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Eddie Futch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boxing trainer Eddie Futch, teacher of champion fighters and a respected figure in an often seamy sport for seven decades, died Wednesday morning in Las Vegas. He was 90. The Clark County coroner's office would divulge no more details pending a further examination today. "In a business riddled with politics and intrigue," said promoter Bob Arum, "Eddie never got involved in any of that. He always appeared to be above it. You won't find anybody who has anything bad to say about him.
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SPORTS
January 19, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Freddie Roach was on track to marry his high school sweetheart and become an arborist caring for ornamental trees. "I chose to become a prizefighter instead," Roach said last week while standing in a ring corner of his Wild Card Boxing Club in Hollywood as a fighter sparred. "I got a plane ticket to Vegas instead, and here we are. " Where he is now is the subject of a new reality series from director Peter Berg ("Friday Night Lights") that will debut Friday on HBO; titled, "On Freddie Roach," it's a six-part series co-produced by HBO boxing commentator Jim Lampley.
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SPORTS
January 26, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Eddie Futch, 81-year-old trainer of heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe, was hospitalized for treatment of a heart problem in Scotrun, Pa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2001 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boxing trainer Eddie Futch, teacher of champion fighters and a respected figure in an often seamy sport for seven decades, died Wednesday morning in Las Vegas. He was 90. The Clark County coroner's office would divulge no more details pending a further examination today. "In a business riddled with politics and intrigue," said promoter Bob Arum, "Eddie never got involved in any of that. He always appeared to be above it. You won't find anybody who has anything bad to say about him.
SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | From Times wire services
Legendary boxer Sugar Ray Robinson "personified class, style and dignity," heavyweight champ Mike Tyson told more than 2,300 mourners who filled a Los Angeles church today for the five-time middleweight champion's funeral. Memories of Robinson, who died last week at age 67, so moved Tyson that his voice choked and he apologized to the throng filling the West Angeles Church of God in Christ. "I had the privilege of meeting Sugar Ray," Tyson said. "Sugar Ray Robinson personified class, style and dignity."
SPORTS
January 19, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
Freddie Roach was on track to marry his high school sweetheart and become an arborist caring for ornamental trees. "I chose to become a prizefighter instead," Roach said last week while standing in a ring corner of his Wild Card Boxing Club in Hollywood as a fighter sparred. "I got a plane ticket to Vegas instead, and here we are. " Where he is now is the subject of a new reality series from director Peter Berg ("Friday Night Lights") that will debut Friday on HBO; titled, "On Freddie Roach," it's a six-part series co-produced by HBO boxing commentator Jim Lampley.
SPORTS
January 23, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
The moment Matt Zelen dived into the pool to start the 100-yard butterfly, he knew he had forgotten something. He had not tied his racing suit. When the St. John's junior felt his suit sliding off during an invitational meet, he decided to kick it off and finish the race. Zelen would have won by more than two seconds, except that he was disqualified for violating a uniform code. "It was hilarious, but it's too bad so many people were there," Zelen said.
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | ALLAN MALAMUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the past 36 years, the Futch touch has been applied to 17 world boxing champions. Eddie Futch, the trainer who will turn 81 next month, firmly believes the list soon will grow to 18. If Riddick Bowe defeats Pierre Coetzer, as expected, in a scheduled 12-round elimination bout tonight at the Grand Ballroom of the Mirage hotel, he will challenge heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield on Nov. 13. "I said two years ago that Bowe could beat Holyfield then," Futch said.
SPORTS
November 12, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Futch, who is well on his way to becoming boxing's George Burns, says he at first resisted overtures to train Riddick Bowe, the super-heavyweight silver medalist at the 1988 Summer Olympics. "I hadn't watched him at the Olympics, but I'd heard all the stories about him," Futch said this week. "I'd heard he was lazy, didn't have much heart or discipline. I was 78 then and I told Rock Newman (Bowe's manager) that I didn't have enough time left to waste it on someone like that."
SPORTS
March 11, 1985 | Richard Hoffer
Larry Holmes had suffered cuts before, but never one that had actually bled. He was used to having his purse cut, having long fought for promoter Don King, but he'd never actually bled anything but green until James (Bonecrusher) Smith cut him last November. Holmes managed to stop Smith and remain undefeated in his 46 fights, retaining his International Boxing Federation heavyweight championship along the way.
SPORTS
January 23, 1998 | SHAV GLICK
The moment Matt Zelen dived into the pool to start the 100-yard butterfly, he knew he had forgotten something. He had not tied his racing suit. When the St. John's junior felt his suit sliding off during an invitational meet, he decided to kick it off and finish the race. Zelen would have won by more than two seconds, except that he was disqualified for violating a uniform code. "It was hilarious, but it's too bad so many people were there," Zelen said.
SPORTS
January 26, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Eddie Futch, 81-year-old trainer of heavyweight champion Riddick Bowe, was hospitalized for treatment of a heart problem in Scotrun, Pa.
SPORTS
November 12, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eddie Futch, who is well on his way to becoming boxing's George Burns, says he at first resisted overtures to train Riddick Bowe, the super-heavyweight silver medalist at the 1988 Summer Olympics. "I hadn't watched him at the Olympics, but I'd heard all the stories about him," Futch said this week. "I'd heard he was lazy, didn't have much heart or discipline. I was 78 then and I told Rock Newman (Bowe's manager) that I didn't have enough time left to waste it on someone like that."
SPORTS
July 18, 1992 | ALLAN MALAMUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the past 36 years, the Futch touch has been applied to 17 world boxing champions. Eddie Futch, the trainer who will turn 81 next month, firmly believes the list soon will grow to 18. If Riddick Bowe defeats Pierre Coetzer, as expected, in a scheduled 12-round elimination bout tonight at the Grand Ballroom of the Mirage hotel, he will challenge heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield on Nov. 13. "I said two years ago that Bowe could beat Holyfield then," Futch said.
SPORTS
April 15, 1990 | TERRY PRICE, HARTFORD COURANT
It is Monday and Mort Sharnik is on the phone. MTV is calling. It wants George Foreman to be host of a show. It is Tuesday and Sharnik is on the phone. Dan Rooney, the Pittsburgh Steeler president, is on the other end. Sharnik is interested in bringing an NFL franchise to Connecticut and he wants some advice. It is Wednesday and Sharnik is on the phone again. Hollywood is listening to an idea Sharnik has for a dramatic miniseries. It is Thursday and--that's right -- Sharnik is on the phone.
SPORTS
April 19, 1989 | From Times wire services
Legendary boxer Sugar Ray Robinson "personified class, style and dignity," heavyweight champ Mike Tyson told more than 2,300 mourners who filled a Los Angeles church today for the five-time middleweight champion's funeral. Memories of Robinson, who died last week at age 67, so moved Tyson that his voice choked and he apologized to the throng filling the West Angeles Church of God in Christ. "I had the privilege of meeting Sugar Ray," Tyson said. "Sugar Ray Robinson personified class, style and dignity."
SPORTS
June 24, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
There is a widely held view this week that Michael Spinks, in the 12th year of an undefeated career, is finally in over his head. Sure, he was a great light-heavyweight, one of the best. Sure, he was the first light-heavyweight champion to move up and win the heavyweight championship. Sure, he beat Larry Holmes twice. But Mike Tyson, the smart guys say, is an entirely different matter. Michael Spinks, the smart guys say, has no chance.
SPORTS
April 15, 1990 | TERRY PRICE, HARTFORD COURANT
It is Monday and Mort Sharnik is on the phone. MTV is calling. It wants George Foreman to be host of a show. It is Tuesday and Sharnik is on the phone. Dan Rooney, the Pittsburgh Steeler president, is on the other end. Sharnik is interested in bringing an NFL franchise to Connecticut and he wants some advice. It is Wednesday and Sharnik is on the phone again. Hollywood is listening to an idea Sharnik has for a dramatic miniseries. It is Thursday and--that's right -- Sharnik is on the phone.
SPORTS
June 24, 1988 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
There is a widely held view this week that Michael Spinks, in the 12th year of an undefeated career, is finally in over his head. Sure, he was a great light-heavyweight, one of the best. Sure, he was the first light-heavyweight champion to move up and win the heavyweight championship. Sure, he beat Larry Holmes twice. But Mike Tyson, the smart guys say, is an entirely different matter. Michael Spinks, the smart guys say, has no chance.
SPORTS
March 11, 1985 | Richard Hoffer
Larry Holmes had suffered cuts before, but never one that had actually bled. He was used to having his purse cut, having long fought for promoter Don King, but he'd never actually bled anything but green until James (Bonecrusher) Smith cut him last November. Holmes managed to stop Smith and remain undefeated in his 46 fights, retaining his International Boxing Federation heavyweight championship along the way.
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