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Eddie Dean

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March 5, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Dean, one of the last singing cowboy stars of the 1940s, died Thursday of heart and lung disease in Thousand Oaks. He was 91. Known as the golden-throated cowboy for an exceptionally melodious voice, Dean appeared in more than 30 Western movies starting in 1936. In the 1940s he was among the 10 most popular cowboy stars and was the first singing cowboy to do movies in color.
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NEWS
March 5, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Dean, one of the last singing cowboy stars of the 1940s, died Thursday of heart and lung disease in Thousand Oaks. He was 91. Known as the golden-throated cowboy for an exceptionally melodious voice, Dean appeared in more than 30 Western movies starting in 1936. In the 1940s he was among the 10 most popular cowboy stars and was the first singing cowboy to do movies in color.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Saddle Up: The Gene Autry Western Heritage Museum has corralled country music stars Emmylou Harris, Clint Black and Dwight Yoakam to perform at a May 16 celebrity concert and tribute dinner honoring legendary singing cowboys. Among the honorees: Roy Rogers, Dale Evans, Patsy Montana, Monte Hale, Rex Allen, Eddie Dean, Herb Jeffries, the Sons of the Pioneers and Autry. Actor Dennis Weaver will emcee the evening, which is part of a "Music of the West" festival taking place May 15-17 at the museum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
A stream of fans and well-wishers greeted singing cowboy Eddie Dean at a Saturday fund-raiser organized to help buy the actor a star on the Palm Springs Walk of Fame. Dean, 91, graciously received the guests, even when they came over more than once to introduce friends and relatives. More than 100 people showed up for the event at the Iverson movie ranch, which featured food, country music, and vendors selling T-shirts, singing cowboy posters and other memorabilia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
A stream of fans and well-wishers greeted singing cowboy Eddie Dean at a Saturday fund-raiser organized to help buy the actor a star on the Palm Springs Walk of Fame. Dean, 91, graciously received the guests, even when they came over more than once to introduce friends and relatives. More than 100 people showed up for the event at the Iverson movie ranch, which featured food, country music, and vendors selling T-shirts, singing cowboy posters and other memorabilia.
NEWS
May 14, 1992 | ANNE KLARNER
There may be those among the younger generation who know Gene Autry only as the long-suffering owner of the California Angels. But there also are those who know him as the first to record that all-time fave "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" (1949), and one of the leading singing cowboys of film.
NEWS
November 21, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
J.D. Sumner, Grammy Award-winning gospel singer known for his work with the Stamps Quartet, a backup group for Elvis Presley, has died. He was 73. Sumner, who was inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame in 1983, died Monday of a heart attack in Myrtle Beach, S.C., where he had gone to perform with the Stamps. J.D. Sumner and the Stamps, as they were known, performed with Presley from 1970 to 1977, and Sumner sang at Presley's funeral in 1977.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2000 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Doug Field's "Down South," at the Flight Theatre, is set in a comfy suburb of Erie, Pa., at the height of the Cuban missile crisis. Don't jump to any conclusions--despite the backdrop of looming nuclear disaster, this is madcap comedy of the silliest order. The "south" of the title isn't just a geographical reference. It's anatomical, a wink-wink, nudge-nudge allusion to those "naughty bits"--as Monty Python referred to them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1986 | LYNN SIMROSS, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood officially begins its centennial celebration Sunday when 100 film, television and recording stars join in a salute to the film capital during the Hollywood Christmas Parade. Heading the lengthy list of stars are Jimmy Stewart, parade grand marshal in 1977, and first-time participant Stevie Wonder. A less traditional parade, the Doo Dah Parade in Pasadena, will step off Sunday at noon from Fair Oaks Avenue and Union Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1985 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Tommy Thomas--a nightclub owner who led country music artists to fame on his stage--led friends in a final tribute to him Friday at his Palomino club. A 1 1/2-mile-long funeral procession followed the hearse carrying Thomas' body as it detoured through North Hollywood to pass slowly by his famous Lankershim Boulevard nightclub on the way to graveside services in Mission Hills. Thomas died of a heart attack at the age of 61 on Sunday.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Leo Fender, the back-yard inventor who created an electric guitar made famous by some of rock and roll's biggest names, was remembered in a memorial service Saturday by some of the artists and music fans touched by his craft. "Probably the best tribute we can give is the sound of his instruments," John Jorgenson, guitarist for the country rock band Desert Rose, said about the 81-year-old inventor who died March 21 from complications of Parkinson's disease.
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