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Eddie Hatcher

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April 14, 1989 | From United Press International
Eddie Hatcher, a Tuscarora Indian fighting extradition to North Carolina where he is wanted for holding a newspaper staff hostage, said from his jail cell Thursday that he hopes California will not "throw me to the wolves." Hatcher, 31, lodged in the San Francisco City Jail, held a telephone news conference to announce the launching of a petition drive appealing to Gov. George Deukmejian to refuse extradition. The news conference was staged by the International Indian Treaty Council "I would ask that the justice system here not throw me to the wolves," Hatcher said.
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NEWS
December 17, 1989 | EMERY JEFFREYS, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Eddie Hatcher dwells deep within the belly of the beast, held for trial in the cavernous yellow brick prison where North Carolina's most violent felons live out their days. Hatcher is a large man with thick, black hair cascading to his shoulders. He strides into the visitors room at Central Prison, his silence masking the rage that turned this Tuscarora Indian into a caged animal. Once he begins to speak, the words tumble out. The seething anger lies close to the surface.
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NEWS
May 5, 1989
One of two men who said they took hostages in the Robesonian newspaper office in Lumberton, N.C., to draw attention to official corruption pleaded guilty to 14 counts of second-degree kidnaping. Timothy Jacobs, 20, agreed to a plea bargain that called for him to serve six years in prison followed by a six-year suspended sentence with supervised probation. Jacobs and fellow Tuscarora Indian Eddie Hatcher, 31, held up to 20 people hostage at the newspaper for 10 hours Feb. 1, 1988.
NEWS
May 8, 1989
With his client facing extradition later this month, the lawyer for Tuscarora Indian activist Eddie Hatcher said in San Francisco that he will appeal to Gov. George Deukmejian's "compassionate side" and "Armenian sense of justice" to halt Hatcher's return to North Carolina. Attorney Charles Garry, who once defended Black Panthers Bobby Seale and Huey Newton, said Hatcher's life wouldn't "be worth a tinker's damn" if Hatcher, 31, is forced to return to Lumberton, N.C., to face charges of holding 14 hostages for 10 hours in the offices of a local newspaper.
NEWS
March 15, 1989
An American Indian accused of kidnaping 14 people in a North Carolina newspaper office is being held in San Francisco on federal flight charges, an unusual step that may allow the government to avoid formal extradition proceedings. Lawyers for Eddie Hatcher accused the government of taking revenge on Hatcher for winning acquittal last October on federal hostage-taking charges.
NEWS
December 17, 1989 | EMERY JEFFREYS, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Eddie Hatcher dwells deep within the belly of the beast, held for trial in the cavernous yellow brick prison where North Carolina's most violent felons live out their days. Hatcher is a large man with thick, black hair cascading to his shoulders. He strides into the visitors room at Central Prison, his silence masking the rage that turned this Tuscarora Indian into a caged animal. Once he begins to speak, the words tumble out. The seething anger lies close to the surface.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From the Associated Press
Fugitive Indian activist Eddie Hatcher, wanted on 14 kidnaping charges in North Carolina, was arrested by the FBI on Friday after failing to persuade officials at the Soviet consulate to grant him political asylum. Hatcher was inside the consulate for several hours, until he was escorted out the gate by Soviet officials and taken into custody by waiting FBI agents.
NEWS
October 14, 1988 | Associated Press
Two American Indians charged in the takeover of a newspaper to protest alleged corruption and the treatment of minorities in their rural county were found innocent today of all charges against them. Eddie Hatcher, 31, and Timothy Jacobs, 20, were acquitted by a federal jury of weapons charges in connection with their holding of up to 20 hostages for 10 hours Feb. 1 at The Robesonian newspaper in Lumberton, in southeastern North Carolina. No one was hurt in the takeover.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | Associated Press
A man who took hostages in a newspaper office in 1988 pleaded guilty Wednesday in exchange for an 18-year prison sentence. Eddie Hatcher, 32, pleaded guilty to 14 counts of second-degree kidnaping. The maximum sentence for the charges would have been 420 years in prison. Timothy Jacobs, who helped Hatcher in the takeover, pleaded guilty to similar charges last summer and was given a six-year sentence as part of a plea bargain.
NEWS
May 5, 1989
One of two men who said they took hostages in the Robesonian newspaper office in Lumberton, N.C., to draw attention to official corruption pleaded guilty to 14 counts of second-degree kidnaping. Timothy Jacobs, 20, agreed to a plea bargain that called for him to serve six years in prison followed by a six-year suspended sentence with supervised probation. Jacobs and fellow Tuscarora Indian Eddie Hatcher, 31, held up to 20 people hostage at the newspaper for 10 hours Feb. 1, 1988.
NEWS
April 14, 1989 | From United Press International
Eddie Hatcher, a Tuscarora Indian fighting extradition to North Carolina where he is wanted for holding a newspaper staff hostage, said from his jail cell Thursday that he hopes California will not "throw me to the wolves." Hatcher, 31, lodged in the San Francisco City Jail, held a telephone news conference to announce the launching of a petition drive appealing to Gov. George Deukmejian to refuse extradition. The news conference was staged by the International Indian Treaty Council "I would ask that the justice system here not throw me to the wolves," Hatcher said.
NEWS
March 11, 1989 | From the Associated Press
Fugitive Indian activist Eddie Hatcher, wanted on 14 kidnaping charges in North Carolina, was arrested by the FBI on Friday after failing to persuade officials at the Soviet consulate to grant him political asylum. Hatcher was inside the consulate for several hours, until he was escorted out the gate by Soviet officials and taken into custody by waiting FBI agents.
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