the war home to Americans. Adams won a Pulitzer Prize for taking one of the most notorious photographs of the war, capturing the horrific moment when a South Vietnamese lieutenant colonel executed a Viet Cong prisoner on the streets of Saigon in 1968.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
The ceremony was always emotional on his farm in upstate New York, where the names of fallen Vietnam War photographers were carved into a stone monument. Eddie Adams had known all of them, and every October he would raise a champagne glass with more than 100 colleagues and students to remember the sacrifices and pictures that once brought the war home to Americans. Adams won a Pulitzer Prize for taking one of the most notorious photographs of the war, capturing the horrific moment when a South Vietnamese lieutenant colonel executed a Viet Cong prisoner on the streets of Saigon in 1968.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
Eddie Adams, the late Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist known for his emblematic images of the Vietnam War, was remembered Thursday for his wry smile and bright eyes that revealed an endless passion for telling the stories of humanity. Adams, best known for his Associated Press photo of a communist guerrilla being executed in a Saigon street, died last month at 71 from complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2009 | BETSY SHARKEY, FILM CRITIC
Eddie Adams made me weep long before I knew his name. With his camera he caught the faces of the Vietnam War: soldiers hardened too young, barefoot children with dead eyes, burned villages with smoke still hanging in the air, mothers collapsed around their dead. His photos seared the front pages of newspapers around the world, making the war painfully real.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | Associated Press
Nguyen Ngoc Loan, the South Vietnamese general whose summary execution of a bound prisoner was depicted in a photograph that stunned the world three decades ago, has died. He was 67. Loan died Tuesday night at his home in Burke, a suburb of Washington, after a battle with cancer, said his daughter, Nguyen Anh. The photo of Loan firing a pistol point-blank at the grimacing prisoner's head on Feb. 1, 1968, became a haunting image of the Vietnam War.
NEWS
January 8, 1986
A Compton man has been sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole in the 1985 slaying of Compton grocer Eddie Warren Adams. Leon Watts, 19, who was free on his own recognizance pending sentencing on kidnaping charges at the time of the Adams murder, struck the owner of the A & A Meat Co. on the back of the head with a baseball bat during a robbery. Adams, trial testimony showed, had known the young assailant since Watts was an infant and was caught off guard by the attack.
NEWS
August 17, 2000
"I'm really sad that my party is not standing up to stop these sanctions in Iraq that are killing children. I'm not sure I'm going to vote for my party." MARY BERNIER, Quit her job four times to work for the Democratic Party * "Being the first Orthodox Jew on a ticket, do you think it opens up doors for other minorities?" AARON GRANT, 12, student reporter for Scholastic News, sharing the question he asked Joseph I.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2004 | From Associated Press
Eddie Adams, the late Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist known for his emblematic images of the Vietnam War, was remembered Thursday for his wry smile and bright eyes that revealed an endless passion for telling the stories of humanity. Adams, best known for his Associated Press photo of a communist guerrilla being executed in a Saigon street, died last month at 71 from complications of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2004 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Eddie Adams, whose Pulitzer Prize-winning photo of a Vietnamese general executing a Viet Cong prisoner in the streets of Saigon became an enduring symbol of the brutality of the Vietnam War, died Sunday in his Manhattan home. He was 71. Adams died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, known as Lou Gehrig's disease, his assistant, Jessica Stuart, told Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2007 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The J. Paul Getty Museum, best known for its contested antiquities, Impressionist irises and gorgeous grounds, has been diversifying in gruesome black and white. Since 2003, the museum has bought up several photographic prints that count among the 20th century's most iconic journalistic images of death by violence: Malcolm Browne's picture of the 1963 self-immolation of a Vietnamese Buddhist monk; a print from the Zapruder film of the 1963 shooting of John F.
OPINION
August 1, 2006
Re "Israel to Halt Bombing for 48 Hours," July 31 Looking at history, this is yet another repeat of the withdrawal from Lebanon six years ago and the withdrawal from Gaza a year ago. Both led directly to terror because they were not met on the Arab side with a commitment to end terror. How many more withdrawals does Israel have to carry out before the world realizes that the only way to bring peace is a two-sided commitment to peace? How many flare-ups does the world need to see before we admit the real problem, the lack of commitment to peace on the part of the Arab countries?
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